Author Feature-Amy Tintera

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

High School

Featured Author

Amy Tintera

Amy Tintera

Rebel
Reboot

Amy Tintera grew up in Austin, Texas and graduated from Texas A&M with a degree in journalism. Following a brief career in the film industry, Amy returned to her first love - writing. Ruined, the first book in a new trilogy is scheduled for a summer 2016 release from HarperTeen. 


 

Find her on the web:

Author Website

Blog

Facebook

Goodreads

Tumblr

Twitter


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Book Trailer

 

 Rebel

Reboot


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Book Discussion Questions 

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  1. At what point do you think scientists should be using technology to play God? Who should be able to make the decisions to develop and use this technology - the government, scientists, individuals?
  2. Do you think that just because something is possible in science that we should do it? What should be used to determine what should and should not be permitted?
  3. A character's turning point is a moment within the story where the character changes his thoughts, feelings, or attitudes. This change is typically inspired by conflict. Other times, a turning point is ignited during moments when the character has encountered a crisis or learned something important enough to change his outlook and the story's direction. When did Wren reach a turning point in Reboot? Why?
  4. In science there is a law that states that you can never do just one thing to the environment. What do you think this means? How do you think the technology used in this book would change the earth?
  5. Is it ok to kill when someone else is giving the orders? 
  6. Is it ever justifiable to kill someone, other than in self-defense?
  7. Do governments ever lie to their citizens? How can the average citizen discover the truth about an issue?
  8. Why are teens attracted to science fiction stories about repressive governments and menacing technology?
  9. Are citizens ever justified in rebelling against repressive governments? 
  10. Would you be able to hurt another person if you were ordered to do so? Under what circumstances might you be able to use violence against someone?
  11. Why do you think some people reboot while others do not?
  12. If a person is brought back to life, do they still have a soul?


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Academic Programs 

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General Introduction

This program is designed for teachers to link classroom experiences to library-related activities for Amy Tintera's books, Reboot and Rebel. These activities are aligned with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills objectives and grade-level expectations of grades 9-12 in multiple subject areas. This programming is directed more toward classroom teachers and school librarians.

Activity 1: Wanted--Dead or Alive!

Introduction

Reboots who escape from HARC facilities are hunted down and captured and/or killed by HARC personnel. In most cases, they are wanted--dead or alive! In the same vein, rebels are wanted by HARC personnel for consorting with the enemy; humans are being hunted down and killed by groups of Reboots; both Reboots and Rebels would relish the opportunity to have their vengeance on HARC personnel. Students will create "Wanted Posters", similar to those from the Wild West, for characters in Amy Tintera's novels, Reboot and Rebel.

TEKS

  • English 1 - 5b, 16e, 23b, 23c
  • English 2 - 5b, 16e, 23b, 23c
  • English 3 - 5b, 16c, 16f, 23a, 23e
  • English 4 - 5b, 16c, 16f, 23a, 23e
  • US History Since 1877 - 3a, 2d, 6a, 9c, 19c, 29d, 30a, 30c, 32a, 32b
  • US Government - 8d, 14b, 14c, 20a, 20d, 21b, 21c, 21d, 22a, 22b
  • Psychology - 5f, 7a, 7b, 10b, 14d, 15b, 15c, 15d

Books to Display

  • Famous Last Words by Katie Alender
  • Killer Instinct by Jennifer Lynn Barnes
  • The Naturals by Jennifer Lynn Barnes
  • Nearly Gone by Elle Cosimano
  • Dark Song by Gail Giles
  • I Hunt Killers by Barry Lyga
  • Game by Barry Lyga
  • How to Lead a Life of Crime by Kirsten Miller
  • Jackaby by R. William Ritter

Supply List

  • Wanted Poster (1 per student)
  • Map Pencils, markers, and pencils for each student
  • Computers or iPads (if students choose a digital option)

Description:

Have the students look over the wanted posters in Wanted: Wanted Posters of the Old West look over the Wanted Posters, and read the article, ""Fugitive Alert: Our First Identification Order" to see examples of the wanted posters and get inspiration for the one they will create. This can be done outside of class if necessary.

