Author Feature-Diana Noble

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

Middle School

Featured Author

Diana Noble

 

 


 

Find her on the web:

Blog


 

 


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster.

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon youtube icon



Book Trailer


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster.

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon YouTube icon



Book Quiz

Printable Copy

 

Chapter 1 & 2

1. Where is Evangelina when she overhears Papá and Emilio?

2. What is Evangelina worried about as she returns to the house?

3. What special event is Elsa preparing for?

4. What is Elsa’s favorite dessert?

5. Did Evangelina disobey her mother’s request of keeping a secret?

6. How did Mamá and Papá learn to read?

7. Who tells the children tales about a boy named Gorgonio?

8. What book does Mamá reading to Thomas?

9. Where was Evangelina born?

 

Chapters 3 & 4

1. Name three chores that Evangelina does each day.

2. Why do you think Evangelina likes her life on the farm so much?

3. How many brother and sisters does Evangelina have?

4. Who wants to run the ranch when Papá is too old?

5. What goes together like coffee and cream?

6. What happens if the one of the crops doesn’t do well on the farm?

7. Why is Evangeline worried about the Revolution?

8. What once attacked Tomás in the middle of the night?

9. What flavor of empanada did they make?

10. What happened to Tomás?

 

Chapter 5 & 6

1. What does La Llorona mean in English?

2. Why does Elsa want to cancel the quinceañera?

3. Who is Evangelina worried about?

4. What food does Mamá make with the help of the whole family?

 

Chapter 7 & 8

1. The first sentence in chapter 7 is an example of what type of figurative language? (“Despite all the worries and extra work, the excitement in the house today is thick as refried beans.”)

2. Why does Elsa feel bad for celebrating her quinceañera?

3. What happened to Señora Treviño’s son and husband?

4. Who does Elsa dance with?

5. Who shows up at the quinceañera as a surprise?

6. What does Pedro warn the families about?

7. Can you predict what will happen next in this story?

8. What does Papá feel is the safest plan for the family?

9. What does Papá say the soldiers want from their town?

 

Chapter 9 & 10

1. Where does Evangelina hide the box her grandfather gave her?

2. Who is staying at the farm & why?

3. Who is not riding the train?

4. Where does Abuelito take Evangelina?

5. Who starts to follow the wagon, but turns around and and returns to the house?

6. Where is the family headed?

7. What does the barren landscape symbolize as they travel north?

 

Chapter 11 & 12

1. What does Evangelina lose before she boards the train?

2. Who does Evangelina meet on the train?

3. What food do they share?

4. What type of figurative language does the following sentence from page 78 demonstrate: “I close my eyes and try to taste it with my mind.”

5. According to Abuelo, what is fate and where does it come from?

6. What does Evangelina’s dream symbolize?

7. What was Margarita’s job on the farm she lived on?

8. What happened to Margarita’s family on the farm?

9. Why do you feel the author included Margarita and her story?

10. Why is Evangelina worried about them checking her suitcase.

11. Where is the family headed when they get off the train?

12. What river does the train cross as they leave Mexico?

13. What offensive sign does the family encounter at a grocery store in Seneca?

 

Chapter 13 & 14

1. Who helps the family in Seneca find their way to Tía Cristina’s house?

2. Where does Enrique sleep at his aunt’s house?

3. After Evangelina’s family moves in, how many people are living in the tiny house?

4. Where did Emilio get a job?

5. How much will he make at his new job?

6. Why doesn’t Evangelina want to grow up?

 

Chapter 15 & 16

1. What are Evangelina’s feelings about her new home, as described in paragraph 1. What two details help you understand her feelings?

2. What does Evangelina wish for her birthday?

3. Why is Evangelina worried about going to school?

4. Why did Mamá send Evangelina to get the doctor?

5. What do you think the chapter 16 title, “What You Make of It,” refers to?

 

Chapter 17 & 18

1. What does Mamá ask Evangelina to do before they enter the church?

2. Why is Mamá refused service at the funeral home?

3. Name three things Evangelina is worried about?

4. Which character begins to recover from depression caused by the loss of her baby?

5. Why does the doctor apologize?

6. How did the doctor communicate with Evangelina?

7. What does the doctor ask of Evangelina?

8. Who has to walk Evangelina to work?  

 

Chapter 19 & 20

1. What is Evangelina’s dress made out of?

2. Why she was happy her hair braids covered her ears?

3. Why do many of the boys and girls at school not like Alfonso?

4. Where is Evangelina expected to use the bathroom?

5. Why did Alfonso get whipped on his first day of school?

6. How did Rosemary make Alfonso cry?

7. Why was Papá proud of Evangelina?

8. What did Abuelito steal from the Comanches?

9. What did the Comanches believe the cross could do?

10. What did Abuelito imagine he would do with the money from the cross?

11. Why did he regret stealing it?

 

