Author Feature-Francisco X. Stork

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

High School

Featured Author

Francisco X. Stork

 

 

 

Find him on the web:

 Website

 

 


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Book Trailer

Used with permission from Scholastic

 


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Book Discussion Questions 

Printable Copy

In chapter one, Sara’s bosses tell her that there is more to life than evil and pain and that she should write happier newspaper articles. Did you understand their fear for her? What would you do if an authority figure told you not to discuss or write about something that bothered you? What would you do if you were in her boss’s shoes?

 

What were your impressions of the men who try to get Emiliano involved in their “business?” Did you think they were really impressed with his keen business sense, or did you suspect that they wanted to take advantage of his youth and desire to impress Perla Rubi’s family? Discuss.

 

The author could have easily told only Sara or only Emiliano’s story instead of both of them together. Why do you think that the author chose to combine the story of Sara looking for her lost friend and Emiliano being tempted into a dangerous world of drug trafficking?

 

The dangerous men in Emiliano’s life tell him that he can’t get ahead and be successful unless he does things he doesn’t like. Do you think there is any truth to this statement? Why or why not?

 

Sara has forgiven her father for not coming back to them and asking her mother for a divorce. Emiliano has not, refusing to contact his father or read most of the letters he has sent. What do you think accounts for the difference in their reactions?

 

Sara has a strong moral compass and very distinct beliefs about what is wrong and what is right. She is not swayed from her mission to find her friend and other missing girls, even when her life and the life of her family is threatened. Emiliano struggles with keeping to an honest path. What accounts for this difference in the two as they face challenges to their morals? Why is Emiliano more easily swayed?

 

The physical environment of Juarez and the desert are themes that keep reappearing throughout this book, particularly the nighttime sky and stars. What do the nighttime stars symbolize in the lives of both Sara and Emiliano during their journey?

 

Emiliano has lost his faith, while Sara and her mother turn to prayer and belief in the face of overwhelming difficulties. Why do you think Emiliano has lost his faith? Why has Sara kept hers even when those she trusts let her down?

 

After encountering betrayal by those she has known for years, Sara finds she must go by her intuition in choosing who to trust with her life and safety. Have you ever had to use your intuition to make an important decision? How did it work out?

 

Emiliano tells Sara that the U.S. is a place where they will be unwanted and “hated by many.” What do you foresee for Sara and Emiliano’s future in the U.S.? Will they be able to overcome attitudes of hostility towards immigrants? What skills and character traits do they possess that might help them succeed?


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Academic Programs 

Printable Copy

 

Academic Programs

 

Activity 1: Ethical Dilemmas for Teens - What would you do?

 

Introduction

Ethical Dilemmas for Teens - What would you do? is a Social Emotional Learning (SEL) cross-curricular lesson in which students consider real world situations that may require difficult ethical choices, just as Sara Zapata and her brother Emiliano faced their own difficult ethical decisions in Disappeared. This lesson may help students consider the impact and outcome of actions like cheating, lying, not speaking up, engaging in criminal or unsavory activity, harassment, bullying, etc.

 

TEKS

English I, II, III, IV  - 24a, 25, 26

Health 1 - 9a, 14e, 14g; 15a, 15b, 17b, 17c

Advanced Health - 13a

 

Books to Display

Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Green

Hidden by Miriam Halahmy

Scythe by Neal Shusterman

Flygirl by Sherri L. Smith

Disappeared by Francisco X. Stork

All the Rage by Courtney Summers

Some Girls Are by Courtney Summers

 

Supply List

Index cards

Sticky Note Easel paper

BrainPop Ethics Activity Graphic Organizer

Markers

Small sticky notes

Pens or pencils

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Groups of 2-4 students will choose an imaginary moral dilemma, discuss various options and come to a conclusion as to what decision to make. They will present their problem, their solution, and how they came to it to the entire class. If time permits, there will be class comments and discussion on each group’s presentation.

 

1.Teacher/Librarian will prepare index cards with various moral dilemmas requiring a decision. Teacher will pass out one card to each group. The Ethical Dilemmas for Classroom Discussion - THE DAILY DILEMMA ARCHIVE web page contains 31 teen moral dilemmas, but facilitators may supply their own.

