Author Feature-Gary Paulsen

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

Middle School

Featured Author

Gary Paulsen

Gary Paulsen

This Side of Wild

 

The product of a difficult childhood, Paulsen ran away from home at the age of fourteen. His experience in diverse jobs and a wide range of interests have provided the basis for much of his written work. His stories are woven from his personal experiences, and many of them feature outdoor settings and the harmony of nature. Several of his books deal with the theme of survival and human endurance.


 

 


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Book Trailer

 


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Book Quiz

 

Printable Copy

 

This Side of Wild Quiz

 

1. Why did the author look like "a flying porcupine"?

                a. He was hopping away from a porcupine as it shot its quills

                b. He was thrown from a horse and his arrows went flying.

                c. He was galloping so fast on his horse that his bag of arrows shook up and down.

                d. A snake made him jump and his arrows went flying out of his bag.

 

2. How did Josh let the author know whether or not he approved of the two horses that where delivered?

                a. He said "Those are two mighty calm horses" to the author.

    b. He walked around them a few times and then spun in a few circles, then stood and wagged his behind.

    c. He didn't approve of the horses; in fact he tried to convince the author they were too wild to keep.

                d. He walked under them, touched his nose to theirs, and then sat and "nodded" at the author.

 

3. Corky the poodle was said to be "too rambunctious." What does rambunctious mean?

                a. protective

                b. rowdy

                c. lazy

                d. sick

 

4. Which of the following is NOT an example from the book of an animal training a person?

                a. A bird making noise to attract people.

                b. Bears getting food from humans.

                c. A snake rattling its tale in warning.

                d. A cat purring when being petted.

 

5. Why are humans needed to help with lambing (birthing lambs)?

                a. Genetically modifying sheep to increase wool and meat production has decreased their ability to protect and                 teach their offspring survival skills.

                b. Just like humans, doctors are needed while giving birth.

                c. Only one lamb is born each day, so lambing happens year round.

                d. Humans aren't needed; they just like witnessing the miracle of birth.

 

6. Why did it look like Louise was floating two and a half feet off the ground?

                a. The fog was so thick it you couldn't see the bench she was laying on.

                b. She was lying on the backs of the sheep, but the fog was so low you couldn't see the sheep below her.

                c. She was running on a fence, but the fog was so thick you couldn't see the fence.

                d. Louise was so far away, it looked like she was higher than the author and Louie.

 

7. Louise stopped letting the author pet her. Why?

                a. He smelled like lamb.

                b. She didn't want to be petted while she was trying to sleep.

                c. She was mad at him for shooting one of her flock.

                d. She was mad at him for spending more time with the flock than with her.

 

8. How did wilderness "collide" with the rest areas?

                a. Birds flocked to the cars to eat bugs and bees took over the water fountain.

                b. Birds blocked people from accessing the water fountain.

                c. Bees kept people from getting back in their cars.

                d. Birds and bees kept people from getting out of their cars at the rest area.

 

9. How does the author feel about trapping animals?

                a. He thinks it is a great way to hunt.

                b. He thinks it is okay as long as the meat is used for eating.

                c. He doesn't think people should trap animals unless they are professionals.

                d. He thinks trapping is wrong, no matter the reason.

 

 

10. What did the ravens do when they realized the humans had food for the sled dogs?

                a. Returned with many of their friends to feast.

                b. Returned each day to be hand fed by the humans.

                c. Waiting patiently for the dogs to finish eating each day and then finished what was left in the bowls.

                d. Attacked the humans as they were feeding the sled dogs.

 

 

 

 

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Academic Programs 

 

Printable Copy 

Matching Worksheet

Graphic Organizer

Rubric

Research Worsksheet

 Academic Program - This Side of Wild 

  • Introduction

    Gary Paulsen’s This Side of Wild shares anecdotal stories from his own adventure filled life that highlight the special relationship between human beings and animals. Readers of this short memoir will reflect on animal intelligence, and the companionship animals provide to people while participating in the activities listed in the unit. For a final project, students will work individually or in pairs to produce an Infographic or Thinglink of an animal they have researched.