The student will choose a character from Rebel or Reboot and design his or her Wanted Poster around that character. (See list of characters in "Resources".) The student will provide a graphic, either drawn or printed out on the Wanted Poster. The student will provide a descriptive paragraph about his chosen character on the poster. See the Wanted Poster Requirements for more information. (Resources.) Students' completed posters will be displayed in the classroom. Grading will be based on the Wanted Poster Rubric.

If students choose to make their Wanted Poster digitally, they will need to use the same directions but will need to created their own design. The poster must have the word, "WANTED", on the finished product. Students may also use this website to create their posters. It is free and easy to use.

Resources

Activity 2: Could You Survive a Zombie Apocalypse?

Introduction

Reboots are "Virus Zombies"! After catching the KDH virus and dying, they come back to life physically stronger and, supposedly, have fewer emotions just like other types of Zombies found throughout pop culture. But what would happen in a real Zombie Apocalypse? Would you have the skills and materials necessary to survive and, possibly, thrive in that environment? Let's find out!

TEKS

  • English 1 - 8, 9b, 10a, 12a, 12b, 13b, 15d, 16c, 16d, 16e, 20a, 21b, 23b, 23c, 23d, 24a, 25, 26
  • English 2 - 8, 9b, 9c, 10a, 12a, 12b, 13b, 15d, 16c, 16d, 16e, 20a, 21b, 23b, 23c, 23d, 24a, 25, 26
  • English 3 - 8, 9d, 10b, 11b, 12a, 12b, 12d, 13b, 15d, 16c, 16e, 16f, 20a, 21b, 23a, 23b, 23c, 23e, 24a, 25, 26
  • English 4 - 8, 9d, 12a, 12b, 12d, 13b, 15d, 16c, 16f, 16g, 20a, 21b, 22b, 23a, 23c, 23e, 24a, 25, 26
  • Adventure/Outdoor Education - 4e, 4f
  • Health 1 - 5d, 12a, 14a, 16a, 16b, 17c
  • Advanced Health - 5a, 13a, 14a, 14b, 15a, 15b, 16a

Books to Display

  • The Infects by Sean Beaudoin
  • Ashes by Ilsa Bick
  • World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max Brooks
  • The Zombie Survival Guide by Max Brooks
  • Zombie Apocalypse Survival Guide by Heather Dakota
  • Contaminated by Em Garner
  • Rot and Ruin by Jonathan Maberry
  • The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan
  • Alice in Zombieland by Gena Showalter
  • Zombies by Adam Woog

Supply List

  • Computer or iPad for each group
  • Scratch paper to be used for brainstorming for each group (optional)

Description

Begin by having the students read the articles below and watch the video about zombies. (This can be done outside of class if necessary.)

Articles:

Video:

Next, divide students into small groups. Each group will need an iPad or computer. The following is an example of what the teacher or librarian should say to students: "You and your group are at WalMart. You have fifteen minutes to grab anything you want, but you can only take what you are able to carry. You have no car, and all the shopping carts have already been taken. What will your group choose to take? You must be able to justify all your choices."

Students will decide as a group what items they will need. There is no limit on the number of items. They will prepare a Google presentation using pictures they find on the web. They will have fifteen minutes to search and prepare their Google presentation.

Students will then present their plans to the class. The class will vote to decide which plan would provide the best way to escape the zombies and stay alive.

Resources

Incentives

One group will win the best plan. The teacher/librarian may decide whether or not to give prizes.

