Author Feature-David Liss

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

Middle School

Featured Author

David Liss

David Liss

Randoms

 

David Liss is a proud science fiction geek. When not acting like a total fanboy, he’s generally working on his books, stories, and comics. Liss has written eight bestselling novels for adults, most recently The Day of Atonement, and is the author of numerous comics, including Mystery Men, Sherlock Holmes: Moriarty Lives, and Angelica Tomorrow. He lives in San Antonio, Texas.


 

Find him on the web:

Twitter

Website

 


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Book Trailer

 


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Book Quiz

Randoms

Printable Copy

Answer Key


 

1.  Dr. Roop is an alien from the

 

  1. United Federation of Planets
  2. Confederation of United Planets
  3. Confederation of States
  4. United Planets of Space

 

2.   For which of the following reasons was Zeke chosen?

 

  1. Because he is an American boy
  2. Because he is between 11 to 13 years old.
  3. Because he is random
  4. All of the above.

 

3.  Why did Zeke finally decide to go on the trip?

 

  1. It sounded exciting.
  2. They didn’t give him much choice.
  3. His mother is sick and they offered him a cure.
  4. He is a sci-fi geek.

 

4.   How did Zeke save the spaceship Dependable?

 

  1. He used what he learned when he played games with Mr. Urch.
  2. He broke the rules and used multiple dark matter missiles.
  3. He destroyed a spaceship.
  4. All of the above.

 

5.  Why do the other humans treat Zeke badly?

 

  1. Because he has other friends.
  2. Because he has more points than they do.
  3. Because historically, teams that ostracize their random member score higher.
  4. All of the above.

 

6. Who were the Formers?

 

  1. The Confederation members
  2. The previous groups of participants
  3. The leaders of the Confederation
  4. Ancient people who created technology used in the Confederation.

 

7.  What is a HUD?

 

  1. Human Ultra Device
  2. Heads Up Display
  3. Hard Utilization Display
  4. Hands Up Display

 

8.  Dr. Roop told Zeke, ‘Generally, we frown on direct cognitive data integration...”  What did he mean?

 

  1. The Confederation dislikes learning by reading information.
  2. The Confederation dislikes directly including information.
  3. The Confederation dislikes direct circuits.
  4. The Confederation dislikes thinking.

 

9.  Why did the Phandic Empire want Zeke extradited?

 

  1. They said he didn’t rate as well as the other participants.
  2. They wanted him tried with wanton destruction of life and property.
  3. They wanted him to work for them.
  4. They wanted him to go back to Earth.

 

10.  What was the name of the girl that Zeke likes?

 

  1. Tamret
  2. Ardov
  3. Thiel
  4. Nayana

 

Matching:

 

 

 

Write the letter of the correct match next to each problem.

 

 
 
1. _____ augmented               a. A machine or robot built on the nanoscale
 
 
 
2. _____ integration                b. Act of combining
 
 
 
3. _____ ascent                      c. clear; transparent
 
 
 
4. _____ data                          d. To go upward
 
 
 
5. _____ translucent               e. Eye ball
 
 
 
6. _____ ergonomics              f. Information, statistics, facts
 
 
 
7. _____ confederation           g. Increased
 
 
 
8. _____ ocular orb                 h. The act or process of pretending; feigning
 
 
 
9. _____ simulation                 i. A league or alliance
 
 
 
10._____ nanites                    j. Human engineering

 

 


 

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Academic Program

 

Printable Copy of Program

Program Flyer

Comic Rubric


 

Introduction: In Randoms, the random kids are targeted merely because they are not gifted in some way like the other participants. In this program, students will use creative skills and/or technology to demonstrate their knowledge of bullying prevention.

 

 

Title: Superheroes Stop Bullying

 

Activity Introduction: After a study of Bullying Prevention students will use that knowledge to create a comic strip or short graphic novel that shows a bullying situation and a way to resolve that situation.