     

    TEKS

    §110.18 20 English Language Arts and Reading: 1, 2, 7, 10, 11a, 12a, b, 13, 17c. d, 22a, b, 23a,d, 24, 25a, c, 26a,b,c, 27.28.

    §126.14-16 Technology Applications: 1a, b, 3, 4a, c,e,f 6m,n

    Science > State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness Resources > 3.B.8.B - categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences shared among groups; and (Readiness Standard)

    Science > State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness Resources > 4.5.10.A - compare the structures and functions of different species that help them live and survive such as hooves on prairie animals or webbed feet in aquatic animals; (Readiness Standard)

     

     

    Activity 1 Title

    Are You Smarter than a Poodle?

     

    Activity 1 Introduction

    This is the introductory activity for the project that will set the stage for the unit through discussion and viewing a video on animal intelligence. Students will complete a graphic organizer in preparation for the final class discussion.

     

    Activity 1 TEKS

    §110.18 20 English Language Arts and Reading: 1, 2, 7, 10, 11a, 12a,b, 13, 17c, 22a,b, 23a,d, 24, 25a, c, 26a,b,c, 27.28.

     

    Activity 1 Detailed Description of Activity

    1. Discussion. 

    Students will participate in a short discussion facilitated by the teacher/librarian using a graphic organizer to collect information and provide details for the discussion following the video.

    Pass out the graphic organizer- Animal Intelligence- and allow students to put their names on top.

    Ask the students to think of and list some of the animals from Paulsen’s book and share their answers. Allow time for students to write in some of the animals in the first bubble on the graphic organizer.

    Ask the students to be thinking of any comparisons they can make between Paulsen’s animals (sled dogs, Corky, Gretchen, the horses, the ravens, etc.) and animals that they may see in the film.

    Also, any of following or similar questions may be posed:

    Do you think animals are smart? 

    Are some animals smarter than others?

    Why do you think animals are or are not smart?

    Can you think of anything any of your pets have done or other animals you have seen or heard of that show they have intelligence?

    How do animals communicate?

     

    2. Show the video, Animal Intelligence (Discovery Education)

    The video may be downloaded from Discovery Education and shown in it’s entirety or in parts and is editable. See the teacher resources for additional material to add to your discussion/lesson.

     

    3.  Graphic Thought Organizer.

     

    After the video ask the students to compare the video animals to the animals from Paulsen’s books. Can animals be taught or are they teaching us? What do you know about animal intelligence now? Allow students to work in pairs or small groups to finish their graphic organizers.  End the class with an in-depth discussion of animal intelligence by reviewing the organizer and asking: Are animals intelligent? How do we know? Did this activity change or enlighten your perceptions? 

     

    Books to Display or Book Talk

     

    See Read-Alikes list in addition to the following:

     

    Davis, Nicola. Talk, talk, squawk! : a human's guide to animal communication. N.p.: Candlewick Press, 2015.

     

    Facklam, Margery, and Pamela Johnson. What does the crow know?: the mysteries of animal intelligence. San Francisco: Sierra Club for Young Children, 1994.

     

    Marrin, Albert, and C. B. Mordan. Oh, rats!: the story of rats and people. New York, NY: Dutton Children's , 2006.

     

    Peterson, Francine. Koko's Kitten. N.p.: Scholastic, 1985.

     

    Tomecek, Steve. Animal communication. New York, NY: Chelsea House Publishers, 2009.

     

    Activity Supply List

    Pencils to fill out graphic organizer

    Graphic Thought Organizer-Animal Intelligence

     

    Activity Resources 

    Graphic Thought Organizer - Animal Intelligence

     

    Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

     

    See “Books to Display” section

     

    All About Animals Teaching and Assessment Resource. Perfection Learning, 2006.

     

    Animal Intelligence Colgren Communications,  1994 . Full Video.

    Discovery Education. Web. 21 January 2017. <http://www.discoveryeducation.com/>.

     

    Especies Fact Sheets

    http://www.kidsplanet.org/factsheets/map.html

     

    National Geographic Kids

    http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/

     

    Smithsonian National Zoo

    https://nationalzoo.si.edu/

     

     

    Activity 2 Title

    Birds of a Feather Flock together

     

    Activity 2 Introduction

    This activity addresses the subject of animal communities and communication. Many animals in Paulsen’s group live in communal groups that function better than that of humans. This activity starts with a prediction activity wherein students try to guess the name of various groups of animals (i.e. a gaggle of geese). Then students will be asked to research various animal communities and how they communicate.