2. Students in each group will read and discuss the moral dilemma they have been given.

Group will use the BrainPop Ethics Activity Graphic Organizer to come to a group decision about their moral dilemma.

3. Group will use a large sticky note easel sheet and markers to draw a representation of their dilemma and their decision process.

4. Each group will present their sheet and explain  problem, solution and decision making process to the class in a brief 2-4 minute presentation. Other students will be allowed to ask questions of each group. Easel will be left at the front of the class, on the wall.

OPTIONAL (depending on time):

1.Students will be given individual small sticky notes to write brief comments about other’s group’s easel sheets. The class will be given 5 minutes to walk around and put their comments on other sheets.

2. Teacher will facilitate class discussion about reactions to presentations

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

BrainPop Ethics Activity Graphic Organizer - https://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/ethics/activity/#=graphicOrganizer

 

Ethical Dilemmas for Classroom Discussion - The Daily Dilemma Archive -
http://www.goodcharacter.com/dilemma/archive.html

 


 

Activity 2: Tales of the Brave/Stories of Survival: Your Voice Thread

 

Introduction

In Disappeared, Sara Zapata has to summon bravery she didn’t know she has to write her story. Her brother Emiliano has to summon all of his survival skills in order to endure a desert journey. In this program, students will combine writing and audio/visual techniques to portray someone whose bravery or survival story they consider inspiring. VoiceThread provides students with an opportunity to tell a story in a way that creates unique results for each student. Students who may be intimidated by writing are naturally drawn into telling their stories through visuals.

 

TEKS

English I, II, III, IV 13a, b, c, d; 14c, 15d

Visual Media Analysis and Production 3a, b

Digital Video and Audio Design 9d, g

 

Books to Display

The Boy Who Dared by Susan Campbell Bartoletti

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

The Living by Matt de la Pena

Refugee by Alan Gratz

Beautiful Hero: How We Survived the Khmer Rouge by Jennifer Lau

Every Falling Star: The true story of how I survived and escaped North Korea  by Sungju Lee

Illegal by Bettina Restropo

Wild Bird by Wendelin Van Draanen

 

Supply List

Computer (PC, laptop, Chromebook) OR Tablet device (iPad, Android)

Microsoft Word or Google Docs

Internet access

VoiceThread account (free)

Computer microphone

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Introduction: Teacher will show sample VoiceThreads (available by browsing free VoiceThread program) to introduce program to students.

Choose story - Students will decide on their VoiceThread story - either a profile of a brave person they know or have known personally OR a story of survival, either personal or of a person they know.

Choose visuals - Students will choose 10-20 visuals, either originals or ones they have found on the web, that they find representative of the story they want to tell

Write script - Students will write a draft and final script to accompany their visuals. Script should be timed with photos to produce a VoiceThread of two to four minutes

Adding VoiceThread account: Student will register for account in VoiceThread.com

Add visual photos in VoiceThread- Students will add in their visuals in desired order for their VoiceThread

Recording audio from script for each photo - Students will use computer mic to record audio for each VoiceThread visuals.

Share VoiceThread - Students will share their VoiceThread with other students in the class

Comment on other Voice Threads - Students will leave comments on all of their classmates’ VoiceThreads.

 

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

VoiceThread http://www.voicethread.com

 


 

Activity 3: The Most Dangerous Job in the World: Mexican Journalists

 

Introduction

The novel Disappeared touches on the life-threatening danger facing Mexican journalists who report on issues such as “The Disappeared”(over 36,000 Mexican citizens who have disappeared and are presumed murdered), violent drug cartels, and corrupt police and government officials. This English Language Arts lesson uses current news articles and strategies such as KWL charts, Cornell Notes, group discussion, reflection and journal writing to increase student’s comprehension of a complex topic. This lesson includes mature subject matter and supplemental materials that may be most suitable for grades 11 and 12.