 

 

Activity TEKS:

115.7. Health Education, Grade 5:10a, 10b, 10c, 10d, 10e
 
115.22. Health Education, Grade 6:12a, 12b, 12c, 12d
 
126.14. Technology Applications, Grade 6:1a, 1b, 1c, 1d
 
117.117 Art, Grade 5: 2a, 2b, 2c
 
117.117.Art, Middle School 1: 2a, 2b, 2c

 

Detailed Description:

To culminate the bullying prevention unit the students will create a comic online, in an application, or on paper to demonstrate their knowledge ways to stop a bullying situation.
 
Length of program: varies from 1 to 4 days, depending on the level of detail in the requirements of the teacher.
 
Suggested requirements: See Superheroes Stop Bullying Rubric
 
Comic strip formats:
 
Technology related: Pixton, Storyboard That, Make Beliefs Comix, Comic Master, Witty Comics, Write Comics
 
Standard: paper, colored pencils

 

 

 

Books to Display or Book Talk:

Fiction:

Anywhere but Paradise by Bustard, Anne.

Divergent by Roth, Veronica.

Cinder by Meyer, Marissa.

Gutless by Deuker, Carl.

Middle School, the Worst Years of My Life by Patterson, James.

The Outsiders by Hinton, S.E.

Randoms by David Liss.

Stargirl by Spinelli, Jerry.

 

Non-Fiction, available through TexQuest electronic resources, TexQuest.net: Ebsco eBooks

Discover Manga Drawing: 30 Easy Lessons for Drawing Guys and Girls by Galea, Mario

Aliens, Series: You Can Draw It, by Rosier, Maggie.

The Skinny on Bullying: The Legend of Gretchen, by Cassidy, Mike.

Bullying Under Attack: True Stories Written by Teen Victims, Bullies & Bystanders, Authors: Sperber, Emily; Alexander, Heather; Meyer, Stephanie H.; Meyer, John

How Can I Deal with Bullying? : A Book About Respect, by Donovan, Sandra

 

 

 

Activity Supply List:

computers or tablets

color printer

Paper

colored pencils

Preparation: Choose and test a platform or locate paper and pencils. Find electronic resources as desired and download them or save the links. Pull related books from the library. Print or save in Google Classroom the rubric adjusted to your specific choices. Decide whether you want or need the students to work as individuals or in small groups.

 

 

Activities:

Day 1: Present project as culmination to bullying unit. Explain the use of comic strip platform and/or TexQuest electronic resources, TexQuest.net, Ebsco ebooks. Give the students the rubric or post it online.

Day 2 & 3: Work on Comics

Day 4: Present comics to class.

Example:

Comic from Pow! How Comics in the Classroom Can Combat Bullying, Edutopia, Oct. 3, 2011.

 

Incentives:

Comic to take or display.

 

Activity Resources:

How to Create Simple Comics on Pixton from Free Technology for Teachers by Richard Byrne   http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2016/09/how-to-create-simple-comics-on-pixton.html - .WJY6hxiZPgE

4 Browser-based Tools for Creating Comic Strips from Free Technology for Teachers by Richard Byrne   http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2016/09/4-browser-based-tools-for-creating.html - .WJY_8BiZPgE

Pow! How Comics in the Classroom Can Combat Bullying https://www.edutopia.org/blog/bully-prevention-comic-strips-suzie-boss

Superheros Stop Bullying Rubric

 

 

 

 

 


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Active Program

 

Printable Copy 

Activity Introduction

Everyone has been bullied at some point.  Even Zeke; even after he saved the lives of everyone on the Dependable.  Let us explore the effects of bullying.

This will probably require two (2) one-hour sessions or one long session.

Extension: Patrons can share the pictures created on a bulletin board - with or without their names on the images.

Detailed Description of Activity #1 – Bullied Heart

Icebreaker

Play the “Telephone” game.

                Tell the class that it is always important to have good communication between themselves and their guardians or other adults. Without good communication, there is no way to signal to the parents that the youth is in trouble.

