Author Feature-Sherry Thomas

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

High School

Featured Author

Sherry Thomas

Sherry Thomas

The Burning Sky

Sherry Thomas is an award winning romance author who has published over a dozen novels. She lives in Texas with her family and spends time playing computer games with her sons or reading when not working on her next novel. The Burning Sky was Sherry's first novel for teens and the sequel, The Perilous Sea, released in September 2014 from Balzer & Bray.

 

Find her on the web:

Author Website

Facebook

Goodreads

Twitter


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Book Trailer

 


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Book Discussion Questions 

Printable Copy

  1. Why do you think Thomas chose the very specific and real time period of 1883 as the setting for the novel? How does that time period affect the story?
  2. The setting includes both a real place (Britain) and a made-up fantasy place (The Realm). Why do you think Thomas chose to include a real place in the setting of her fantasy novel?
  3. Why did Titus expect the great elemental mage to be a boy? 
  4. Why do you think Thomas chose to set the story at Eton? How would the story have been different if Iolanthe had hidden somewhere else? Why not make up a school?
  5. Can you think of any other instances in history when it was necessary for females to dress up as males? Why was it necessary? What about males dressing up as females?
  6. Can you think of other instances in literature where characters dress up as the opposite gender? Is it always females dressing as males? What role does this trope play in the development of the stories?
  7. With all the many options available to him, why do you think Titus chose to create a Sleeping Beauty story in the Crucible? And why was it important to him that her garrett reflect neglect? 
  8. Titus puts a lot of faith in his mother's vision. Do you think some people can tell the future? What do you think the purpose of our dreams is?
  9. Do you think his mother's vision was fulfilled because of fate, or did Titus make it a self-fulfilling prophecy? Would it have been possible for Titus to have altered or prevented his fate? 
  10. Why is the tyrannical state Iolanthe and Titus are fighting called Atlantis? Why would Thomas choose that name?


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Academic Programs 

Printable Copy

General Introduction

The Burning Sky is a unique blend of fantasy and historical fiction. Educators can capitalize on this combination with students, using the novel to help students understand its historical context and the historical context to more deeply analyze the novel. Further, the fantasy elements offer opportunities for academic activities that are fun for students but require them to analyze the novel's many rich literary elements.

Activity 1 - Map the Setting

Introduction

With this activity, students will create a map of the setting, either for the main story (ie. The Realm) or the book that Iolanthe and Titus enter (ie. The Crucible). By providing text evidence from the book for their choices, students will demonstrate their understanding of a literary text.

TEKS

  • English 1 - 5, 7, 12, 21b, 23c
  • English 2 - 5, 7, 12, 21b, 23c
  • English 3 - 5, 7, 12, 21b
  • English 4 - 5, 7, 12, 21b

Books to Display*

  • Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo
  • Demon King by Cinda Williams Chima
  • Exquisite Captive by Heather Demetrios
  • Huntress by Malinda Lo
  • We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
  • Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas
  • Monsters of Men by Patrick Ness
  • Clariel by Garth Nix
  • Snow Like Ashes by Sara Raasch
  • Days of Blood and Starlight by Laini Taylor

*These are the books that are the answers to the anticipatory quiz in the activity below. You could also include the incorrect answer books from the quiz.

Supply List

  • Blank unlined paper
  • Colored pencils

Description

Anticipatory Activity:

To introduce the mapping activity, pique students' interest, and give them examples of literary maps, use the "How Well Do You Know Your YA Maps" link to quiz them over maps from YA books. Probably the easiest way to do this is to project the map on a large screen and have students raise their hand to guess each book, or have students write their guesses on a sheet of paper and then review the answers together as a class at the end of the quiz.

"How Well Do You Know YA Maps?"

Map the Setting:

Tell students that they will be creating a map for The Burning Sky that could be published with the book such as those in the quiz. You can choose whether you want them to map The Realm or The Crucible or if you want to give students the choice.

Review the different maps from the quiz together as a class. Have students identify different elements common to all of the maps (location titles, geographic features represented by symbols and/or names, compasses, graphic symbols of important elements in the novel, etc.). Distribute the included instructions/text evidence page in Activity Resources and review with students. Students can do this in class or for homework, but it will probably take at least two or three class periods because they have to locate the places and text evidence in the book in addition to drawing the map. Display completed maps around the room or library. You could have students explain their maps to the class and/or vote on the best ones.