 

TEKS

English Language Arts and Reading, English I, II, II IV: 1b, 6, 9a, 10a, 12c, 13b

 

Books to Display

10 Days in a Madhouse by Nellie Bly

Fake ID by Lamar Giles

Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera

Paper Daughter by Jeanette Ingold

The Story of Vicente, Who Murdered His Mother, His Father, and His Sister: Life and Death in Juárez by Sandra Nieto

Disappeared by Francisco X. Stork

Down the Rabbit Hole: A Novel by Juan Pablo Villalobos

 

Supply List

Disappeared Handout #1:”Journalists Are Fleeing For Their Lives In Mexico”

Disappeared Handout #2: Cornell Note Taking System (PDF)

Disappeared Handout #3: Cornell Notes Template

Disappeared Handout #4: KWL Chart

OPTIONAL: LCD projector or document camera to display example of Cornell Notes, KWL chart, and LA Times article.

For journal entries/reaction papers, use what is familiar to students - existing composition books, online student blogs, Google Classroom or electronic submissions, or typed printed out papers.

 

Detailed Description of Activity

1.For classes not familiar with Cornell Note Taking System, teacher will review Handout #2, “Cornell Note Taking System” with students, and demonstrate how it is used

2.Teacher will distribute Handout #1, “Journalists Are Fleeing For Their Lives In Mexico”, along with Handout #2, “Cornell Note Taking System” (PDF) and Handout #3: “Cornell Notes Template.”

3.Teacher will read article  “Journalists Are Fleeing For Their Lives In Mexico” out loud to students (Optional: display article on L.A. times website and while reading article. There is also a video on the website that can be viewed prior or subsequent to reading article).

4. Students will take Cornell Notes while teacher reads article.

5. Students will split into small groups of 2-4 students, depending on size of class.

6. Teacher will distribute Handout #4 “KWL Chart” to each group.A KWL chart, as explained on the website http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/printouts/chart-a-30226.html, tracks what a student knows (K), wants to know (W), and has learned (L) about a topic.

7. Students will discuss article and fill out group KWL chart indicating what they each knew about the topic before reading article, what they wanted to know about the topic when they started reading, and what they have learned about the topic from reading article.

8. Classroom discussion. Teacher will write a classroom KWL chart on electronic or marker board as each group reports the results of their KWL.

9. Students then will write individual 300-500 word journal entries or reaction papers, either electronically on existing student blogs, in existing composition book journals, or submitted as a separate paper, either electronically (via Google Classroom or similar shared classroom delivery system) or typed and printed out, giving their reaction to the L.A. Times article. Reactions should include, but are not limited to the following:

a. What was most surprising to you about this article?

b. Do you think Mexican journalists seeking political asylum in the U.S. should receive it? Why or why not?

c. Would you be willing to risk your life for your job as these Mexican journalists did?

10. OPTIONAL: teacher may also supply URLs to students for one or both of the optional articles, "Number Of Journalists Killed In Mexico Reaches 'Historical High,' Report Says" and  "The most Dangerous Places for Journalists," which may be helpful for their journal entries.

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Blank Cornell Notes Template https://www.cusd80.com/cms/lib/AZ01001175/Centricity/Domain/8229/note%20template.docx

 

The Cornell Note-taking System http://lsc.cornell.edu/notes.html

 

Number Of Journalists Killed In Mexico Reaches 'Historical High,' Report Says https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2017/12/22/572822696/number-of-journalists-killed-in-mexico-reaches-historical-high-report-says

 

K-W-L Chart http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/printouts/chart-a-30226.html

 

Journalists are Fleeing for Their Lives in Mexico. There are Few Havens. http://www.latimes.com/world/la-fg-mexico-journalists-20180205-story.html

NOTE: This website allows limited viewings without a subscription. Downloaded copyrighted handout in lesson materials.