To demonstrate the importance of good communication, explain to the class that they are going to play a game called “Telephone.” Have the students make a circle around the room. The facilitator marks the beginning of the circle. Explain to them that the facilitator will whisper a message into the student directly to the left of them. Have the student pass the message on by whispering it to the person sitting to the left of them. The student is only allowed to say the message once and the next person must pass on what they heard. This process continues until the message goes around the entire room.

Have the last person state the message aloud. What usually happens is that the message changed a little as it traveled around the room, preventing the original message from being delivered to the last person.

State that this was an example of the importance of having good communication. Any message is clearer if they speak directly to their parents as opposed to waiting until someone else tells them about the problem.

Activity #1

1. Place students into group of at least four and give everyone a large sheet of newsprint and markers.

2. Explain to students that they are going to do a lesson that you need them to take seriously because the topic of the lesson is bullying and everyone has been bullied before at some time in their life.

3. If you want, ask students to close their eyes, put their heads down on their desk and listen for your instruction. Ask them to raise their hand if you have ever been bullied, or made fun of, heard people say bad things about your skin color or religion. You have a choice to either tell the students to keep their hands up and open their eyes or you can just report back to them that everyone’s hands were up. In six years I have never had a class where there was someone who didn’t raise their hand.

4. Pass out the worksheet “The Bullied Heart” (or blank paper) to each group and read aloud “The Heart” section below. Allow students time to complete each section of the Heart Exercise (5-10 minutes each). At the end of the activity, have students debrief first with their group by answering the questions on page 2 of their worksheet. Then have the class debrief together and have each group volunteer their answers.  Alternatively, you may choose to have the groups complete the entire activity before sharing.  You may also choose to post students’ work on the board or wall so students can see the similarity that each group had with each other.

 

The Heart

On your paper, draw a large heart that fills up the middle.

Each of us begins life as a baby depending on others to care for us. Imagine that you are holding a newborn baby- what words or thoughts come to mind- write them down inside your heart. If you need a little help, type the words “cute babies” into an image search and then describe what you see. When you have at least 10 words in your heart, describe the feelings you experienced when writing down the words about on the back of your sheet.

 

Hurts

As we continue the journey from infant to young child we often have things said to us by adults that are not so nice to hear and cause shame and embarrassment.  Go to the webpage  http://to.pbs.org/18H3Alk and choose 10 to 15 student stories to listen to. Listen to the stories and for each unkind words/phrases that were said to the students you chose draw a slash through your heart and write the specific hurtful word on the slash. See the heart below:

Then reflect on your own experiences and add words or phrases you have heard and draw a slash for each one, as was done for those to whom you listened.  If you are having trouble thinking of these words, use these questions to help you get started:

 

Have you ever been made fun of? What was said to you?

Think of people who have a disability or are not good at certain subjects in school- what do teachers and fellow students say to them?

What if someone speaks with an accent or doesn’t speak “proper” English

What if a child was born with a big body?

What if someone has different clothing?

What if a person has a different religion from most people or different traditions?

What if people have a different color of skin or different culture- What are they called or teased about? What bad things are girls called, how about boys?

What if your family doesn’t have very much money?

What if someone is transgender or gay? What is said to them?

 What feelings do you have after writing down all those hurtful words? On the back of your paper, describe those feelings.

 

Shields

When people are called these words enough they often start to believe them and find ways to shield themselves from the pain.  For example, someone who is being called stupid might act silly or stop talking in class. When you are teased or made fun of what do you feel like doing? Think back to the students you heard from and write down ways they coped with bullying. For each behavior students used to shield themselves from the pain draw a shield/line between the hurtful words and the ways that people cope with feeling badly about themselves. See the example below:

How can putting up walls can lead to negative behavior including things that may numb the pain, but not improve the situation?  Do you see examples of people who are coping with bullying around you? What does that look like? On back of your paper, describe your responses to those questions.

 

 

Assessing the Damage

To reflect on your experience, answer the following questions:

1.   Remember how your heart looked and felt in the first part of this exercise? Describe it.

2.   How did your heart change once it had been called bad names?

3.   How hard is it to get back to the original innocent heart once walls have been put up to protect it from dealing with the pain?