Activity 3: White Hat vs. Black Hat

Introduction

Conflict can be found in many forms around the world. In Rebel by Amy Tintera, Micah wants to wipe out the human race while Callum wants to save humans. Traditionally, in Western literature and the media, the hero has been distinguished by a white hat, while the villain has sported black. In this activity, students as a group will brainstorm the qualities which define Micah and Callum's personalities as either hero or villain. They will then use their results to write an essay comparing and contrasting the two characters.

TEKS:

  • English 1 - 2, 5b, 13, 15a, 18, 19, 20a, 22, 23
  • English 2 - 2b, 13, 15a, 18, 19, 20a, 22, 23
  • English 3 - 5b, 13, 15a, 18, 19, 20a, 22, 23
  • English 4 - 13, 15a, 18, 19, 20a. 22, 23

Books to Display

  • Hush, Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick
  • Messenger of Fear by Michael Grant
  • Half Bad by Sally Green
  • The Stand by Stephen King
  • Evil Librarian by Michelle Knudsen
  • V is for Villain by Peter Moore
  • Dark Inside by Jeyn Roberts
  • Emblaze by Rebecca Shirvington

Supply List

  • Black hat enlarged on black posterboard
  • White hat enlarged on white posterboard
  • Sticky notes
  • Pens or pencils
  • Paper or computers to write rough draft

Description

Preparation:

Using the provided template, enlarge and cut out two hats on posterboard. Secure the hats to a bulletin board or other surface at the front of the room.

Program:

When the hats are ready for the program, distribute pads of sticky notes, pens, and pencils to the students. Students will brainstorm words and phrases that describe good and evil. They will write each word or phrase on a sticky note and attach it to the appropriate hat - black for evil or white for good. Using words and phrases, students will write a character analysis comparing Callum and Micah.

Resources

Activity 4: Choose Your Faction

Introduction

In Divergent by Veronica Roth, sixteen-year-old adolescents are forced to choose a Faction to define them for the rest of their lives. The selection is done on Choosing Day at a special ceremony. Similarly, students will choose which "faction" in Reboot/Rebel they would like to belong to. They must support their choices by evidence taken from the novel. After they have brainstormed individually and documented their evidence, they will debate the pros and cons of each faction.

TEKS

  • English 1 - 13b, 13c, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, 16e, 17c, 20a, 21a, 23b, 24a, 24b, 24c, 25, 26
  • English 2 - 13b, 13c, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, 16e, 20a, 21a, 23b, 24a, 24b, 24c, 25, 26
  • English 3 - 13b, 16a, 16c, 16f, 20a, 21b, 22b, 23a, 23e, 24a, 24b, 25, 26
  • English 4 - 13b, 16a, 16c, 16f, 20a, 21b, 22b, 23a, 23c, 23e, 24a, 24b, 25, 26
  • Public Speaking 1, 2, 3 - 3e, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, 6d, 6f, 7a, 7d, 7e, 8a, 8b
  • Communication Applications - 2b, 2c, 2e, 2f, 2i, 3d, 3h, 4a, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f, 4h, 4i, 4j, 4m
  • Debate 1, 2, 3 - 3f, 3g, 3i, 5a, 5b, 6b, 6c, 7a, 7c, 8a, 8c, 9a, 9b, 9c, 9d, 9e

Books to Display

  • Taken by Erin Bowman
  • The Selection by Kiera Cass
  • The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
  • The Murder Complex by Lindsay Cummings
  • The Pledge by Kimberly Derting
  • The Jewel by Amy Ewing
  • The Young Elites by Marie Lu
  • Birthmarked by Caragh O'Brien
  • Divergent by Veronica Roth
  • Orleans by Sherri Smith

Supply List

  • Pencil and paper, tablet, or computer; basically whatever the student uses to write
  • Copy of Reboot and Rebel for each group (to look up evidence for documentation)

Description

For each faction, divide the class into five different groups, one for each faction (see Faction/Character List). Each faction will get five minutes to confer with each other and come up with the points they want to present and the points they will defend. After the five minutes are up, the factions will take turns going to the front of the room to present their arguments and the teacher will serve as moderator. Each faction will get eight minutes to present their case as to why their faction is the best. At the end of all presentations the class will vote to see which faction had the best presentation.