Resources

Activity 2: From Page to Screen

Introduction

Students will pretend they are pitching The Burning Sky to a movie production company to buy the film rights to the book. They must understand the book in order to make a case for why it would make a good movie and what the key scenes and characters are.

TEKS

  • English 1 - 2, 5a, 5b, 13a, 15b, 16, 18, 19
  • English 2 - 2, 5a, 5b, 13a, 15b, 16, 18, 19
  • English 3 - 2, 5a, 5b, 13a, 15b, 16, 18, 19
  • English 4 - 2, 5a, 5b, 13a, 15b, 16, 18, 19

Books to Display

  • Writing Treatments That Sell by Kenneth Atchity and Chi-Li Wong
  • The Maze Runner by James Dashner
  • The 10 Day Screenplay by Darrin and Travis Donnelly
  • Movie Storyboards: The Art of Visualizing Screenplays by Fionnuala Halligan
  • Selling Your Story in 60 Seconds by Michael Hauge
  • Writing Screenplays That Sell by Michael Hauge
  • Inception: The Shooting Script by Christopher and Jonah Nolan
  • Save the Cat: The Last Book on Screenwriting You'll Ever Need by Blake Snyder

Supply List

Description

Anticipatory Activity:

Show a trailer for or a clip of a popular movie that is based on a book, such as this movie trailer for The Maze Runner by James Dashner.

As a class, have students brainstorm books that have been made into movies and then circle the ones they liked. Have students discuss the question "What kind of books make good movies? Why?" The instructor or a student can write the suggested criteria on the board as students contribute ideas.

Pitching the Book:

Tell students they will be creating a "pitch" to convince a movie studio to buy the film rights to The Burning Sky to make it into a movie. They will fill out the included Movie Pitch Template. You can have students present their ideas or just their "elevator speech" to the class if you want to.

Resources

Activity 3:Victorian Education

Introduction

By reading and analyzing Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own, students will learn more about and understand better the historical context of The Burning Sky's setting, particularly Victorian education and Eton. Students can think more deeply about the society in which Iolanthe was living, the roles and status of males and females, and the need for and effects of Iolanthe's cross-dressing. Further, students can consider the issue of "women's fiction," what it means to be a female author, and whether or not the issues faced by women in Iolanthe and Woolf's eras are still relevant today.

TEKS

  • English 4 - 1B, 1E, 2A, 2C, 6, 7, 8, 9A, 9C, 9D, 10B, 18, 19, 26

(Although this lesson could potentially be done at other grade levels, the difficulty of "A Room of One's Own" and the focus on British literature at the senior level make it probably best suited to English 4.)

Books to Display

  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  • Virginia Woolf: A Biography by Quentin Bell
  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  • Middlemarch by George Eliot
  • Mary Barton by Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Lycidas by John Milton
  • The Complete Works of Shakespeare by William Shakespeare
  • The Victorians by A.N. Wilson

Supply List

  • Print dictionaries or access to an online dictionary (school-provided or on students' own mobile devices)
  • Internet access (could be students' own mobile devices)
  • Butcher paper or poster boards
  • Markers

Description

Anticipatory Activity:

Before beginning the book, have students share what, if anything, they know or have heard about Eton. Then show them the first film clip of Eton boys playing cricket and have them share anything new they can infer about the school from the clip (example: all boys, upper-class, white, very old school -- infer the time period of the clip based on clothes, lack of automobiles, film quality, etc.). You can set up the clip beforehand by telling them they are playing cricket, or you can ask them what they were doing after viewing the clip and discuss what cricket is.

British Pathe - Eton College Film Clips  

A Room of One's Own Jigsaw

Lead the class in a close reading of the first paragraph of Woolf's A Room of One's Own. The instructor can make print copies in advance to distribute to each individual student (which would allow students to annotate), or the text can be projected on a large screen for all students to see. A Room of One's Own is from 1929, but the content discusses the history of British women's education and writing.