4.   How did it make you feel to watch the students on SRL talk about being bullied?

Detailed Description of Activity #2 – Healing Heart
(Activity adapted from Safaria, Triantoro, and Astrid Yunita. "The Efficacy of Art Therapy to Reduce Anxiety among Bullying Victims." International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology 3.4 (2014): 77-88. 13 Aug. 2014. Web. 27 Feb. 2017. http://www.consortiacademia.org/index.php/ijrsp/article/viewFile/829/389)

 

Students will learn that problems can be solved with help and represent their anxiety/fear through images.

“Crossing the river” exercise.  In their previous groups or new ones, have the students solve this puzzle:
A farmer has to get a fox, a chicken and a sack of corn across a river.

He has a boat, which carries him and one other thing.
If the fox and the chicken are left together, the fox will eat the chicken.

If the chicken and corn are left together, the chicken will eat the corn.

If the farmer is there, all is well.

Solution:

Farmer takes chicken across

Comes back

Farmer takes fox across

Comes back with chicken

Farmer takes corn across

Comes back

Farmer takes chicken

Explain that we all need help from time to time, and in bullying circumstances especially.  Working with someone for a solution to the problem is one way of addressing the situation.

With the idea of "some things you fear,” have students use pencils or other creative utensils to symbolize this theme on paper.  The representation can be realistic (a person, a building, an object, etc.) or abstract (with colors, sharp lines, etc.).

On the back of the illustration, have the students write the words that may describe the representation.  This may include feelings, a story, or the actual “thing.”

Students may need a break at this point.  An opportunity to relax, eat, or use the restroom, may be appropriate.  The facilitator may even have the students crumple or destroy the depiction.

This time, the theme of “safe place” should be created on another piece of paper.  Again, the representation can be realistic (a person, a building, an object, etc.) or abstract (with colors, sharp lines, etc.).

And, again, on the back of the illustration, have the students write the words that may describe the representation.  This may include feelings, a story, or the actual “thing.”

Without pushing them, have the students share how they felt during the “some things you fear” undertaking versus the “safe place” activity.

Books to Display

Fiction

Cerra,    Kerry O'Malley.  Just a drop of water.  New York : Sky Pony Press, [2014].

Craft, Jerry with Jaylen Craft and Aren Craft. The offenders : saving the world while serving detention!  Norwalk [Conn.] : Mama's Boyz, Inc, [2014].

Folan, Karyn Langhorne. Pretty Ugly (Bluford Series). West Berlin, NJ : Townsend Press, [2011].
Klass, David. Stuck on Earth. New York : Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 2010.

Lennon, M. T.  Confessions of a so-called middle child.  New York, NY : Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, [2013].

Medina, Meg. Yaqui Delgado wants to kick your ass. Somerville, Mass. : Candlewick Press, 2014.

Miller, Ashley Edward and Zack Stentz. Colin Fischer. New York : Razorbill, 2012.

Nielsen, Susin. We are all made of molecules  New York : Wendy Lamb Books, [2015].

Patterson, James and Chris Grabenstein.  I funny.  New York : Little, Brown and Co., 2012.

Rylander, Chris. The fourth stall. New York : Walden Pond Press, [2011].

Stevens, Eric [Jake Maddox]. Board battle.  North Mankato, Minn. : Capstone Stone Arch Books, [2014].

Stevens, Eric [Jake Maddox]. Paintball problems. North Mankato, Minn. : Capstone Stone Arch Books, [2014].

Non-fiction

Criswell, Patti Kelley. Stand up for yourself & your friends : dealing with bullies and bossiness, and finding a better way.  Middleton, WI : American Girl Pub., [2009].

Landau, Jennifer.  Dealing with bullies, cliques, and social stress (Series: Middle school survival handbook).  New York : Rosen Central, 2013.

Nelson, Drew.  Dealing with cyberbullies (Series: Cyberspace survival guide).  New York : Gareth Stevens Pub., 2013.

Shapiro, Ouisie. Bullying and me : schoolyard stories. Chicago : Albert Whitman, c2010.