 

The Most Dangerous Places for Journalists https://discoverer.prod.sirs.com/discoweb/disco/do/article?urn=urn%3Asirs%3AUS%3BARTICLE%3BART%3B0000401624

 

 

 

 

 


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Active Programs


Printable Copy

Survival Raffle

Texas Puzzle

Tips

Wilderness

 

Active Programs

 

Disappeared by Francisco X. Stork is a timely look at border politics between the U.S. and Mexico. These programs are designed to help teens learn and think critically about the issues raised in the novel. The programs encourage teens to consider citizenship in the United States and how it relates to them personally, as well as the hardships that people endure to come to this country in search of a brighter future.

 

Activity 1: We Are Texas

 

Introduction

Teens will create a collaborative public art piece showcasing their own individuality and diversity, which in turn reflects that of their community. Teens will personalize individual puzzle pieces which make up an image of Texas. The puzzle motif reinforces the idea that our state is made up of very different populations, cultures, and experiences to create a unified whole.The finished piece will serve as a visual reminder of diversity in your library’s community.

 

Books to Display

Love, Hate, and Other Filters by Samira Ahmed

American Panda by Gloria Chao

Something in Between by Melissa de la Cruz

The Good Braider by Terry Farish

Girl Mans Up by M-E Girard

Refugee by Alan Gratz

The Radius of Us by Marie Marquardt

When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

The Authentics by Abdi Nazemian

Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older

Rani Patel in Full Effect by Sonia Patel

You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins

Illegal by Bettina Restropo

I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Ericka L. Sánchez

American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang

The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

American Street by Ibi Zoboi

 

Supply List

Display space such as bulletin board or wall

Butcher paper and/or poster board

Scissors

Art supplies – markers, crayons, colored pencils, stickers, etc.

Double sided tape

Optional: projector

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Begin by selecting a location within the library for the finished artwork to be displayed. This will help you determine the parameters for the artwork. Hang a background surface, such as butcher paper or poster board, in the display area. Depending on the size of your display space, you may choose to use the provided template, or use some other means to create a shape in the outline of Texas on your background surface. One option is to use a projector to trace the provided template onto the background surface. You may also free-draw it yourself, or have a talented volunteer try their hand at it. Once you have the outline of Texas, divide the interior of the shape into puzzle pieces. You may choose to cut the pieces apart to distribute to teens, or leave them as a whole and let teens work collaboratively up close to the map on the day of the program.

 

On the day of the program, provide a variety of art supplies and encourage teens to decorate their own puzzle piece in a way that represents their personality or some aspect of their being. If the pieces have been cut apart, let teens work together to reassemble them onto the map. Attach using double-sided tape. Ask artistically-minded teens to create a banner to display with the map that reads “We Are Texas.” Display books about the immigrant experience nearby.

 

Activity Resources

Texas Map

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

5 Ways Arts Projects Can Improve Struggling Communities https://www.pps.org/article/artsprojects

The Human Face of Immigration https://www.tolerance.org/magazine/spring-2011/the-human-face-of-immigration

 


 

Activity 2: Wilderness Survival Science Day

 

Introduction

When Emiliano Zapata begins his harsh journey through South Texas to find safety in the United States, he is confident in his survival skills due to his previous wilderness training with the Jiparis. Invite teens to the library for an afternoon of building wilderness survival skills through cool science activities.

 

Books to Display

Backpacker Outdoor Survival: Skills to Survive and Stay Alive by Molly Absolon

The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks

Ultimate Survival Guide for Kids by Rob Colson

Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods from Dirt to Plate by John Kallas

Ultimate Explorer Guide for Kids by Justin Miles

Come Back Alive: the Ultimate Guide to Surviving Disasters, Kidnapping, Animal Attacks, and Other Nasty Perils of Modern Travel by Robert Young Pelton

The Worst Case Scenario Survival Handbook by Joshua Piven

The Ultimate Situational Survival Guide: Self-Reliance Strategies for a Dangerous World by Robert Richardson

Complete Survival Manual by Michael S. Sweeney

 

Supply List

 Potato Batteries

3-inch copper nails

3-inch zinc nails

Potatoes

Thin, plastic-coated wire

1-volt LED light bulbs

Wire cutters 

Solar Stills

Wide plastic basin

Smaller jar

Plastic wrap

String or rubber bands

Stones

Salt

DIY Compasses

Bowls

Water

Sewing needles

Magnets

Craft foam

Scissors

Shelter Race

Large plastic garbage bags

Lengths of nylon rope

Sticks, branches, leaves, etc.