Resources

Incentives

The teacher can decide if their should be some sort of small prize awarded to the winner of each faction debate. Otherwise, there would be no incentive.

Activity 5: Going Viral

Introduction

In Reboot by Amy Tintera, the KDH Virus spread rapidly throughout the population, killing as it traveled. Viral illnesses can be spread through contact with a person who has the disease. Some illnesses like flu, measles, and smallpox, spread quickly and are of incredible concern to the public.

Models are used in risk analyses to help predict the spread of viruses. Once scientists have calculated the risk, they use these models to come up with plans to stop the virus. They then make suggestions to prevent it from spreading further. In this activity, students will learn how an infectious disease can spread and will develop a plan to contain it.

TEKS

  • Biology: 3a, 3e, 4c, 11b, 11e
  • Health I: 7b
  • Adv. Health: 4f

Books to Display

  • The Andromeda Strain by Michael Crichton
  • Inhuman by Kat Falls
  • Killer Viruses by Linley Erin Hall
  • Sick by Tom Leveen
  • Viruses: The Origin and Evolution of Deadly Pathogens by Joseph Panno
  • The Hot Zone by Richard Preston
  • Orleans by Sherri Smith
  • Quarantine: The Loners by Lex Thomas

Supply List

  • One small square piece of paper for each student in the class
  • Pencil or pen for each student
  • Cardboard box large enough to hold the pieces of paper

Description

Begin by having the students view the video "How a Virus Changes the World". (This can be done outside of class, if necessary.)

Tell the students to write their names on the piece of paper and place it in the box. The teacher will select one name from the box, but not share the student's name. This person is infected with a virus.

There are three rounds in this activity. For the first round, each student will tap two students on the shoulder and record the names of those students in the table. For the second round, each student will again tap two students on the shoulder and record their names in the table. Repeat one more time.

When everyone is finished with round three, reveal the name of the infected person. Students will look at their charts to see if they had contact with the infected person. The students who had contact will raise their hands, and you will write their names on the board.

Students will then check to see if they had contact with anyone listed on the board. If they did, they will need to raise their hands. Write their names on the board.

Using the list on the board, complete the worksheet questions.

Resouces

 

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Active Programs


Printable Copy

Program Title: Zombie or Human?: Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse

Introduction

In Reboot, the world has been ravaged by the KDH virus, which causes people to die and then, in some cases, reboot as stronger and faster versions of themselves. Essentially, reboots are virus-based zombies. The following multi-part program is designed to appeal to the zombie-loving teen. The program can either be run in its entirety over the course of a summer, or individual parts can be run as stand-alone programs.

Activity 1: Surviving as a Zombie: Zombie Makeup

Introduction

Are you really a zombie if you don't look the part?

Books to Display

  • So Now You're a Zombie: A Handbook for the Newly Undead by John Austin
  • Zombie High Yearbook '64 by Jeff Busch
  • The Makeup Artist Handbook: Techniques for Film, Television, Photography, and Theatre by Gretchen Davis and Mindy Hall
  • Stage Makeup: the Actor's Complete Guide to Today's Techniques and Materials by Laura Thudium
  • A Complete Guide to Special Effects Makeup by Tokyo SFX Makeup Workshop
  • How to Be a Zombie by Serena Valentino
  • Undead: Everything the Modern Zombie Needs to Know by Serena Valentino
  • Extreme Face Painting: 50 Friendly & Fiendish Step-by-Step Demos by Brian & Nick Wolf

Supply List

  • Makeup artist
  • Costume makeup, fake blood, etc.
  • Makeup sponges, Q-tips, etc.
  • Mirrors

Description

This program is easiest and most fun when taught by a theatrical makeup artist. Try contacting local theater departments (schools, community colleges, small community theaters, etc.) to find someone willing to teach a zombie makeup class either for free or for a small fee. If you cannot find a volunteer, feel free to use tutorials online (found via Pinterest, Instructables or YouTube) or from books (see list in the Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians section) to lead a program on applying zombie makeup.