Winkler, Kathleen. Are you being bullied? (Series: Got issues?). Berkeley Heights, NJ : Enslow Publishers, Inc., [2015].

 

Activity Supply List

A computer or device capable of showing short video clips.

Blank paper - or Bullied Heart worksheet.

Writing utensil(s).

 

Incentives

A final product.

 

Activity Resources 

Bullied Heart worksheet

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Bullying: The Heart Exercise for Individuals Lesson Plan. http://scetv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/b0c3d35c-d40a-4d72-9067-4025bc9c70cc/bullyingthe-heart-exercise-for-groups-lesson-plan/

 


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Passive Programs 

 

Printable Copy 

 

Activity #1 Title

BuiLD YouR WiLD SeLF

 

Activity Introduction

In Randoms, the author describes many of the species Zeke Reynolds encounters.  In this activity, patrons can create images similar to these people - or create something new.

 

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Go to http://www.buildyourwildself.com/

Read the instructions on the screen:

First, select your human self.

Then, choose your animal parts and go wild.

Click ‘I’m done’ to save your creation as your desktop [an image] or share your wild self with a friend.

Click ‘Start.’

Enter your name in the box next to “Build Your Wild Self.”

Complete your creation, or click “Go Random.”

You can email the image to yourself or a friend, save as an image, (and/or print it-if desired)

Or, try your hand at drawing your own!

 

Books to Display

See Read-A-Like List

 

 

 

Activity Supply List

A computer or device (connected to a color printer-if desired).

And/or blank paper with drawing and coloring utensils.

 

Incentives

 

A final product.

 

 

 

Activity Resources (Produced by the Committee)

 

 

 

 

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

 

None other than the BuiLD YouR WiLD SeLFsite.

 

=================================

 

 

 

Activity #2 Title

 

Touchdown

 

Activity Introduction

In Randoms, Zeke and his friends fly a stolen artifact carrier from Confederation Central to the planet with the Phandic prison.  To land as undetected as possible, they “... cut the engines to drop down hard and fast to the surface …” In this activity, patrons will design a shock-absorbing system that will protect two passengers when they land.

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Read the “touchdown” activity pdf.  This can be done without an adult facilitator.

Gather the supplies listed below.  (The supply list is enough to build ONE lander.)

Display or print the “touchdown_worksheet” for the patrons to use while building.

 

Books to Display

See Read-A-Like List

Some current events readings from newspapers and magazines (via ProQuest SIRS Discoverer/TexQuest):

China Launches Its Longest Crewed Space Mission Yet

Lincoln Courier; Oct 17, 2016; Lexile Measure: 1350; Grade Levels: 11,12

 "Two Chinese astronauts began the country's longest crewed space mission yet...blasting off on a spacecraft for a 30-day stay on an experimental space station as China steadfastly navigates its way to becoming a space superpower....The launch is China's sixth manned mission, the previous longest being about two weeks." (Lincoln Courier) Read more about China's latest space mission.

There May Be 10 Times As Many Galaxies in Universe As Scientists...

Washington Post; Oct 16, 2016; Lexile Measure: 1270; Grade Levels: 10,11,12

 "The universe is much more crowded than scientists thought. Previous estimates, based on Hubble Deep Field images captured by the satellite telescope in the mid-1990s, suggested that around 100 billion or 200 billion galaxies swirled within the observable universe. But a new analysis suggests a figure 10 times higher than that: There might be 2 trillion galaxies, 90 percent of which are too faint for our most sensitive telescopes to detect." (Washington Post) Read more about the observations of galaxies in the universe.

New Earth-Like Planet Found

NewsCurrents Read to Know; Sep 5, 2016; Lexile Measure: 930; Grade Levels: 4,5,6

 "For a long time, scientists have been searching for habitable planets or moons. 'Habitable' means it is a place that can support life. Now, scientists think they might have found one of these habitable worlds relatively close to us!" (NewsCurrents Read to Know) Read more about the discovery of this planet.