     

    Activity 2 TEKS

    §110.18 20  English Language Arts and Reading: 1, 2, 7, 10, 11a, 12a,b, 13, 17c, 22a,b, 23a,d, 24, 25a, c, 26a,b,c, 27.28.

     

    Activity 2 Detailed Description of Activity

     

    1. Students will each be given the Animal Group matching worksheet and asked to try to determine the name of each group. The teacher may give examples of groups introducing this brief activity.

     

    2. After about five to seven minutes the teacher will share the answers and discuss the unique names of groups with the students, transitioning into Activity 3.

     

    Examples of questions to aide in the discussion:

     

    Why do you think a group of ravens is called a murder? What experience does Paulsen relate in his book that illustrates this to be a fitting name for a group of ravens?

     

    What is the most interesting or funny name of an animal group that you noticed? 

     

    What do we call groups of humans? 

     

    Why do we have so many different group names for human beings?

     

    3. End the discussion by transitioning in to Activity 3

     

    Activity 2 Books to Display

     

    See Read-Alikes list in addition to the following:

     

    Davis, Nicola. Talk, talk, squawk! : a human's guide to animal communication. N.p.: Candlewick Press, 2015.

     

    Facklam, Margery, and Pamela Johnson. What does the crow know?: the mysteries of animal intelligence. San Francisco: Sierra Club for Young Children, 1994.

     

    Marrin, Albert, and C. B. Mordan. Oh, rats!: the story of rats and people. New York, NY: Dutton Children's , 2006.

     

    Peterson, Francine. Koko's Kitten. N.p.: Scholastic, 1985.

     

    Tomecek, Steve. Animal communication. New York, NY: Chelsea House Publishers, 2009.

     

    *Display any nonfiction books that you may have on various animal communities and animal communication. 

     

    Activity 2 Supply List

    Animal Group Matching Worksheet - one for each student

    Pencil for each student

     

    Activity 2 Incentives

    No incentives necessary, but a prize could be awarded to the student(s) who get the most correct answers on the animal group matching worksheet.

     

    Activity 2 Activity Resources

    Animal Groups Matching Contest/Activity

    Research - Animal Groups worksheet/organizer -  up to 6 different sheets for up to 6 different groups

     

    Activity 2 Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

     

    "Animal Group Terminology." Animal Group Terminology. Sandbox Networks, Inc., 2017. Web. 21 Jan. 2017.

    http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0004725.html

     

    Tersigni, Dean. "Animal Groups." Animal Groups. N.p., 2010. Web. 21 Jan. 2017.

    http://www.thealmightyguru.com/Pointless/AnimalGroups.html

     

    Activity 3 Title

    What’s your tribe? (pack, colony, pod, etc.)

     

    Activity 3 Introduction

    In this activity, students will be divided in up to 6 groups of 2 to 4 students. They will research the communities and communication of one different assigned animal per group. Then they will share their research with the class. This activity should be combined with Activity 2 and take two class periods.

     

    Activity 3 TEKS

     

    §110.18 20  English Language Arts and Reading: 1, 2, 7, 10, 11a, 12a,b, 13, 17c. d, 22a,b, 23a,d, 24, 25a, c, 26a,b,c, 27.28.

     

     

    Activity 3 Detailed Description of Activity

     

    Preview Research Animal Groups worksheets (6) to decide how many animal groups you wish the

    class to research.

     

    2. Divide the class into groups by any chosen method. Groups may be preassigned, random or by student choice.

     

    3. Give each student in each group the same worksheet to use while researching the group’s animal (dolphins, ants, wolves, gorillas, ravens and prairie dogs). Animals chosen for this activity are communal in nature and have structured societal groupings. They also interact with humans collectively (ravens in Paulsen’s book) or individual instances (i.e. Koko the gorilla).

     

    4. Read the worksheet with the class and review the items to be researched.

     

    5. Students will use library resources including nonfiction books and databases to complete their assignments. Sources should be cited, but this activity is not intended to be an in-depth research assignment.