Resources

BOOKS:

    • The Makeup Artist Handbook: Techniques for Film, Television, Photography, and Theatre by Gretchen Davis and Mindy Hall
    • Stage Makeup: the Actor's Complete Guide to Today's Techniques and Materials by Laura Thudium
    • A Complete Guide to Special Effects Makeup by Tokyo SFX Makeup Workshop
    • Extreme Face Painting: 50 Friendly & Fiendish Step-by-Step Demos by Brian & Nick Wolf

DVD:

    • Fantastic Flesh, documentary directed by Kevin VanHook

Activity #2: Surviving as a Zombie: Brain Eating Contest

Introduction

Everyone knows a zombie's favorite food is human brains. Do you have what it takes to survive on this delicacy?

Books to Display

  • So Now You're a Zombie: A Handbook for the Newly Undead by John Austin
  • The Enemy by Charlie Higson
  • The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman (Graphic Novels)
  • Rot & Ruin by Jonathan Maberry
  • Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion
  • The Zombie Book: The Encyclopedia of the Living Dead by Nick Redfern and Brad Steiger
  • How to Be a Zombie by Serena Valentino
  • Undead: Everything the Modern Zombie Needs to Know by Serena Valentino

Supply List

Description

Before the day of the activity, make the jello brains following the recipe provided in the Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians, or a recipe of your own choosing. To control the number of jello brains you will have to make, either require pre-registration with a limit of attendees, or set a limit on the number of participants. You may also need to require permission slips signed by a parent or guardian.

During the program, cover the tables (and floor, if you feel it is necessary) with plastic coverings and place the jello brains on paper plates. Teens participating in the contest must eat the jello brains without using their hands. Teens not participating in the brain eating contest can act as cheerleaders and informal judges and timekeepers. The first person who finishes their jello brain wins.

Incentives

If funds allow, give out brain or zombie themed prizes (many of which can be purchased inexpensively from Oriental Trading) for the winners and, if desired, the participants.

Resources

HANDOUTS

    • Sample Permission Slip (Before use, consult your library's administration or legal department to verify that it meets necessary standards.)

WEBSITES

Activity 3: Surviving as a Zombie: Finding Your Zen

Introduction

Being a zombie is a bit rage-inducing. Use these handy tricks to find your zen and you might not want to eat your friends' brains!

Books to Display

  • Yoga for Beginners by Mark Ansari
  • The Yoga Bible by Christina Brown
  • The Women's Health Big Book of Yoga by Kathryn Budig
  • Breathe: Yoga for Teens by Mary Kaye Chryssicas
  • Um, Like...Om: A Girl Goddess's Guide to Yoga by Evan Cooper
  • Yogalosophy: 28 Days to the Ultimate Mind-Body Makeover by Mandy Ingber
  • Yoga Exercises for Teens: Developing a Calmer Mind and a Stronger Body by Helen Purperhart
  • Teaching Yoga: Essential Foundations and Techniques by Mark Stephens

Supply List

  • Licensed yoga instructor
  • Open floor space
  • AV system with speakers
  • Instructional DVDs (optional)
  • Permission slips signed by parent or guardian

Description

This program works best when taught by a licensed yoga instructor. Try contacting local yoga studios, fitness centers or community colleges to see if someone would be willing to teach a class for free or a small fee. If you cannot find a volunteer, this program will also work with instructional DVDs projected onto a screen. Encourage teens to wear comfy clothing and bring a towel for the program. As always, before embarking on any exercise program, consult with your library's administration about any potential liability issues. You may also need to require permission slips signed by a parent or guardian.