Chapter 21 & 22

1. Why do the other students make fun of Evangelina’s lunch bag?

2. Where is Selim from?

3. Why does Selim take Evangelina outside?

4. Where does Evangelina say “home” is?

5. Who did Mamá call “stupid?”

6. What does Evangelina think is a disadvantage to learning English?

7. What is the Town Hall Meeting about?

8. Who does Selim say is jealous of Evangelina?

Chapter 23 & 24

1. What is Evangelina doing at the Doc’s office?

2. What happened to Doc’s wife?

3. What did Doctor Taylor find that could influence the outcome of the Town Meeting?

4. How will this item help Evangelina?

5. Does Papá agree to attend the Town Hall meeting?

6. At the town meeting, what did Frank say happened to his father?

7. What message did Evangelina send at the town meeting?

 

Chapter 25 & 26

1. How did Evangelina feel after the town meeting?

2. Who did Tía Cristina call a hero?

3. Where is Papá going?

4. Who names her Princess Evangelina?

5. Good food does what, according to Abuelito?

6. What did Papá do with cross?

7. What does Evangelina think about her farm life now?

8. _____ are chances in disguise.

9. Abuelito compares Evangelina to what in his letter?

10. Explain how Evangelina has changed by the end of the book?

 


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster.

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon youtube icon



Academic Program 

Printable Copy 

Timeline

Venn Diagram


General Introduction to Academic Program

 

In Diana J. Noble’s novel Evangelina Takes Flight, readers get a glimpse into life in Mexico during the Mexican Revolution and the experience of traveling to a foreign country. The following activities will provide students with further insight into Evangelina’s character and give them the opportunity to learn more about the time period and setting in which she lived. 

 

Activity 1 Title: Timeline & Venn diagram 

Activity 1 Introduction

Students will understand and identify key events that took place in Mexico during the summer of 1911 until 1912; students will compare/contrast key events from American Revolution vs. Mexican Revolution.  Students will work in pairs to make a timeline with their information and a Venn diagram.

 

Activity 1 TEKS

Reading ELA

 6, 7, & 8th grades

(12) (A) (B) 

Social Studies

Grade 6 & 7

(21)  (C)  (D) 

(29) (B) 

 

Activity 1 Detailed Description

Step 1 – Print a copy of the blank timeline and Venn diagram templates for each student and distribute them. Students may work individually or in pairs.

 Step 2 – Students can use online and print resources to research key events of the Mexican and American Revolutions.  

 Step 3 – Ask students to outline key events of the Mexican Revolution and American Revolution on the time lines.

 Step 4 – Students will then transfer that information to the Venn diagram to compare and contrast the two revolutions.

 Step 4 - Students may illustrate their timelines & Venn diagram.

 

Activity 1 Books to Display

Villa and Zapata: A History of the Mexican Revolution (Paperback) by Frank McLynn

 Mexico: Biography of Power Paperback by Enrique Krauze

 The Mexican Revolution a Short History, 1910-1920 by Stuart Easterling

 Mexican Migration to the United States: Perspectives from Both Sides of the Border by Harriett Romo

 

 Activity 1 Supply List

Computers or devices for research

Timeline template

Venn diagram template

Paper

Color Pencils

Pens

Pencils

 

Activity 1 Activity Resources

Timeline template

Venn diagram template

 

Activity 1 Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Schmoop. “The American Revolution Timeline.” https://www.shmoop.com/american-revolution/timeline.html

History.com. “American Revolution History.” http://www.history.com/topics/american-revolution/american-revolution-history

Hispanic Reading Room. “Distant Neighbors: The U.S. and the Mexican Revolution - Basic Timeline for the Mexican Revolution.” https://www.loc.gov/rr/hispanic/mexico/timeline.html

National Endowment for the Humanities: EDSITEment. “The Mexican Revolution: November 20th, 1910.” https://edsitement.neh.gov/feature/mexican-revolution-november-20th-1910

Squarehead Teachrers. “Blank Timeline Printables.” www.squareheadteachers.com/2013/08/14/blank-timeline-printables/

The Mexican Revolution a Short History, 1910-1920 by Stuart Easterling

Villa and Zapata: A History of the Mexican Revolution (Paperback) by Frank McLynn

American Revolution by Stuart Murray

 


 

 

Activity 2 Title: Travel Brochure

Activity 2 Introduction

Students will create/design a travel brochure for entering another country in the 1910 - 1940. Students will research travel options during this time period. Evangelina traveled by train into America.  She describes the scenes in the book as crowded and long. Students will research possible travel options during this time period, and reasons why people traveled. 