Solar Oven Pizza Nachos

Empty pizza boxes

Box cutter

Page protectors

Foil

Tape

Pencils

Nacho ingredients - chips, cheese, etc.

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Offer a variety of fun activities that teach wilderness survival science, as well as demonstrate scientific principles. These activities can be adapted for indoors, but if your library has an outdoor space available, that will be ideal. Try to have an adult staff member or volunteer present at each station to guide the teens through each activity. Divide teens into groups and have them rotate between stations, or if your group is small enough, do each activity together. Teens will collect a stamp on their wilderness survival card as they complete each activity. Teens who complete their survival cards will be entered into a raffle to win cool survival prizes.

 

These activities are merely suggestions. You may use some or all of them and supplement with your own ideas. Consider inviting community members, such as scout troops, to demonstrate and lead different activities.

 

Stations

Solar Stills

Solar Oven Pizza Nachos

Potato Batteries

DIY Compasses

Shelter Race

 

Incentives

Survival kit - include paracord, Mylar space blanket, first aid supplies, lightweight poncho, tarp or large plastic trash bag, canteen, MRE meals, etc.

 

Copy of The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks or other survival manual

 

Activity Resources

Wilderness Survival Card

Activity Instructions

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Boy Scouts of America Longhorn Council http://www.longhorncouncil.org

Clean Water Using the Sun https://www.education.com/activity/article/Cleaning_Water_middle

Daniel G. Benes Outdoor Survival Science Shows available in Central Texas https://scienceshows.tech

Girl Scouts of Central Texas https://www.gsctx.org

How to Build a Solar Oven https://www.homesciencetools.com/article/how-to-build-a-solar-oven-project/

How to Make a Solar Oven http://mamaguru.com/how-to-make-a-solar-oven

Outdoor Channel “Survival Science” TV show http://outdoorchannel.com/survival-science

Potato Light Bulb Experiment for Kids https://sciencing.com/potato-light-bulb-experiment-kids-12105514.html

Simple Magnetic Compass for Kids https://web.kidsactivitiesblog.com/28674/make-a-compass

Solar Energy Facts https://www.conserve-energy-future.com/various-solar-energy-facts.php

Survival Science: Shelter http://kitchenpantryscientist.com/survival-science-shelter

 


 

Activity 3: I Am Jane Doe Documentary Screening

 

Introduction

The catalyst for the events of Disappeared is the kidnapping and subsequent trafficking of Sara Zapata’s best friend. Sara uses her position as a newspaper reporter to bring attention to the issue and investigate her friend’s disappearance. The atrocities of human trafficking are very real and present in our world today. Trafficking affects over 300,000 people annually in Texas alone, and does not discriminate by gender. Educate teens and their parents about the issue by inviting them to the library for a screening of I Am Jane Doe, a documentary which takes a focused lens into human trafficking.

 

Books to Display

Slavery Inc.: The Untold Story of International Sex Trafficking by Lydia Cacho

Dime by E.R. Frank

Hidden Girl: The True Story of a Modern-Day Child Slave by Shyima Hall with Lisa Wysocki

Human Trafficking Around the World: Hidden in Plain Sight by Stephanie Hepburn and Rita J. Simon

Fifteen Lanes by S. J. Laidlaw

Girls Like Us: Fighting for a World Where Girls Are Not For Sale, An Activist Finds Her Calling and Heals Herself by Rachel Lloyd

Sold by Patricia McCormick

Never Missing, Never Found by Amanda Panitch

Trafficked by Kim Purcell

Saint Death by Marcus Sedgwick

Breaking Free: True Stories of Girls Who Escaped Modern Slavery by Abby Sher

 

Supply List

Access to the movie, which is available on Netflix, iTunes, Vimeo, Google Play, Amazon, and DVD

Projector and/or laptop and associated cables

Screen or blank wall

Seating

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Invite teens and their parents to the library for a screening of I Am Jane Doe, which looks at the legal battle several American mothers are waging on behalf of their teen daughters, who became victims of sex trafficking on the internet. Educational licenses are available for screening the film in a public library.