Resources

HANDOUTS

    • Sample Permission Slip (Before use, consult your library's administration or legal department to verify that it meets necessary standards.)

BOOKS

    • Teaching Yoga: Essential Foundations and Techniques by Mark Stephens

DVDS

    • Yoga for Beginners, Bodywisdom, Barbara Benagh
    • Yoga for Stress Relief, Bodywisdom, Barbara Benagh
    • AM & PM Yoga for Beginners, Element, Elena Brower
    • Rodney Yee's Yoga for Beginners, Gaiam, Rodney Yee

Activity 4: Surviving as a Human: Self Defense

Introduction

Don't get caught without a good defense! These self defense skills are useful against humans and zombies alike.

Books to Display

  • Ashes by Ilsa J. Bick
  • World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max Brooks
  • The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks
  • The Zombie Handbook: An Essential Guide to Zombies and, More Importantly, How to Avoid Them by Robert Curran
  • The Zombie Combat Manual: A Guide to Fighting the Living Dead by Roger Ma
  • Attack Proof: The Ultimate Guide to Personal Protection by John Perkins
  • How to Defend Yourself in 3 Seconds or Less: The Self Defense Secrets You Need to Know by Phil Pierce
  • Self Defense Made Simple by Phil Pierce
  • Alice in Zombieland by Gena Showalter

Supply List

Description

This program is most effective when taught by an instructor trained in self defense. To find an instructor willing to teach a session for free or (if your library has the funds) a small fee, contact local police departments or campus police. Some martial arts studios or self defense academies in your area might also be willing to provide free instruction. For more ideas on finding a qualified instructor, the R.A.D. Systems of Self Defense website (listed under Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians) also has a list broken down by city and state. As always, before embarking on any overtly physical program, consult with your library's administration about any potential liability issues. You may also need to require permission slips signed by a parent or guardian.

Resources

HANDOUTS

    • Sample Permission Slip (Before use, consult your library's administration or legal department to verify that it meets necessary standards.)

BOOKS

    • The Urban Survival Handbook by Harry Cook, Bill Mattos and Bob Morrison
    • Attack Proof: The Ultimate Guide to Personal Protection by John Perkins
    • How to Defend Yourself in 3 Seconds or Less: The Self Defense Secrets You Need to Know by Phil Pierce
    • Self Defense Made Simple by Phil Pierce

WEBSITES

Activity 5: Surviving as a Human: Bug-Out Bag 101

Introduction

When the zombie apocalypse hits, don't get caught unawares! Get your bug-out bag ready.

Books to Display

  • The Enemy by Charlie Higson
  • Hollowland by Amanda Hocking
  • The Practical Preppers Complete Guide to Disaster Preparedness by Scott Hunt
  • The Zombie Rule Book: A Zombie Apocalypse Survival Guide by Tony Newton
  • The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook by Joshua Piven
  • The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan
  • This Is Not a Test by Courtney Summers
  • The Art of Eating through the Zombie Apocalypse: A Cookbook and Culinary Survival Guide by Lauren Wilson

Supply List

Description

Before the activity, print a copy of the Bug-Out Bag Script (found under Resources). Feel free to modify this script to fit the needs of your group. Also print out a copy of the handout Bug-Out Bag 101: The Essentials (found under resources) for each participant.

On the day of the activity, begin by asking teens if they are familiar with bug-out bags. If they do not know what a bug-out bag is, explain that it is a kit that is prepared ahead of time and packed with all the essentials needed to get through the first 72 hours of the zombie apocalypse (or any other disaster – natural or supernatural). A successful bug-out bag is easily portable and contains only necessary items.

Split teens into two or more teams, give them pencil and paper, and tell them they have 3-5 minutes to brainstorm a list of items they think would be most useful for surviving a zombie apocalypse. Once all teams have their list, begin reading the script.