 

Activity 2 TEKS

ELA TEKS 6, 7, 8 Grades:

(11)  (A) (B)

(12) (A) (B) 

(13) (A) (B) (C) (D)

Social Studies

Grade 6 & 7

(21) (C)  (D)

Grade 8

29)  (B) 

 

Activity 2 Detailed Description

Step 1 - Students look at travel brochures for examples of ideas. Learn about what makes a successful travel brochure. Collect travel brochures from travel agents, the local chamber of commerce, or a near-by convention and visitor's bureau. Or, together, you can look online at some travel examples:

Notes From the Road: This site offers photos, maps, and narratives on places all over North and Central America. www.notesfromtheroad.com

U.S., Canada, and Mexico Destinations: National Geographic city guides, which contain in-depth information, city and park highlights, and more, are available from this page. www.nationalgeographicexpeditions.com/destinations/northamerica

Train Schedules if they will be travelling by train.

Step 2 - Students will fold an 8 ½ x 11 inch paper into three parts or create three columns on a computer document, and outline the main topics to include on the travel brochure.

Step 3 - Students will look at examples of marketing techniques to create interest in their selected travel destination and decide on a theme of their brochure.

Step 4 - Students will use photographs, graphics, or original artwork to design their own travel brochure.

Step 5 - Students will put their brochure together and print it out, or add color if drawing their own.

 

Activity 2 Books to Display 

Villa and Zapata: A History of the Mexican Revolution by Frank McLynn

The Mexican Revolution a Short History, 1910-1920 by Stuart Easterling

Mexican Migration to the United States: Perspectives from Both Sides of the Border by Harriett Romo

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Mexico

 

Activity 2 Supply List

Computers or devices for research

Paper

Printer

Pencils

Pens

Color pencils

Travel Brochures

Stickers or stamps and stamp pads

 

Activity 2 Incentives

Suggestion: Sticker/stamps rewards for completed steps, since this activity will take time. Weekly deadlines for each section will help this activity move smoothly.

 

Activity 2 Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Read Write Think: Design a Travel Brochure: http://www.readwritethink.org/parent-afterschool-resources/activities-projects/design-travel-brochure-30297.html?main-tab=2#tabs

Notes From the Road: This site offers photos, maps, and narratives on places all over North and Central America. www.notesfromtheroad.com

U.S., Canada, and Mexico Destinations: National Geographic city guides, which contain in-depth information, city and park highlights, and more, are available from this page. www.nationalgeographicexpeditions.com/destinations/northamerica

Books

Villa and Zapata: A History of the Mexican Revolution by Frank McLynn

The Mexican Revolution a Short History, 1910-1920 by Stuart Easterling

Mexican Migration to the United States: Perspectives from Both Sides of the Border by Harriett Romo

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Mexico

 


 

 Activity 3 Title: Trait Tracing

 

Activity 3 Introduction

Identifying specific personality traits can be a good springboard for analysis of Evangelina’s character traits.  Several events in the story highlight Evangelina's traits.

 

Activity 3 TEKS

8.(6)  (A)  (B) 

8.(19)  (A)  (i)  (ii)  (iii) 

 

Activity 3 Detailed Description of Activity 

Step 1 - Gather information about Evangelina’s primary traits by creating a character map that combines personality elements with textual evidence.

Step 2 - Draw a circle in the center of a piece of paper and write Evangelina in the center. Then, branch off with other circles from the center that mention adjectives that describe her.

Variation: Draw a life size version of Evangelina on butcher paper - add quotes/character traits as you read with sticky notes.

Step 3 - For each adjective, write a direct quotation from the book or your story that illustrates why this word applies to the Evangelina, or write on the page: “I know that Evangelina is _______________ because____________________ on page _____________.”

 

Activity 3 Books to Display

Evangelina Takes Flight by Diana J. Noble

 

Activity 3 Supplies

Large paper or butcher paper

Pencils

Pens

Sticky notes

Copies of Evangelina Takes Flight by Diana J. Noble

 

 Activity 3 Incentives

Grades/rubrics

 

Activity 3 Resources for Teens, Teacher & Librarians

Cliffs Notes: Aeneid Character Map. www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/a/aeneid/character-map

 

 

Works Cited

“Design a Travel Brochure - ReadWriteThink.” Readwritethink.org, www.readwritethink.org/parent-afterschool-resources/activities-projects/design-travel-brochure-30297.html.