Divide students into six groups. Each group will be responsible for reading, understanding, and explaining one chapter from A Room of One's Own. Each group will complete the sheet "Understanding A Room of One's Own" (included in the Activity Resources). The students can fill it out on a regular 8.5x11 sheet of paper as it appears here, or they can be instructed to use the same format but put it onto butcher paper or poster boards so that they can be shared with the class. If you have access to computers, students could even make it into a digital presentation. You can allow students to divide up the work as they see fit, or you can assign each member certain sections of the chart. Once groups are finished, have them share their completed charts with the class. If they are not digital, they can be displayed around the classroom or library. Each group is responsible for teaching the rest of the class the chapter they studied.

As an optional follow-up, students can answer one or more of the following example questions in a Socratic seminar, journal, short-answer, or essay.

    • Did Woolf sufficiently make her case that ___?
    • Why does Woolf use fictional stories in a nonfiction text?
    • What does A Room of One's Own tell us about education for females during Iolanthe's time?
    • Do you think that women have a way of writing that is distinct or different from men? Can you tell if a book had a male or female author?
    • How do you think The Burning Sky might have been different if it had been written by a male author?
    • Woolf asserts that female writers "had no tradition behind them." Do you think this is true of Sherry Thomas? What "tradition" of writing does Thomas have behind her? Do you see any ways that might inform her writing?
    • Woolf quotes Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch that "a poor child in England had little more hope than had the son of an Athenian slave to be emancipated into that intellectual freedom of which great writings are born." How true, if at all, is this statement in America today?
    • Woolf laments that females are rarely depicted as friends, that "almost without exception they are shown in their relation to men." In thinking about the books you've read, do you agree? How would The Burning Sky have been different if it had been about two girls? Two boys?
    • Woolf asks, "What conditions are necessary for the creation of works of art?" What is your answer to this?

Resources

  • Understanding A Room of One's Own
  • British Pathe - Eton College Film Clips 
  • More lesson ideas for A Room of One's Own from Virginia Woolf and Her Female Contemporaries: The 25th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, June 4-7, 2015. Bloomsburg University. 12 Jan. 2015. Online.
  • Full texts of Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own are available from many online sources, such as this one from eBooks@Adelaide, the University of Adelaide.

 

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Active Programs


Printable Copy

Title: Fairy Tales and Top Hats - A Victorian + Fantasy Themed Event

Introduction

Bring fairy tales and real history to life with an afternoon of themed events inspired by The Burning Sky. Teens will get a taste of Victorian culture, explore alternative versions of their favorite classic stories, and share their own fantastic ideas. This event includes one unstructured activity, one structured activity, and three activities that can be either structured or unstructured depending on your preferences.

Books to Display

  • Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
  • Seraphina by Rachel Hartman
  • Charmed Life by Diana Wynne Jones
  • Wondrous Strange by Lesley Livingston
  • Wicked Lovely by Melissa Marr
  • Bloody Jack by L.A. Meyer
  • Cinder by Marissa Meyer
  • Alanna: The First Adventure by Tamora Pierce
  • The Burning Sky by Sherry Thomas
  • The Accidental Highwayman: Being the Tale of Kit Bristol, His Horse Midnight, a Mysterious Princess, and Sundry Magical Persons Besides by Ben Tripp
  • plus, any fairy tale collections or books with a Victorian setting that fit the theme

Activity 1: Fantastic Photo Booth

Introduction

Set up a goofy photo opportunity for teens using Victorian and fairytale inspired accessories.

Supply List

  • A well-lit area
  • Plain backdrop
  • Camera, if providing photos to participants
  • Various themed accessories, including but not limited to: top hats, fascinators, crowns, fairy wings, capes, and hand-held mustaches (free printable examples are included in resources)

Description

If the participating teens possess their own cameras or smartphones, encourage them to use their own devices to take selfies or photos of their friends. Offer to take group photos.

If participants do not possess their own cameras or smartphones, you can either (a) provide a disposable camera and let the participants pick up their prints at the library at a later date or (b) use a digital camera to take photos and either email them to participants or upload them to an online album. If uploading pictures to the Web make sure that you have parental permission!

Resources

Activity 2: "Yriaf Selat" Contest - Reversed Fairy Tale Costume Contest

Introduction

Have teens compete for the prize(s) for the most creative "reversed" Victorian- or fantasy-themed costume. This may include gender-bender or good-guy-gone-bad (and vice versa) categories.