 

Due to the sensitive nature of the subject matter, this event is suitable for mature teens. The film is unrated, but recommended by the creators as PG-13. Make information about the film available to parents beforehand so they can decide if it is appropriate for their family. The film is graphic in parts, but does an excellent job of bringing awareness to the issue of human trafficking, which is paramount for keeping teens safe.

 

Consider contacting organizations within your community, such as Traffick911, which currently serves sixteen Texas counties, to find out about hosting a speaker or workshop in conjunction with the film. Facilitate a discussion after the film and encourage parents and teens to have an open dialogue with each other about human trafficking. Provide handouts or other resources for parents to continue the discussion.

 

Activity Resources

Tips for Talking to Teens About Human Trafficking handout

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Educational License for I Am Jane Doe https://vimeo.com/ondemand/iamjanedoeedu

How to Teach Teens About Human Trafficking https://www.usnews.com/high-schools/blogs/high-school-notes/articles/2017-02-21/3-ways-high-schools-can-educate-teens-on-human-trafficking

Human Trafficking By the Numbers: The Initial Benchmark of Prevalence and Economic Impact for Texas sites.utexas.edu/idvsa/files/2017/02/Human-Trafficking-by-the-Numbers-2016.pdf

Human Trafficking Resources for Teens, Students, Teachers, and Leaders https://aheartforjustice.com/2014/02/13/human-trafficking-resources-for-teens-students-teachers-and-leaders/

I Am Jane Doe Website https://www.iamjanedoefilm.com

Start the Conversation: How to Talk to Kids about Trafficking http://humantraffickingsearch.org/start-the-conversation-how-to-talk-to-kids-about-trafficking/

Start the Conversation: Teenagers and Sex Trafficking https://yourteenmag.com/health/physical-health/teenagers-and-sex-trafficking

Study Estimates More than 300,000 Victims of Human Trafficking in Texas https://news.utexas.edu/2017/01/24/there-are-300000-victims-of-human-trafficking-in-texas

Texas-based Traffick911 http://www.traffick911.com

Trafficking Resources for Educators https://crees.ku.edu/sites/crees.ku.edu/files/docs/Trafficking%20Resources%20for%20Educators.pdf


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Passive Program 

Printable Copy

Edible Plants

 

These passive programs are intended as supplementary activities to promote Disappeared. Passive programs can be set up and left in the teen space, so that any teens passing through can participate. They are a way to reach teens who may not be able to attend a scheduled library program, and require minimal monitoring from the librarian.

 

Passive Program 1: Geography of Ourselves

 

Introduction

Faced with unimaginable stressors, Sara and Emiliano Zapata ultimately come to the decision to cross the border from Mexico into the United States at the climax of Disappeared. Sara and Emiliano’s story is one example of the immigration experiences that America is founded on. Teens will create a world map showing all of the diverse places on the planet that they have come from to end up together at the library. This activity encourages sharing stories of family history and is a visual reminder of the connections teens have to places all over the world.

 

Books to Display

Love, Hate, and Other Filters by Samira Ahmed

American Panda by Gloria Chao

Something in Between by Melissa de la Cruz

The Good Braider by Terry Farish

Girl Mans Up by M-E Girard

Refugee by Alan Gratz

The Radius of Us by Marie Marquardt

When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

Rani Patel in Full Effect by Sonia Patel

You Bring the Distant Near by Mitali Perkins

Illegal by Bettina Restropo

I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Ericka L. Sánchez

American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang

The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

American Street by Ibi Zoboi

 

Supply List

Large map of the world

Push pins

Yarn or string

Scissors

Post-it notes

Pen, pencils, markers, etc.