“The American Revolution Timeline.” Schmoop. https://www.shmoop.com/american-revolution/timeline.html

“American Revolution History.” History.com. http://www.history.com/topics/american-revolution/american-revolution-history

“Distant Neighbors: The U.S. and the Mexican Revolution - Basic Timeline for the Mexican Revolution.” Hispanic Reading Room. https://www.loc.gov/rr/hispanic/mexico/timeline.html

“The Mexican Revolution: November 20th, 1910.” National Endowment for the Humanities: EDSITEment. https://edsitement.neh.gov/feature/mexican-revolution-november-20th-1910

Squarehead Teachers. “Blank Timeline Printables.” www.squareheadteachers.com/2013/08/14/blank-timeline-printables/

McLynn, Frank. Villa and Zapata: a History of the Mexican Revolution. Basic Books, 2008.

Krauze, Enrique, and Hank Heifetz. Mexico: Biography of Power: a History of Modern Mexico, 1810-1996. Harper Perennial, 1998.

Easterling, Stuart. The Mexican Revolution a Short History, 1910-1920. Haymarket Books, 2012.

Romo, Harriett D. Mexican Migration to the United States: Perspectives from Both Sides of the Border. University of Texas Press, 2016.

DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Mexico. DK Eyewitness Travel, 2014.

Murray, Stuart. American Revolution. DK Children, 2015.

 

 

If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster.

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon youtube icon



Active Programs

Printable Copy

Interview Questions

Reception Invitation

Handouts

 

General Introduction to Active Program

Diana J. Noble loosely based her novel Evangelina Takes Flight on her grandmother’s life and the stories of other family members. If her family had not shared those stories, Noble’s beautiful book could not have been written. This program will give teens a chance to learn about their own family’s history and share it with others.

 

Activity 1 Title

Their Story & Me: Interviews & Poster

 

Activity 1 Introduction

 For this intergenerational program, teens will interview a grandparent or other relative to learn about their personal family history. They will create a poster display which will be presented at a reception for participants and their families.

 

Detailed Description of Activity 1

Provide teens with the program instructions, the list of interview questions, the poster handouts, and a reception invitation. The library can provide a poster board or ask patrons to provide their own. The provided list of questions are suggestions. You can find additional questions at http://oralhistory.library.ucla.edu/familyHistory.html and http://www.sjsu.edu/people/magdalena.barrera/courses/mas115/Family%20History%20Assignment.

 

The handouts use the pronoun “they” to make it more generic, but you can change it to “he” and “she” if preferred. Specific questions on the handouts can be changed, or deleted entirely to allow teens to further personalize their poster.

 

Teens will select a grandparent or other relative to interview. They can use the questions provided, or make up their own. Interviews can be held in person, by phone, or by video chat. Teens should take notes in a notebook or on separate paper. After the interview, they will use their notes to fill out the provided handouts. Then they will glue or tape the handouts to a poster board (see example below). They can decorate the poster board as much as they’d like, and then bring it back to the library for the reception.

 

Alternatively, the interview and poster creation can also take place as an activity in the library. If you go this route, teens and their selected interviewee will attend together. They should bring photographs of their interview subject with them. Pass out the list of interview questions. Teens will spend 45 minutes to an hour interviewing. Then, provide supplies for teens and their interviewee supplies to assemble and decorate their poster (handouts, poster boards, glue or tape, pencils, pens, markers, construction paper, glitter, etc.). The reception can take place immediately following, or can be scheduled on another date. If you choose the former, be sure to pass out reception invitations for participants to give to their family and friends.

 

Activity 1 Books to Display or Book Talk

Doing Oral History by Donald A. Richie

Tracing Your Ancestors through Family Photographs by Jayne Shrimpton

 

 

Activity Supply List

Poster boards (optional)

Tape or glue

Pencils

Pens

Markers

Construction paper, glitter, tissue paper, washi tape, or other decorating materials (optional)

 

 

Activity Resources 

Interview Questions

Poster handouts

Reception invitations

 

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

 

UCLA Library's Center for Oral History Research: Family History Sample Outline and Questions http://oralhistory.library.ucla.edu/familyHistory.html

Family History Assignment by Magdalena L. Barrera http://www.sjsu.edu/people/magdalena.barrera/courses/mas115/Family%20History%20Assignment

 

 


 

Activity 2 Title

Their Story & Me Reception

 

Activity 2 Introduction

The reception is a chance for teens to share their poster display and what they’ve learned about their family history with friends, family, and others.