The Pale Red Dot: Proxima b

World Book Online Behind the Headlines; Aug 31, 2016; Lexile Measure: 1110; Grade Levels: 7,8,9,10

 "On August 24 [2016], scientists from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) announced that they had discovered an extrasolar (beyond our solar system) planet, or exoplanet, that may harbor conditions favorable to life. This exoplanet, called Proxima b, orbits Proxima Centauri, the star closest to the sun." (World Book Online Behind the Headlines) Read about the exoplanet Proxima b.

Mars Simulation Crew 'Return to Earth' After 365 Days in Isolation

CNN Wire Service; Aug 29, 2016; Lexile Measure: 1510; Grade Levels: 11,12

 "A crew of intrepid astronauts have emerged after a year on Mars...kind of. Six scientists spent 365 days in a geodesic dome set in a Mars-like environment 8,200 feet (2,500 meters) above sea level. The simulated habitat was located on the slopes of Mauna Loa, a volcano in Hawaii." (CNN Wire Service) Read about this Mars simulation project.

Moving to Mars

Highlights for Children; Aug 2016; Lexile Measure: 580; Grade Levels: 2,3

 Read a story about a family who move to the planet Mars.

Newly Discovered Dwarf Planet Takes 700 Years to Orbit the Sun

CNN Wire Service; Jul 12, 2016; Lexile Measure: 1330; Grade Levels: 10,11,12

 "A new dwarf planet has been discovered in the icy realms of space beyond Neptune...." (CNN Wire Service) Read about the discovery of the dwarf planet called RR245.

Inflatable 'Bedroom' Attached to Space Station

CNN Wire Service; Apr 16, 2016; Lexile Measure: 1160; Grade Levels: 8,9,10

 "A prototype that may one day usher an era of space hotels has successfully been attached to the International Space Station....Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) is the first test module to ever attach to the space station. The prototype was one of the highly anticipated experiments SpaceX launched into orbit earlier in April [2016]." (CNN Wire Service)Read more about this inflatable module being tested on the International Space Station.

NASA Experiments with Expandable Module, Veggies off to Space Station

CNN Wire Service; Apr 7, 2016; Lexile Measure: 1140; Grade Levels: 8,9,10

 "There's a reason why the International Space Station is close to Earth. If something goes wrong, it only takes a few days to come back home. But what happens when we venture further into deep space, to Mars and beyond? That's one of the big questions that has inspired NASA to send up a whole new set of experiments....From growing vegetables on other planets to launching a new habitat in orbit, NASA is on a quest to make these scenarios realities in the future as it seeks to be less Earth-dependent." (CNN Wire Service) Read about the latest experiments sent to the International Space Station.

Tired of Life on Earth? Maybe You Can Be One of the First Humans to...

Washington Post; Apr 5, 2016; Lexile Measure: 1110; Grade Levels: 7,8,9,10

 "Tired of your normal routine of homework and chores? Bored by the tick-tock of Earth's seasons? Well, how about a trip to Mars, a world away from life here on Earth? It would take six to eight months' travel by rocket, if the planet is lined up with Earth in the right way, but if you don't mind the wait and the risks, you could be among the first humans to set foot on the Red Planet." (Washington Post) Read about plans to send humans to Mars in the 2030s.

A Star Is Born

National Geographic Explorer!; Apr 2016; Lexile Measure: 770; Grade Levels: 3,4

 "Stars made the oxygen we breathe and the iron in our blood. When these stars died, they cast oxygen, iron, and other materials into space. These elements eventually became space clouds called nebulae. Over time, new stars and planets formed in them." (National Geographic Explorer!) Learn more about stars and nebula.

NASA Gravity Map Offers Closest Ever Look at Mars

CNN Wire Service; Mar 24, 2016; Lexile Measure: 1400; Grade Levels: 11,12

 "By tracking the gravitational pull on spacecraft over Mars, NASA has created one of the most detailed maps yet of the Red Planet's surface, and what lies beneath....As well as providing insight for future missions, the gravity map also offers explanations for developments in the planet's past." (CNN Wire Service) Read more about this Mars gravity map.

