Author Feature-P. J. Hoover

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

Middle School

Featured Author

P J Hoover

P. J. Hoover

Tut: The Story of My Immortal Life

PJ Hoover was an electrical engineer for fifteen years before becoming a writer. When she is not writing, she spends her time practicing kung fu, playing Wizard101 and watching Star Trek. She can solve Rubik's Cubes (including the 2x2, 3x3, 4x4 and 5x5). She lives in Texas with her husband and two children. 


 

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Book Trailer


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Book Quiz

Printable Copy

  1. Who was trying to remove Tut from the throne?
    1. Set
    2. Horemheb
    3. Horus
    4. Anubis
  2. Where was the obelisk that exploded?
    1. The National Mall
    2. Arlington
    3. Pentagon City
    4. Dupont Circle
  3. What is Colonel Cody?
    1. A god
    2. A shabti
    3. The god Horus
    4. Another immortal
  4. Which book did Tut need power from?
    1. Book of the Egyptians
    2. Egyptian Mythology
    3. Book of the Dead
    4. Tut's Guide to Immortality
  5. What type of business does Isis own?
    1. Nursing home
    2. Funeral home
    3. Car dealership
    4. Cleaning business
  6. What did Tut have to do to open the scroll?
    1. Let a drop of his blood fall onto it
    2. Chant the verse that Horus taught him
    3. Dance to the song "Walk Like an Egyptian"
    4. Wave a jewel over it.
  7. What was inside the pizza box?
    1. Pizza
    2. Cobras
    3. Scorpions
    4. Asps
  8. What object is Tut looking for?
    1. A knife
    2. A fork
    3. A sword
    4. A scroll
  9. Who did Isis say has the object?
    1. Set
    2. Osiris
    3. Gilgamesh
    4. Tia
  10. What building burned?
    1. The Smithsonian National Zoological Park
    2. The Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum
    3. The Smithsonian National Museum of African Art
    4. The Smithsonian National Gallery of Art 


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Academic Program 

Printable Copy

Traveling Through History

Introduction/Purpose of Program

Students will select and research a person and a time period from history. They will take the information found and write a short story that places the person in that time period. (Example: Julius Caesar / Industrial Revolution) 

TEKS

  • ELA6 110.18: 15a, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25; TechApps6 126.14: 3a SS 113.18: 21, 22b, 22d
  • ELA7 110.19: 15a, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25; TechApps7 126.15: 3a
  • ELA8 110.20: 15a, 20 22, 23, 24, 25; TechApps8 126.16: 3a
  • ELA, Reading 110.25: 5a,
  • ELA, Speech 110.26: 4a, 4f

Detailed Description of the Program

Students will draw or choose from a list of historical figures and time periods. Students will research their historical figure and their time period. They will then write a short story that places their historical figure in that time period. (For example, Charles Babbage living in the 1990s)

Students need to keep in mind what their historical figure's interests were. How would that translate to the time period they travel to? Have them create a list of questions that they need to answer in their short story. Using the example of Charles Babbage, the pioneer of Computer Science, in the 1990s. What are his thoughts about the technology available in 1990 as compared to the technology they had when he was alive from 1791-1871? Does he know if he directly had an effect on what is available?)

Program Related Books to Display or Book Talk

  • Tut: The Story of My Immortal Life by P.J. Hoover (9780765334688)
  • Who was ? series 
  • Books about the historical figures listed (See Resources)

List of Supplies

  • Paper
  • Pencils
  • Computers
  • Databases (if access is available)
  • Reference books
  • List of historical figures and time periods

Resources

 

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Active Programs

Printable Copy

Egyptian Olympics

Introduction/Purpose of Program

This is a celebration of all things Egyptian. Patrons will be placed in teams to compete in Egyptian themed games/contests.

Detailed Description of the Program

Patrons will be placed in teams to compete in Egyptian themed games/contests. Teams will earn points for each place they earn. 1st = 3pts., 2nd = 2 pts., 3rd = 1pt. (This can be adjusted for each team to get points.)