 

 

Activity 2 Detailed Description of Activity

The reception can be limited to only participating teens and their family and friends, or the general public also can be invited. Make sure that participants have received copies of the reception invitation when they received their poster supplies.

 

Teens will bring their completed posters to the library for a reception. The boards will be displayed around the room. Teens will take turns presenting their poster and summarizing what they learned about their family. If the person they interviewed is present, they can introduce them. Then, everyone can take time to view the other boards and talk about their experiences. If your budget allows, light refreshments can be served.

 

If time permits, choose one or two from the list below to book talk.  Each listed title was based on or inspired by true stories. If you have a projector, screen, and computer available, you can play book trailers instead. Links to book trailers for most of the titles are included in the resources below.

 

 

Activity 2 Books to Display

Evangelina Takes Flight by Diana J. Noble

Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys

Enrique's Journey (The Young Adult Adaptation) by Sonia Nazario

Lucky Broken Girl by Ruth Behar

It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas

 

Activity 2 Supply List

Tables/Easels for displaying posters OR tape for hanging posters on walls

Refreshments (optional)

Water (optional)

Napkins (optional)

Plates (optional)

Computer, projector, screen (for book trailers)

 

Activity 2 Activity Resources

Reception invitation

 

Activity 2 Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Salt to the Sea Book Trailer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rswhDmkPseA

Enrique's Journey Book Trailer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5E27ajVifE

Lucky Broken Girl Book Trailer by Ruth Behar. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etCLlFl1jnw

 

 

 

If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster.

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon youtube icon



Passive Programs 

Printable Copy

Sign

Questionnaire

General Introduction to Passive Program

In Diana J. Noble’s timely novel, the title character Evangelina undergoes a physical and emotional journey beginning at her sister’s quinceañera in a small Mexican town and continuing on through her family’s move to Texas. The following activities encourage teens to explore their own family traditions and encourages them to view others without prejudice.

 

Activity 1 Title

Where I’m From

 

Activity 1 Introduction

Evangelina’s family is greeted with distrust and anger when her family immigrates to Texas from Mexico. Although this book takes place over a century ago, many still view immigrants with suspicion. In this activity, teens will create a collaborative infographic that shows where they and their families are from.

 

Activity 1 Books to Display

It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas

Wishtree by Katherine Applegate

Refugee by Alan Gratz

Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan

 

Activity 1 Supply List

Sticky notes (3 colors)

Poster board

Black Marker

Pencils or pens

Table

 

Activity 1 Detailed Description of Activity

On the poster board, draw a rectangle about 8 inches wide in the center and write Texas inside it. Draw a larger rectangle around that, leaving about a 4 inch gap and write United States. Write Earth in the remaining blank rectangle. Hang the poster somewhere that students can reach it.

Print and display “Libraries Are for Everyone” images by Habufoti around the poster to draw attention to it. You can find images on Habufoti’s page at https://hafuboti.com/2017/02/02/libraries-are-for-everyone/ and https://hafuboti.com/2017/02/06/libraries-are-for-everyone-an-epic-correction/.

Leave out sticky notes in three colors and pens or pencils on a table for teens to use. On the first color, they will write where they are from. On the second color, they will write where their parents are from. On the third color sticky note, they will write where their grandparents are from. Then, they will put the sticky notes on the poster board in the corresponding square.

 

Activity 1 Activity Resources 

Instruction sign for teens

“Libraries are for Everyone Graphics” images https://hafuboti.com/2017/02/02/libraries-are-for-everyone/

“Libraries Are for Everyone: An Epic Correction” images https://hafuboti.com/2017/02/06/libraries-are-for-everyone-an-epic-correction/

 

 


 

Activity 2 Title 

Traditions Passed Through Time

  

Activity 2 Introduction

Many traditions are discussed in this novel, as Evangelina learns to let go of her comfortable traditions and move into making new ones. What family traditions have passed through generations in your family? 

 

Activity 2 Detailed Description

Set up a table with a book display (titles listed below), blank paper, and copies of the family tradition questionnaire. Teens can take the questionnaire and a piece of paper home to decorate.

At home, they will discuss family traditions with their parents and grandparents and design a flyer advertising those traditions. Then, they will bring the decorated paper back to display on a bulletin board at the library.

 

Activity 2 Books to Display

Wishtree by Katherine Applegate

Refugee by Alan Gratz

Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan

 

Activity 2 Supply List

Paper

Bulletin Board

Table

 

Activity 2 Activity Resources

Family Tradition Questionnaire

 

 

If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster

Follow Us:

facebook icon twitter icon youtube icon
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version Share this
Created on Mar 26, 2018 | Last updated March 28, 2018