Scott Kelly's Year In Space

NewsCurrents Read to Know; Mar 14, 2016; Lexile Measure: 1170; Grade Levels: 8,9,10

 "NASA astronaut Scott Kelly recently returned to Earth after spending 340 consecutive days in space living aboard the International Space Station, or ISS. This was a record for an American astronaut. The ISS is a spacecraft that orbits Earth. Visiting spaceships can dock, or land, at the ISS. Scientists and astronauts come aboard the ISS to do research. This huge spacecraft has been continually occupied for more than 15 years by scientists from 17 different nations." (NewsCurrents Read to Know) Read more about Astronaut Scott Kelly's year in space.

One Giant Leap
Los Angeles Times; Dec 23, 2015; Lexile Measure: 1200; Grade Levels: 9,10,11,12

 "When Elon Musk's SpaceX rocket nailed its historic landing at Florida's Cape Canaveral...and the enormous dust cloud settled, it was more than an engineering feat hailed around the world. The Falcon 9's landing made deep space travel seem attainable again -- not just to aerospace engineers and astronauts but to the masses." (Los Angeles Times) Read more about the successful landing of the SpaceX Falcon 9.

Jeff Bezos' Rocket Lands Safely After Space Flight

CNN Wire Service; Nov 24, 2015; Lexile Measure: 1080; Grade Levels: 7,8,9,10

 "Jeff Bezos' rocket ship achieved a breakthrough...by traveling 329,839 feet into outer space and then landing upright upon its return to earth....Amazon founder Bezos started his space company, Blue Origin, in the hopes of using his New Shepard rocket to carry tourists into space." (CNN Wire Service) Read more about Bezos' rockets and his plans for space tourism.

 

Activity Supply List
1 piece of stiff paper or cardboard - approximately 4 x 5 in (10 x 13 cm) (per lander)
1 8 oz - 12 oz paper or plastic cup (per lander)
3 index cards - 3 x 5 in (8 x 13 cm) (per lander)
2 regular marshmallows (per lander)
10 miniature marshmallows (per lander)
3 rubber bands (per lander)
8 plastic straws (per lander)
Scissors
Tape (1 meter per lander)
Challenge sheet (touchdown_worksheet) - download PDF



Incentives

A final product.

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) at the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) activity site: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/touchdown/

NASA website - https://www.nasa.gov/

 

=========================================================

 

Activity #3 Title

Bullied Heart

 

Activity Introduction

 

Everyone has been bullied at some point.  Even Zeke; even after he saved the lives of everyone on the Dependable.  Let us explore the effects of bullying.

Extension: Patrons can share the picture of their heart on a bulletin board - with or without their names on the sheet.

 

Detailed Description of Activity

 

The Heart

On your paper, draw a large heart that fills up the middle.

Each of us begins life as a baby depending on others to care for us. Imagine that you are holding a newborn baby- what words or thoughts come to mind- write them down inside your heart. If you need a little help, type the words “cute babies” into an image search and then describe what you see. When you have at least 10 words in your heart, describe the feelings you experienced when writing down the words about on the back of your sheet.

 

Hurts 

As we continue the journey from infant to young child we often have things said to us by adults that are not so nice to hear and cause shame and embarrassment.  Go to the webpage  http://to.pbs.org/18H3Alk and choose 10 to 15 student stories to listen to. Listen to the stories and for each unkind words/phrases that were said to the students you chose draw a slash through your heart and write the specific hurtful word on the slash. See the heart below:

Then reflect on your own experiences and add words or phrases you have heard and draw a slash for each one, as was done for those to whom you listened.  If you are having trouble thinking of these words, use these questions to help you get started:

 

Have you ever been made fun of? What was said to you?

Think of people who have a disability or are not good a certain subjects in school- what do teachers and fellow students say to them?

What if someone speaks with an accent or doesn’t speak “proper” English

What if a child was born with a big body?

What if someone has different clothing?

What if a person has a different religion from most people or different traditions?

What if people have a different color of skin or different culture- What are they called or teased about? What bad things are girls called, how about boys?