Supply List

Description

Registration for this event may be necessary but should be determined by the librarian in charge. Take into account average teen program attendance and typical behavior of regular teen program participants at your library.

If requiring registration, print the sign-up labels and put them on the index cards. Either make these available as a sort of self-serve sign up system at a desk or display area, or fill them out when teens contact you to sign up for the event. The cards will later be used to announce each participant during the actual contest. These cards are also your way of making sure your teens have a clear idea of what sort of costume contest they'll be participating in.

This costume contest requires a small panel of impartial judges; parents of participants and other non-participant teens are not ideal judges for this activity. Try engaging library staff or community leaders who are not usually part of teen programming. This may be the perfect time to win over another supporter for your Teen Department!

Set a definite time frame for the costume contest. If you are conducting this contest as part of a larger event (including other activities from this program collection), we recommend either (a) having the contest at the beginning of the event, allowing teens to participate in other activities in their regular clothing should they choose to change out of their costume, or (b) having the contest at the end of the event, allowing a short time for participants to change into costumes if they did not arrive already dressed, and also allowing plenty of time for stragglers and last-minute costume repairs if needed.

Clear a space for contest entrants to strut their stuff while you announce and describe their costume based on the cards you received from each participant.

After the participants have showed the judges their costumes, the judges must convene to vote for their favorites. If you encounter ties for any categories, you can either allow the tie and award both winners or you, as event MC, can act as tie-breaker.

We recommend using only one of the optional ballot templates. Ballot 1 includes the following categories: Most Creative, Biggest Effort, and Funniest. Ballot 2 includes the following categories: Best Gender-Bender, Best Hero-Turned-Villain, and Best Villain-Turned-Hero.

If only a handful of teens participate, you may wish to forgo the use of ballot templates and vote for 1 simple "best overall" category. If many teens participate, you may wish to award additional smaller prizes for the runners-up in each category.

Please consider the possibility that transgender and intersex students may wish to participate in this event. Be sensitive to their needs and avoid making the costume contest into nothing more than a cross-dressing joke.

Incentives

  • 2 certificate templates are provided; these can be printed on cardstock or another high-quality paper for winners and/or participants.

However, you may also wish to provide small prizes for winners as incentive to participate. In the interest of encouraging community engagement, we suggest providing gift cards to a local bookshop, tickets to an upcoming school or community theater production, or a school or library T-shirt.

Resources

TEMPLATES

WEBSITES

Activity 3: Fan-tastic: Fan Art from the Community

Introduction

Display an art gallery specifically focusing on "fan art" and allow the teens to try making their own. Get a local artist or two involved if possible.

Supply List

  • Bulletin board, large poster board, or wall suitable for displaying artworks
  • 10-20 pieces of "fan art" from various artists, either public domain or used with permission
  • Sketching paper, or plain white paper if unavailable and various sketching implements
  • Watercolor paper, watercolor paint sets, various paint brushes and/or watercolor pencils, cups of water, and paper towels
  • Podium and microphone for presenter(s), if needed

Description

Prepare a bulletin board, poster, or wall for an art display. This should be well-lit and easy to find but away from high-traffic walkways to encourage lingering.

Choose artworks to display and get permission to display the items if needed. See the resources listed below for examples of places you can get free art for your display. Remember, the displayed artworks should feature creative interpretations of fairy tales, fantasy stories, or popular myths. It is acceptable to use older "classical" material, as those artworks can be used to show that "fan art" has been around for a long time (Example, Victorian-era paintings of Shakespeare scenes such as Romeo and Juliet (1884) by Frank Dicksee).

Mat, back, or cheaply frame the artworks if budget and time allows. Include either a single sign listing all titles and artists or include small labels next to individual pieces. Next, arrange art supplies on tables for "free range" art-making. Remember to include any required extras, depending on your art supplies. For example, watercolor materials will require small cups of water and paper towels for blotting.

If inviting artists to present:

Search for local artists who might be willing to help with your program well in advance of the event. Make your expectations very clear when inviting them and confirm their attendance at least a week prior to the event.