Games

Mummy Wrap – Patrons use rolls of toilet paper to wrap another patron up to resemble a mummy. This game can be timed or the team that finishes first wins.

Pin the Head on the Sphinx – Begin with a large pyramid placed on the wall. Blindfold one player and spin them in circles until they get a bit dizzy. Have them try and place the Sphinx head on the pyramid. Leave the heads on until everyone has had a chance. The person with the head closest to where it belongs wins.

Walk Like an Egyptian – Have everyone begin the day walking like an Egyptian everywhere they go. If the patron forgets, they are out. Have some way of keeping track of who is in or out, maybe use a sticker or pin that they have to give up when called out.

Build a Pyramid – Have patrons build a pyramid using cups. Patrons must use a minimum number of cups to create their pyramids. Winners can be determined by time period or first to finish their pyramid. For an added level of difficulty, require patrons to build a 3D pyramid with a square base.

Snake Making – Have patrons make as many snakes as possible out of clay/playdoh. Give a time limit and length that the snakes must be. Winners are the group that makes the most.

Cleopatra Eye – Patrons must recreate Cleopatra's eye on another member of their group.

Obstacle Course – Create an obstacle course for patrons to race through. Consider combining Egyptian locations like a Nile river or pyramids with landmarks from Washington DC.

Hieroglyphic Name – Using the website http://discoveringegypt.com/egyptian-hieroglyphic-awriting/hieroglyphic-typewriter/ and cutouts of hieroglyphics, have teams place the appropriate hieroglyphic letter in the correct order to spell their team name. For an add challenge have each team member spell their name.

List of Supplies

  • Decorations (blue, gold, and black)
  • Hieroglyphics welcome
  • Toilet paper
  • Pins or stickers
  • Cups
  • Clay/playdoh
  • Eye makeup (eyeliner, eye shadow, and mascara)
  • Copy of Cleopatra's eye
  • Obstacle course materials
  • Hieroglyphics letters (6 copies of cutout letters)
  • Optional: prizes

Resources (print and electronic)

Professional Resources (for librarian and teacher use)

Program Flyers, Posters, Advertisements, Bulletin Board Ideas, Templates, Rubrics, etc.

 

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Passive Programs 

Printable Copy

Egyptian Figures

Introduction/Purpose of Program

Patrons will design a shabti to be displayed in the library's shabti army or design a scarab.

Detailed Description of the Program

Patrons will design or create a shabti or scarab. Optional: Patrons can create a 3D Shabti or scarab using found items. (Scarabs could be made into a piece of jewelry.)

Program Related Books to Display or Book Talk

  • Janes, Glenn, and Tom Bangbala. Shabtis: A Private View: Ancient Egyptian Funerary Statuettes in European Private Collections. Paris: Cybele, 2002. Print.
  • Netzley, Patricia D. The Curse of King Tut. San Diego, CA: Lucent, 2000. Print.
  • Newberry, Percy E. Egyptian Scarabs. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, 2002. Print.
  • Regula, DeTraci, and Kerigwen. Sacred Scarabs: For Divination and Personal Power. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 2001. Print.
  • Wilkinson, Richard H. Egyptian Scarabs. Oxford: Shire Publications, 2008. Print.
  • Wilkinson, Richard H. Egyptian Scarabs. Oxford: Shire Publications, 2008. Print.

List of Supplies

  • Copies of Shabti coloring page
  • Copies of Scarab coloring page
  • Crayons
  • Colored Pencils
  • Paint
  • Paint brushes
  • Scissors
  • Optional for 3D objects: Polymer clay, wire, paper, paper mache, clay, metal pieces, anything you can imagine to make a 3D shabti or scarab.

Resources (print and electronic)

 

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Created on Apr 13, 2015 | Last updated July 15, 2015