     

    6. Group members will take turns sharing their research with the class.

     

    Activity 3 Books to Display

     

    Books and resources pertaining to dolphins, ants, wolves, gorillas, ravens and prairie dogs should be available for research in addition to display.

     

    Davis, Nicola. Talk, talk, squawk! : a human's guide to animal communication. N.p.: Candlewick Press, 2015.

     

    Facklam, Margery, and Pamela Johnson. What does the crow know?: the mysteries of animal intelligence. San Francisco: Sierra Club for Young Children, 1994.

     

    Marrin, Albert, and C. B. Mordan. Oh, rats!: the story of rats and people. New York, NY: Dutton Children's , 2006.

     

    Peterson, Francine. Koko's Kitten. N.p.: Scholastic, 1985.

     

    Tomecek, Steve. Animal communication. New York, NY: Chelsea House Publishers, 2009.

     

    Activity 3 Supply List

     

    Research Animal Groups Worksheets for each student

    pencils

     

    Activity 3 Incentives

    Not applicable

     

    Activity 3 Activity Resources

    School databases for research (Britannica online)

    Nonfiction library books or classroom books

    (See Activity 3 Books to Display)

    Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

     

    See “Books to Display” section

    All About Animals Teaching and Assessment Resource. Perfection Learning, 2006.

     

    Animal Intelligence Colgren Communications,  1994 . Full Video.

    Discovery Education. Web. 21 January 2017. <http://www.discoveryeducation.com/>.

     

    Especies Fact Sheets

    http://www.kidsplanet.org/factsheets/map.html

     

    National Geographic Kids

    http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/

     

    Smithsonian National Zoo

    https://nationalzoo.si.edu/

     

    Activity 4 Title

    Create an Animal Infographic or Thinglink

     

    Activity 4 Introduction

    Students will apply what they’ve learned about animal intelligence and communication to create an Infographic or Thinglink about their animals.

     

    Activity 4 TEKS

     

    §110.18 20  English Language Arts and Reading: 1, 2, 7, 10, 11a, 12a,b, 13, 17c. d, 22a,b, 23a,d, 24, 25a, c, 26a,b,c, 27.28.

    §126.14-16 Technology Applications: 1a,b, 3, 4a,c,e,f 6m,n

     

    Science > State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness Resources > 3.B.8.B - categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences shared among groups; and (Readiness Standard)

     

    Science > State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness Resources > 4.5.10.A - compare the structures and functions of different species that help them live and survive such as hooves on prairie animals or webbed feet in aquatic animals; (Readiness Standard)

     

    Activity 4 Detailed Description of Activity

     

    1. Students will work individually, in pairs, or as a group to create an Infographic or Thinglink showcasing the information they have learned about the animal they were assigned in Activity 3.

     

    2. Students may need to research further to obtain more information and should have access to databases and library resources to perform further research.  See Infographic Rubric under Activity 4 Activity Resources.

     

    3. After reviewing Thinglink and/or Canva directions, students will be given a class period to create their infographic.

     

    4. Students will post their Infographics or Thinglinks to their blog or upload to their school’s learning management system, such as Canvas.

    Activity 4 Books to Display

     

    Books and resources pertaining to dolphins, ants, wolves, gorillas, ravens and prairie dogs should be available for research in addition to display.

     

    Davis, Nicola. Talk, talk, squawk! : a human's guide to animal communication. N.p.: Candlewick Press, 2015.

     

    Facklam, Margery, and Pamela Johnson. What does the crow know?: the mysteries of animal intelligence. San Francisco: Sierra Club for Young Children, 1994.

     

    Marrin, Albert, and C. B. Mordan. Oh, rats!: the story of rats and people. New York, NY: Dutton Children's , 2006.

     

    Peterson, Francine. Koko's Kitten. N.p.: Scholastic, 1985.

     

    Tomecek, Steve. Animal communication. New York, NY: Chelsea House Publishers, 2009.

     

    Activity 4 Supply List

     

    Computers for each student, or group of students

    Access to school databases and library resources

    Notes, worksheets from prior Activities in Unit

     

    Activity 4 Incentives

    This project may be graded.