How your artists participate is up to you and them. They may be comfortable giving a short talk or Q&A session about how fairy tales and fantasy stories have influenced their work. Alternatively, they may wish to provide basic instruction on techniques at the art-making station. Some local art groups provide art education programs with definite lesson plans or audience participation expectations.

Resources

Activity 4: Fractured Fairy Tales Game - Fairy tale "Mad Libs"

Introduction

Play a fairy tale/fantasy-themed "Mad Libs" style game. This can be done as a group or individually.

Supply List

Description

Assign one player to fill out the game sheet. The players then take turns providing the type of word that is required to fill in the blank. When all of the blanks have been filled, read the completed story by filling in the words that the players came up with.

Resources

Activity 5: Fancy Tea Party

Introduction

Try a Victorian-style tea party, complete with "fancy" drinks and finger foods. If weather and budget permits, a quick game of croquet can enhance the Victorian theme.

Supply List

  • 1-3 types of tea, served warm in a pot or iced in a carafe depending on the weather
  • Lemonade option for participants who do not drink tea
  • Fixings for the tea: sugar cubes, lemon slices, milk, non-dairy milk substitute, honey packets, and mint leaves
  • Easy-prep finger foods: British "biscuits" of various flavors, crackers with toppings such as cream cheese and cucumbers, mini scones or similar pastries
  • Stylish disposable cups and saucers, or "real" tea cups and saucers if budget and clean-up are not obstacles
  • Table decorations such as Victorian-ish tablecloths, inexpensive flowers in non-breakable vases, etc.
  • Background music, if available
  • Full croquet set and a lawn on which to play it (optional)

Description

Simply provide themed drinks and snacks at decorated tables. We recommend playing instrumental background music from the Victorian era if your library has a license to do so or has access to public domain music.

Remember, even if a composition is old enough to be out of copyright, a recent recording of a musician playing it may not be. Playing music in a school library for an educational program is usually considered Fair Use. However, that same concept of education-based Fair Use does not always apply in public libraries and performance of audiovisual media is usually covered by an umbrella license. Please speak with your library's legal expert for clarification if needed.

(See copyright discussions in resources below.)

IF playing outdoor croquet....

This game option is easy to set up, but it also requires lawn space, fair weather, and either a borrowed croquet set or the funds to purchase one. Simply set up the croquet game on your designated lawn and help participants play the game according to the usual rules. If an outdoor game is not feasible, try using pairs of bookends arranged as wickets for an indoor game (if space permits).
(See croquet rules in resources below)

Resources


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Passive Program 

Printable Copy

Activity 1: 3 Word Book Talk

Introduction

Can you convince someone to try a book in less than a second or two? Describe your favorite books using just 3 words!

Books to Display

  • Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo
  • The Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson
  • Seraphina by Rachel Hartman
  • Egg & Spoon by Gregory Maguire
  • Wicked Lovely by Melissa Marr
  • Cinder by Marissa Meyer
  • Sisters Red by Jackson Pearce
  • The Grimm Legacy by Polly Shulman
  • The Glass Casket by McCormick Templeman
  • The Burning Sky by Sherry Thomas

Supply List

  • 2 plastic sign holders, displaying program signs (see activity resources)
  • 1 large jar or similar container; opening must be large enough to easily admit hands
  • 1 bowl
  • Multicolored paper, cut into strips
  • Library pencils
  • Counter, table, shelf top, or other surface on which to place display

Detailed Description of Activity

This is a student/patron-driven "booktalk" program, with an optional digital component. This tabletop display encourages teens to share their opinions of books with each other. Begin by printing the provided signs. Place Sign 1 at the left side of the display to explain the concept of the program. Sign 1 asks participants to write a book or story title and author (if known) on a slip of paper along with 3 words that describe the book or story. The objective is to "sell" the book or story to their peers.

Provide eye-catching paper slips in the bowl to the right of Sign 1. Leave an empty, lidless jar next to the bowl. To demonstrate the concept and encourage participation, fill out a few "starter" slips and place them in the jar.

If you manage your library's social media accounts on platforms that utilize hashtags: Customize Sign 2 to advertise your presence on social media. Publish a few #3wordbooktalk examples and share or "like" others.