At marked breaks in the script, have each team tell you if an item (or items) on their list will work to solve the problem. Teams may argue for items on their own list that they think would work, or against items on another team's list that they think would not work. Give teams a point for each item they have on their list that would fit. At the end of the script, tally the points for each team. The team with the most points wins the challenge.

At the end of the activity, give each participant a copy of the handout Bug-Out Bag 101: The Essentials (found under resources) so that they can create their own bug-out bag at home.

Incentives

If funds allow, give out small prizes (bookmarks, candy, zombie-themed prizes, etc.) to the members of the winning team.

Resources

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

BOOKS:

    • The Practical Preppers Complete Guide to Disaster Preparedness by Scott Hunt
    • Emergency Food Storage & Survival Handbook by Peggy Layton
    • The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook by Joshua Piven

WEBSITES:

Activity 6: Celebrating Your Inner Zombie

Introduction

Show off newly acquired skills at either a Zombie Walk or a Zombie Prom!

Books to Display

  • Zombie Queen of Newbury High by Amanda Ashby
  • Something Strange and Deadly by Susan Dennard
  • Dearly, Departed by Lia Habel
  • Zombie Blondes by Brian James
  • You Are So Undead to Me by Stacey Jay
  • Zombies vs Unicorns by Justine Larbalestier & Holly Black
  • I Kissed a Zombie, and I Liked It by Adam Selzer
  • Never Slow Dance with a Zombie by E. Van Lowe
  • Generation Dead by Daniel Waters

Supply List

  • Option #1: permission slips, map of trail, prizes or ribbons (optional)
  • Option #2: open floor space, AV system with speakers, prizes or ribbons (optional), refreshments (optional), twinkle lights (optional)

Description

There are two options for hosting this program: a Zombie Walk or a Zombie Prom. Each option is fun and easy to host. Both programs can be hosted on a low budget, but the Prom takes more staff time to prepare.

Option #1: Zombie Walk

A Zombie Walk is a fun and inexpensive way to show off newly acquired zombie makeup skills and zombie personality traits. Before the event, map out the area where your walk will occur. If you are going outside the library, you will probably need to require permission slips signed by parents or guardians. Always have an alternate indoor route in case of rainy weather. On the day of the Walk, gather all zombie participants in one location (i.e., a library meeting room). At the appointed time, zombies will walk, shamble or shuffle their way around the pre-approved trail. Zombie noises are encouraged.

Option #2: Zombie Prom

Like the Zombie Walk, the Zombie Prom is a fun excuse to practice zombie makeup and costuming skills. Before the event, clear a big open space in the meeting room you will be using. If time and money permits, decorate the room with strings of twinkle lights, etc. Select appropriate, up-tempo music to play throughout the Prom. If you don't have access to CDs or an MP3 player, try creating a playlist online through Spotify or a similar music site. Always make sure that the music you choose to play is covered by your library's performance license or falls under the educational Fair Use exemption. During the event, put out refreshments (if budget permits), dim the overhead lights, play the music and let the zombies dance, shuffle and mingle!

Incentives

If you plan on running a costume contest in conjunction with the Zombie Walk or Prom, small prizes could be provided for different categories (scariest makeup; best homemade costume; most elaborate; funniest; most in-character, etc.)

Resources

HANDOUTS

    • Sample Permission Slip (Before use, consult your library's administration or legal department to verify that it meets necessary standards.)

WEBSITES


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Passive Program 

Printable Copy

Activity 1: Epidemics and Pandemics Throughout History

Introduction

In Reboot, the United States has been ravaged by KDH, a virus that, in some instances, causes people who die to reboot, or come back to life. To contain the spread of the virus, Texas closes its borders and becomes the Republic of Texas, governed by the Human Advancement and Repopulation Corporation. The purpose of this display is to discuss real epidemics and pandemics throughout history, containment and treatment, and the ultimate effect on humanity.