Bulletin board, wall, or other display surface

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Post a large map of the world on a bulletin board or other surface. Place push pins, yarn or string, scissors, post-it notes, and pens or other writing utensils nearby. Include instructions asking teens to place a push pin on the map in the place where they or their family originated. Place a centralized push pin on your city. Teens can then connect the push pins with yarn to show the journey that they or their family have taken to eventually end up in Texas.  The post-its can be used to share the year or other details of their own or their family’s immigration experience.

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Immigration Lesson Plan for Grades 6-8 https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/lesson-plans/teaching-content/immigration-lesson-plan-grades-6-8/

PBS The New Americans Resources for Educators http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/newamericans/foreducators.html      

 


 

Passive Program 2: Surviving Texas

 

Introduction

Emiliano Zapata must make his way through the harsh South Texas desert on his treacherous journey to cross the border and find safety in the United States. Because of his previous wilderness training with the Jiparis, he is confident in his ability to survive the conditions of the land. Turn your teen space into a survival training ground with a display of native edible plants, a DIY paracord bracelet station, and a wilderness survival game.

 

Books to Display

The Islands at the End of the World by Austin Aslan

The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks

Into the Hurricane by Neil Connelly

The Living by Matt de la Pena

Crossing the Wire by Will Hobbs

The Distance Between Lost and Found by Kathryn Holmes

Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods from Dirt to Plate by John Kallas

The Worst Case Scenario Survival Handbook by Joshua Piven

Complete Survival Manual by Michael S. Sweeney

A Map for Wrecked Girls by Jessica Taylor

Nature’s Garden: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants by Samuel Thayer

Wild Bird by Wendelin van Draanen

Bound by Ice: A True North Pole Survival Story by Sandra Neil Wallace

 

Supply List

Display

Bulletin board, wall, or other display surface

Green butcher paper or tan kraft paper

Pictures and descriptions of plants

Staples, tape, or push pins

Optional: artificial leaves or vines

 

Paracord Bracelets

Table

Paracord (may be purchased from craft stores or Amazon)

Plastic buckles (may be purchased from craft stores or Amazon)

Scissors

Ruler

 

Survival Game

Worst Case Scenario Survival Game (available on Amazon)

OR

Printed copies of survival simulation game

Pencils

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Challenge your teens to build their survival skills with the following activities.

 

Native Edible Plants Display

This display will teach teens about edible plants native to Texas. Green butcher paper or tan kraft paper makes a fetching background to display information about native Texas edible plants. Include pictures of each plant and information about uses and where they can be found. Focus on plants that are native to your area. Optionally, use artificial leaves or vines as an eye-catching border. Encourage teens to take a walk outside to see what plants they can forage in their own neighborhood.

 

Paracord Bracelets

Paracord bracelets are a useful survival tool because they allow an individual to store several feet of rope on their person in a compact and easily accessible fashion. Place supplies and instructions on a table in the teen space. Either print out instructions, which can easily be found online, or provide a laptop or tablet with a link to an instructional YouTube video. Note that many paracord bracelet tutorials require the ends to be finished with a lighter. There are options for finishing the ends without using fire, so be sure to direct teens to these tutorials. Optionally, create “take and make” baggies with instructions and enough supplies for a bracelet in individual baggies.

 

Survival Game

Create a station with the Worst Case Scenario board game and encourage teens to play, or print out copies of a survival simulation game and challenge teens to rank the items in order of necessity in a survival situation.

 

Activity Resources

List of suggested plants

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Foraging Texas – Merriwether’s Guide to Edible Wild Plants of Texas and the Southwest http://www.foragingtexas.com/

Instructions to make a paracord bracelet with a side release buckle http://www.instructables.com/id/Paracord-bracelet-with-a-side-release-buckle

Scouting Web Survival Simulation Game http://scoutingweb.com/scoutingweb/subpages/survivalgame.htm

Texas State Library and Archives Commission Into the Wilderness: Survival of the Fittest https://www.tsl.texas.gov/ld/projects/trc/2005/manual/survivalofthefittest.html

Video instructions to finish a paracord bracelet without a lighter https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DapxayDDj4

Wild Edible Texas http://www.wildedibletexas.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster

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Created on Mar 27, 2018 | Last updated April 02, 2018