Activity Resources

Activity 2: Fantasy Maps Quiz

Introduction

How well do you know your epic fantasy worlds? Test your map-reading skills here!

Books to Display

  • The Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson
  • Graceling by Kristin Cashore
  • The Demon King by Cinda Williams Chima
  • Seraphina by Rachel Hartman
  • The Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan
  • Finnikin of the Rock by Melina Marchetta
  • Dragonflight by Anne McCaffrey
  • The Burning Sky by Sherry Thomas

Supply List

  • 20 templates and 1 instruction sheet (printed on cardstock)
  • 1 craft knife
  • Bulletin board or large poster board

Description

This is an interactive display that encourages teens to use their knowledge of fantasy and YA literature while subtly recommending books that may appeal to them. Begin by printing the quiz question templates and instructions on cardstock or similarly thick paper. If you're concerned about the cost of special paper, print only the FRONT pages on cardstock.

Use a craft knife to cut along dotted lines on FRONT pages, creating flaps that can be lifted to reveal hints or answers. Paste the FRONT pages over corresponding BACK pages so that hints and answers are aligned with flaps. Be sure that the FRONT and BACK pages match. Arrange quiz questions and instructions on a bulletin board or poster board as desired. See the "visualization" document for an illustration of this arrangement.

Activity Resources

Activity 3: Make-Your-Own Map Contest

Introduction

Do you have the imagination and skill it takes to make a map from scratch? Submit your original drawing here and see your stuff in a mini art gallery – and maybe even win a prize!

Books to Display

  • Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo
  • The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara by Terry Brooks
  • A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. LeGuin
  • The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
  • Sabriel by Garth Nix
  • Wild Magic by Tamora Pierce
  • Mistborn by Brandon Sanderson
  • The Burning Sky by Sherry Thomas
  • Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkein

Supply List

Part 1 – Submissions

    • 1 plastic sign holder for displaying program signs
    • Program Signs (see resources)
    • 1 bowl
    • Labels, printed with template (see resources)
    • Heavier-weight art paper suggested, but plain printing paper will do
    • Counter, table, shelf top, or other surface on which to place display

Part 2 – Voting

    • 1 voting box, such as a shoe box wrapped securely in newspaper with a slot in the lid
    • 1 voting instruction sheet (see resources)
    • Paper, cut into strips
    • Pencils
    • Bulletin board or large poster board
    • Labels or sticky notes, so that each submission can be numbered for voting
    • Counter, table, shelf top, or other surface on which to place voting materials
    • Inexpensive mats or backs for submitted art, optional

Detailed Description of Activity

This is a 2-part student/patron-driven art contest that encourages teens to practice geography and art skills and appreciation.

Part 1 - Submissions

Choose a start and end date for submissions; include this in the appropriate spot on the provided Sign 1 template.

Print labels using the provided Label template and cut these into individual labels that you'll make available for students/patrons to take from the bowl. You'll use these labels to identify winners and allow participants to reclaim their artworks at the end of the program.

Place the sign, labels, and art paper on a flat surface near a staff desk or other observable area. This will encourage students/patrons to ask questions if they have any and will discourage non-program-related expensive art paper misappropriation. If you're concerned about said misappropriation, provide only a few pages at a time and replenish the supply as needed.

Part 2 - Voting

Choose a start and end date for voting and include this in the appropriate spot on the provided Sign 2 template.

Number each submission and label them for voting purposes. If the artist did not follow directions and signed the front of the artwork, you may be able to use the number label to cover the signature. However, use caution with number label placement to avoid damaging the artworks. If matting or backing the art, do so at this time.

Prepare your ballot box and voting slips. Arrange the voting instructions and artworks on a bulletin board or similar "art gallery" style display area; this should be next to a counter or should include a small table for voting materials.

After voting is concluded, contact the winner to arrange for prize pick-up. You may also wish to contact all participants to let them know that the contest is concluded and they can pick up their artworks at the library within a reasonable time frame.

Incentives

  • 1 art supply pack for contest winner which might include: Sketchbook, Charcoal pencils, Graphite pencils, Colored pencils, Watercolor paper, Watercolor pencils, Watercolor paint set, Paint brushes set

Resources

 
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Created on Apr 5, 2015 | Last updated July 15, 2015