Books to Display

  • Fever 1793 by Laurie Halse Anderson
  • The Way We Fall by Megan Crewe
  • Masque of the Red Death by Bethany Griffin
  • The Great Trouble: A Mystery of London, the Blue Death, and a Boy Called Eel by Deborah Hopkinson
  • Conversion by Katherine Howe
  • Love is the Drug by Alaya Dawn Johnson
  • A Matter of Days by Amber Kizer
  • A Death-Struck Year by Makiia Lucier
  • An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793 by Jim Murphy
  • Orleans by Sherri L. Smith
  • Stung by Bethan Wiggins
  • In the Shadow of Blackbirds by Cat Winters
  • The Program by Suzanne Young

Supply List

  • Butcher paper, scissors, stapler
  • Timeline of Epidemics & Pandemics (found under Resources)

Description

This is a static display that will highlight epidemics and pandemics throughout history. Use the provided Timeline of Epidemics & Pandemics (found under Resources) and any other supporting documents and books (i.e., the various infographics on vaccines linked to in the Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians section) to create an informative and eye-catching display.

Resources

HANDOUTS

BOOKS

    • Plagues in World History by John Aberth
    • Dread: How Fear and Fantasy have Fueled Epidemics from The Black Death to Avian Flu by Philip Alcabes
    • Epidemics and Pandemics: Their Impacts on Human History by J.N. Hays
    • The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic-and How it Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World by Steven Johnson
    • When Germs Travel: Six Major Epidemics That Have Invaded America and the Fears They Have Unleashed by Howard Markel
    • Inside the Outbreaks: The Elite Medical Detectives of the Epidemic Intelligence Service by Mark Pendergrast
    • The Hot Zone: The Terrifying True Story of the Origins of the Ebola Virus by Richard Preston
    • Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen

WEBSITES

Activity 2: Braaaains!: Zombies in Pop Culture

Introduction

Although Wren and the other Reboots under HARC's control are stronger, faster, and in control of their faculties, they are, essentially, virus-based zombies. Zombies in literature, movies and film have taken on many different characteristics and abilities. The purpose of this display is to promote discussion of the evolution and various incarnations of zombies in pop culture.

Books to Display

  • Ashes by Ilsa J. Bick
  • World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War by Max Brooks
  • Zombie High Yearbook '64 by Jeff Busch
  • Feed by Mira Grant
  • The Enemy by Charlie Higson
  • The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman (Graphic Novels)
  • Dead Inside, Do Not Enter: Notes from the Zombie Apocalypse by Lost Zombies
  • Rot & Ruin by Jonathan Maberry
  • Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion
  • The Zombie Book: The Encyclopedia of the Living Dead by Nick Redfern and Brad Steiger
  • The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan
  • Zom-B by Darren Shan
  • Zombies Hate Stuff by Greg Stones
  • This Is Not a Test by Courtney Summers

Supply List

  • Butcher paper, scissors, stapler
  • Zombie Voting Sign (found under Resources)
  • Zombie Ballots (found under Resources)
  • Golf Pencils
  • Ballot box or basket
  • Small table

Detailed Description of Activity

This is primarily a static display that highlights zombies in pop culture and the evolution of the zombie. Add passive interaction with teens by setting up a voting station using the Zombie Voting Sign and ballots found under Resources. Teens are encouraged to vote for their favorite zombie book and movie/TV show, and place the ballots in a ballot box or basket located on a small table or shelf near the display. A week or so before the display is taken down, tally the votes and put the results on the display for teens to see.

Resources

HANDOUTS

BOOKS

    • American Zombie Gothic: The Rise and Fall (and Rise) of the Walking Dead in Popular Culture by Kyle William Bishop
    • Zombie Culture: Autopsies of the Living Dead by Shawn McIntosh
    • Zombies!: An Illustrated History of the Undead by Jovanka Vuckovic

ARTICLES

WEBSITES

 
 
If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster

 

 

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Created on Apr 6, 2015 | Last updated July 21, 2015