     

    Activity 4 Activity Resources

     

    School databases for research (Britannica online)

    Nonfiction library books or classroom books

    (See Activity 4 Books to Display)

     

    Activity 4 Resources for Teens, Teachers and Librarians

     

    See “Books to Display” section

    All About Animals Teaching and Assessment Resource. Perfection Learning, 2006.

     

    Animal Intelligence Colgren Communications,  1994 . Full Video.

    Discovery Education. Web. 21 January 2017. <http://www.discoveryeducation.com/>.

     

    Especies Fact Sheets

    http://www.kidsplanet.org/factsheets/map.html

     

    National Geographic Kids

    http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/animals/

     

    Smithsonian National Zoo

    https://nationalzoo.si.edu/

     

     

 

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Active Programs

Printable Copy

 

Animal Talk - Get a chance to Explore Jobs & Careers with People who work with Animals

 

General Introduction to Active Program

Animal Talk is a program geared to showcase Gary Paulsen’s vignettes of animal memoir stories in This Side of Wild. In This Side of Wild, Paulsen describes his connection to the natural world, specifically describing his relationship and the behavior of both wild and domestic animals. This program will connect teens with professionals who work with animals and introduce them to possible venues for employment working with animals as either volunteers, students, and future careers.

 

Activity Title

Animal Talk - Get a chance to explore careers with people who work with animals

 

Activity Introduction

 

Invite and assemble a panel of four to five different professionals who work with animals.  Some possible professions to consider include: veterinarians, zoologists, guide dog trainers, animal shelter workers, farrier, aquarist, Animal Cruelty Investigator, bee farmer, Search & Rescue, K-9 units, Animal Rescue workers, trainers, and animal groomers. Who you will decide to invite will depend on your locale and what type animal professionals are available (i.e. if you live in Galveston a marine biologist would be a good choice).

 

Arrange for a date and space for the event. Professionals should be encouraged to bring their animals, if appropriate. Outdoor space might accommodate more people and animal messes would be easier to clean up.

 

Advertise the event with nearby schools that are in the area you provide service. Contact each school guidance counselor and/or librarian to aid in the dissemination of information on the event. You may even collaborate with a particularly vivacious counselor and ask them to emcee the event with you.

 

Set up a concession with proceeds from the concession going to a local animal shelter. The concession can be run by student volunteers. (optional)

 

Develop a schedule of presentations for the day.  The schedule will depend largely on who you have contacted as your experts.  A veterinarian may simply choose to speak on his or her profession, while an animal trainer can be enlisted to do a demonstration.

 

End the Event with a panel discussion with all your animal experts.

 

Books to Display or Book Talk

Animal trainer by Trueit, Trudi Strain

Careers for Animal Lovers and Other Zoological Types, Louise Miller

The Everything Guide to Working With Animals

I want to be a veterinarian by Grace, Catherine O'Neill

 

Activity Supply List

tables for panel discussion

tablecloths

thank you gifts for your presenters

water, drinks, snacks for presenters

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

http://www.insidejobs.com/blog/top-jobs-for-animal-lovers

=================================

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Passive Programs 

 

Printable Copy

Purrsonal Ad

Silly Pet Tricks

General Introduction to Passive Program

This program encourages animal lovers to pick up one of Gary Paulsen’s books, including THIS SIDE OF WILD. It will allow them to explore their creative writing abilities and general animal knowledge. Programming librarians will be able to both activities and leave the rest to users.

Activity 1 

Write a “Purr”sonal Ad

Activity Introduction

This activity allows animal lovers to help shelter animals find forever homes. Users will write bios for shelter animals, using wit or heartfelt words to pull at potential adopters’ heartstrings. It is a great hook to pair animal lovers with Gary Paulsen and THIS SIDE OF WILD.

Detailed Description of Activity

Find an area to display pictures of shelter animals with enough space for users to write comfortably. This can be a bulletin board with a table and chairs close by, or you can hang pictures using fishing line from the ceiling over the writing area. Using binder clips or clothespins to hang the pictures will allow you to change out the pictures if needed.

