Author Feature-Jennifer Mathieu 2018

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

High School

Featured Author

Jennifer Mathieu

Jennifer Mathieu

 

 

 

Find her on the web:

 Website

 

 


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Book Trailer

Used with permission from Hannah Bailey, Librarian, Houston Christian High School

 


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Book Discussion Questions 

Printable Copy

 

Vivian does not like the fact that her mother begins dating a man who has a Republican political sticker on his car. What are the risks of basing your judgment of someone based solely upon how they do or do not vote?

  

Vivian’s best friend is at first reluctant to support the Moxie movement and call herself a feminist. Why do you think this is so? Did the book challenge any misconceptions that you may have had about feminism, and if yes, what?

 

What impact do the acts of rebellion--wearing bathrobes, the zines, the stickers--have upon the culture of her school?

 

What do you think about Mitchell not getting punished for his actions? Do you think the police should have gotten involved? What about Principal Wilson’s actions?

 

Vivian struggles between the desire to help others and her own fear in addition to her anger.  Can she can be true to herself and at the same time be an angry feminist?  How would you handle these two seemingly opposing feelings?

 

What did you think about the word “feminism” before you read the book?  Have your thoughts changed about the word after you read the book?  In what ways has your idea of the word “feminism” changed?

 

In Moxie Seth and Mitchell are two different representations of a male perspective in the novel.  Discuss the ways that they are similar and the ways that both characters are different.  Think about the way each one of them has grown up and the influence their parents have on their attitudes.

 

The novel Moxie has stirred up some controversy in the media about the way the students defied various adults in the novel.  What is your opinion about the girls standing up to the administration and the various adults in the book?  Do you think that the controversy is justified?

 

Some critics have pointed out that there should have been more characters of various races, sexuality and disabilities in the book.  Why do you think that these characters should or should not have been added to the story line?  What kind of difference would it have made in terms of where the story was set and how the story ended?  

 

 If you were to make a sequel to this book, what secondary character in Moxie would you make as the main character in the new book?  What issue would you like to see them tackle the same way Vivian did in Moxie?  What would be other unique ways to protest in the same manner that Vivian did?


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Academic Programs 

Printable Copy

 Academic Program: 1

 The History of Feminism

 

 

 

Introduction

Students in English and Social Studies classes grades 9-12 will learn what the definition and history of feminism in American culture beginning in the 1960s.

 

 TEKS

 §130.203.Political Science (c) 4. (A, B, C)

§110.31. English Language Arts and Reading, English I (b) 16

§113.40. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies, High School (c) 26 (c)

 

 

Books to Display

 Introducing Feminism: a Graphic Guide by Cathia Jenainati

Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World edited by Kelly Jensen

My Beautiful Hippie by Janet Nichols Lynch

Grrrls on the Side by Carrie Pack

Feminism A to Z by Gayle E. Pitman

 

 

Supply List

Poster paper, 5-6 sheets

Blank paper for each student

Video on feminism

Computer and projector

Markers, pens

 

Detailed Description of Activity

In Moxie,  Vivian Carter becomes empowered to stand up against the misogynist culture in her school when she discovers one of her mom’s feminist zines from the 90’s.  Vivian has witnessed several incidents at school where several boys are getting away with sexist remarks and being exempt from following rules that girls are being forced to follow.  She creates zines anonymously and starts a movement to bring this injustice to the forefront.  In this activity students will discuss the definition of “feminism” and talk about the misunderstandings of the word. They will then create a comprehensive definition of the word and talk about the preconceived ideas that people have about the word and the movement after viewing a short video of interviews.  Students will break into groups of three to four and create a “What Feminism Means to Me” poster and discuss their ideas with the other classroom groups.

 

 

Incentives

 

Students having the opportunity to be heard and voice their ideas and opinions of the word feminism.  They will have their posters placed around the classroom for other classmates to see.

 

Activity Resources

Definition of Feminism derived from The Ranger Video

 

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Teachers/Librarians: Teaching Feminism, Masculinity and Gender

 

 

 


 

 

Academic Program: 2

 So You Want to Protest?

 

 

 

Introduction

In the novel Moxie, written by Jennifer Mathieu, the main character Vivian Carter protests against the way some females student were being treated by male students and administrators.  She takes the idea of protesting through zines, the same way her mother did when she was in high school.  Looking back in history there were many forms of protest both in violent and non-violent ways.  In order to encourage students to protest peacefully about issues that they find important to them teachers will give them the opportunity to do so in a classroom setting.