What if your family doesn’t have very much money?

What if someone is transgender or gay? What is said to them?

 

What feelings do you have after writing down all those hurtful words? On the back of your paper, describe those feelings.

 

Shields

When people are called these words enough they often start to believe them and find ways to shield themselves from the pain.  For example, someone who is being called stupid might act silly or stop talking in class. When you are teased or made fun of what do you feel like doing? Think back to the students you heard from and write down ways they coped with bullying. For each behavior students used to shield themselves from the pain draw a shield/line between the hurtful words and the ways that people cope with feeling badly about themselves. See the example below:

 How can putting up walls can lead to negative behavior including things that may numb the pain, but not improve the situation?  Do you see examples of people who are coping with bullying around you? What does that look like? On back of your paper, describe your responses to those questions.

 

Assessing the Damage

To reflect on your experience, answer the following questions:

1.   Remember how your heart looked and felt in the first part of this exercise? Describe it.

2.   How did your heart change once it had been called bad names?

3.   How hard is it to get back to the original innocent heart once walls have been put up to protect it from dealing with the pain?

4.   How did it make you feel to watch the students on SRL talk about being bullied?

 

Books to Display

Fiction

Cerra, Kerry O'Malley.  Just a drop of water.  New York : Sky Pony Press, [2014].

Craft, Jerry with Jaylen Craft and Aren Craft. The offenders : saving the world while serving detention!  Norwalk [Conn.] : Mama's Boyz, Inc, [2014].

Folan, Karyn Langhorne. Pretty Ugly (Bluford Series). West Berlin, NJ : Townsend Press, [2011].
Klass, David. Stuck on Earth. New York : Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 2010.

Lennon, M. T.  Confessions of a so-called middle child.  New York, NY : Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, [2013].

Medina, Meg. Yaqui Delgado wants to kick your ass. Somerville, Mass. : Candlewick Press, 2014.

Miller, Ashley Edward and Zack Stentz. Colin Fischer. New York : Razorbill, 2012.

Nielsen, Susin. We are all made of molecules  New York : Wendy Lamb Books, [2015].

Patterson, James and Chris Grabenstein.  I funny.  New York : Little, Brown and Co., 2012.

Rylander, Chris. The fourth stall. New York : Walden Pond Press, [2011].

Stevens, Eric [Jake Maddox]. Board battle.  North Mankato, Minn. : Capstone Stone Arch Books, [2014].

Stevens, Eric [Jake Maddox]. Paintball problems. North Mankato, Minn. : Capstone Stone Arch Books, [2014].

 

Non-fiction

Criswell, Patti Kelley. Stand up for yourself & your friends : dealing with bullies and bossiness, and finding a better way.  Middleton, WI : American Girl Pub., [2009].

Landau, Jennifer.  Dealing with bullies, cliques, and social stress (Series: Middle school survival handbook).  New York : Rosen Central, 2013.

Nelson, Drew.  Dealing with cyberbullies (Series: Cyberspace survival guide).  New York : Gareth Stevens Pub., 2013.

Shapiro, Ouisie. Bullying and me : schoolyard stories. Chicago : Albert Whitman, c2010.

Winkler, Kathleen. Are you being bullied? (Series: Got issues?). Berkeley Heights, NJ : Enslow Publishers, Inc., [2015].

 

Actvitity Supply List

A computer or device capable of showing short video clips.

Blank paper - or Bullied Heart worksheet.

Writing utensil(s).

 

Incentives

A final product.

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Bullying: The Heart Exercise for Individuals Lesson Plan. http://scetv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/90d235c3-a7da-4121-8c96-168938e3e77d/the-heart-exercise-for-individuals-lesson-plan/

 

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Resources

Academic Programs

Academic Program

Flyer

Comic Rubric

Active Programs

Active Program

Flyer

Annotated Bibliography

Book Quiz

Passive Program

Passive Program

Build Yourself

Bullied Heart Instructions

Poster

Touchdown

Read-A-Likes

 


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Created on Mar 7, 2017 | Last updated April 17, 2017