Print off pictures of adoptable pets from a local shelter. You may want to partner with one particular shelter or multiple shelters in your area. You can do as few or as many pictures as you wish. More photos give more options for users. Include dogs and cats, but you can also include other pets shelters may have in your area. Include each pet’s name with their picture. Also include the contact information for the shelter on the display.

In the writing area, have plenty of paper, writing instruments, dictionaries & thesauri for users to complete the task. Directions for the activity can be on the display (if using a bulletin board) or the writing area, but need to encourage users to captivate potential adopters with humor or heartfelt words. Websites to assist users with ideas are provided. 

You can decide whether to have finished ads turned into library staff or posted on the display next to the animal for which it was created.

Books to Display or Book Talk

List of possible titles to display. Can be from Read-A-Like List or Annotated Bibliography


Straydog by Kathe Koja
Adopting Pets:How to Choose Your New Best Friend by Bill Gutman
Strudel’s Forever Home by Martha Freeman
Dog Days for Delaney by Jen Jones

 

Activity Supply List

Printed animal shelter pet pictures

Paper for writing ads

Pencils, pens, and markers for creating ads

Tape, staples, or fishing line for picture display

 

Incentives

Dog bones or cat treats can be given to users who complete the activity to share with their own pet.

Another idea would be cookies shaped like bones, dogs, or cats for human consumption.

 

Activity Resources (Produced by the Committee)

Flyer-Write a.pdf

Examples of finished product:

“Look at the loyalty in those eyes! Don’t they scream “I’ll love you forever?””

“Casper needs a forever home. If his eyes look loyal, you should get to know his heart. It will melt yours.”

“Need a friend? Oh, good. I need a home! Let’s hit the dog park and grab a pizza.”

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

"Pet Profiles: How to Write Animal Bios to Get Your Adoptables Into Homes." Best Friends Animal Society. N.p., 30 Mar. 2016. Web. 04 Jan. 2017.
Gutman, Bill, and Anne Canevari. Green. Adopting Pets: How to Choose Your New Best Friend. Brookfield, CT: Millbrook, 2001. Print.
Koja, Kathe. Straydog. New York: Speak, 2004. Print.
Freeman, Martha. Strudel's Forever Home. New York: Holiday House, 2016. Print.
Jones, Jen, and Paula Franco. Dog Days for Delaney. North Mankato, MN: Stone Arch , a Capstone Imprint, 2014. Print.

=================================

Activity 2 Title: Silly Pet Tricks

Activity 2 Introduction

Participants will post pictures of their pet with a short caption explaining a silly pet trick it can complete. Patrons will vote for their favorite and winner will receive a small prize.

Activity 2 Detailed Description of Activity

Reserve bulletin board or wall space for participants to post pictures and captions.

Print information participants will need before posting. You can have a line or word limit to keep things concise.

Decide on a deadline for posting, and then open voting for a given amount of time (1-2 weeks should be plenty) Display posters and/or handout flyers to encourage patrons to vote for their favorite.

Once a winner is decided, reward the patron with a small prize. If you have a library newsletter, consider publishing the picture and silly pet trick in the next installment.

Activity 2 Books to Display

Gary Paulsen’s Books: My Life in Dog Years, Field Trip, Road Trip

Activity 2 Supply List

Bulletin board or wall space

tape or push pins

paper voting slips

container for voting slips

writing instruments

 

Activity 2 Incentives

No individual incentives are needed for this activity.


Activity 2 Activity Resources

Silly Pet Tricks.pdf

Example:

 

Henry can ride a skateboard.

 

Activity 2 Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Paulsen, Gary, and Ruth Wright Paulsen. My Life in Dog Years. New York, NY: Delacorte, 1998. Print.

Paulsen, Gary, and Jim Paulsen. Field Trip. New York: Wendy Lamb, 2015. Print.

Paulsen, Jim, and Gary Paulsen. Road Trip. New York: Wendy Lamb, 2013. Print.


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Resources

Academic Programs

Academic Program

Matching

Graphic Organizer

Rubric

Research Worksheet

Active Programs

Active Program

Animal Talk

Annotated Bibliography

Book Quiz

Passive Programs

Passive Program

Purrsonal Ad

Silly Pet Tricks

Read-A-Likes

 


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Created on Mar 7, 2017 | Last updated April 17, 2017