 

 

 

TEKS

§110.30. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading, High School (b) 9 (d)

§110.30. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading, High School (b) 12 (a 

§110.30. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading, High School (b) 15 (b/d)

§113.40. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies, High School (c) 30 (a)

§113.42. World History Studies (b) 5

§113.42. World History Studies (c) 21 ©

§113.42. World History Studies (c) 24 (a)

§113.42. World History Studies (c) 31 (a,b)

 

 

 

Books to Display

Teenage Rebels: Successful High School Activist from the Little Rock 9 to the Class of Tomorrow by Barrett Dawson

Social Protest edited by Gillard, Arthur

Who Will Shout If Not Us?: Student Activists and the Tiananmen Square Protest, China 1989 by Ann Kerns

Civic Unrest:Investigate the struggle for Social Change by Marcia Amidon Lusted

Mahatma Gandhi and India’s Independence by Ann Malaspina

The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano by Sonia Manzano

Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu

Blueprint for Revolution : How to Use Rice Pudding, LEGO Men, and other Nonviolent Techniques to Galvanize Communities, Overthrow Dictators, or Simply Change the World by Srdja Popovic and Matthew Miller

All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely

12 Incredible Facts about the Montgomery Bus Boycott by Lois Sepahban

The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas

 


Supply List
 

Whiteboard or chalkboard

 Markers

Poster Board

Tri-fold poster boards

 

Detailed Description of Activity

In the novel Moxie, written by Jennifer Mathieu, the main character Vivian Carter fights back against arcane rules and thinking in her small Texas town.  She takes to anonymously writing zines in giving the females in her school a way to show their solidarity, to fight back and to do it all in a peaceful manner.  Throughout the years there have been many people who have also fought back against laws and societal ideals that were repressive for a particular segment in society. 

 

 In this activity, teachers and librarians will take students through a short historical lesson of some of the most well known non-violent protests in history through database research, videos and library books.  Teachers will then guide students to think about what issues and injustices in the present day that they would like to stand up against and civilly protest against.  These brainstorming ideas will be written on the board.  Students will join groups with others who feel strongly about a certain topic.  Each group will research and come up with solid facts about their topic and revisit the issue and see if the facts they found still align with the injustice.  If they do they will continue on to create a display about the issue and come up with some way to protest the issue in a non-violent way.  

 

 The projects will then be displayed in the library so students and teachers can vote on the issue that they feel most strongly about.  The top issue can be taken to a student council or advisory board for further review and define the steps that need to be taken in order to give a voice to the message of injustice to the entire school and/or the community if this additional step is supported by school administrators. 

 

 

Incentives

Students will have the opportunity to have their voice heard by other students, teachers, administrators and community members by displaying their project in the library for a museum of modern day non-violent protest.  The issue will then be taken to a student council or advisory board for further action such as student led fundraisers, school wide and/or community awareness, or community service.

 

 

Activity Resources

 American Civil Rights Timeline

Top Ten Nonviolent Protests

What is Non-Violent Protest

Methods of Nonviolent Action

 

 Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

https://www.tolerance.org/

http://deliberating.org/

 

 

 


 

 

Academic Program: 3

Moxie Critique

 

Introduction

In Jennifer Mathieu’s Moxie she creates a character whose ideas come into conflict with her friends, her classmates, teachers and administrators in her school.  Readers will have their own personal feelings about the conflicts with the novel as well.  This activity will allow students to voice their opinions of the novel as a whole.

  

TEKS

§110.30. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading (b) 5 (b/c)

§110.30. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading (b) 13 (b)

§110.30. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading, High School (b) 15 ©

 

 

Books to Display

The Everything Guide to Writing Nonfiction all You Need to Write and Sell Exceptional Nonfiction Books, Articles, Essays, Reviews, and Memoirs by Richard D. Bank

Writing Literature Review by Jose L.Galvan and Melissa C. Galvan

Afterward by Jennifer Mathieu

Devoted by Jennifer Mathieu

Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu

The Truth About Alice by Jennifer Mathieu

 

 

Supply List

Copies of the book Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu for reference

Notebook paper for notes

Poster sized paper or poster board

 

 

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Students will take notes and create their own list of top 10 worst and best moments of the novel.  They will critically analyze why they chose these 10 events in the novel and write them on a rough draft on notebook paper.  They will then present their list to the class in the style of Late Night with David Letterman 10 Ten.  Once the students have presented their list they will take the 10 best and worst events and write a critical review of the novel for display in the library.

 

Incentives

Students will have their work displayed in the library to voice their opinion of the published novel Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu.  The best critique can be emailed to the author for her review.

 

 

Activity Resources

Jennifer Mathieu's Website

David Letterman's Top 10 Video Clip

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

To be used as reference:

David Letterman's Top 10 Video Clip

 

 


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Active Programs


Printable Copy

Zinesters, Unite!

ZineTemplate

General Introduction to Active Program

After Vivian continues to see and hear about the injustices and abuse happening to the girls at her East Texas school, she begins to research her mother’s Riot Grrrl and starts a revolution of her own. She takes her school (and small town) by storm by creating an anonymous zine.

 

Activity Title

Zinesters, Unite! Mini-Fest

 

Books to Display or Book Talk

Make a Zine: Start Your Own Underground Publishing Revolution by Biel, Joe

The Riot Grrrl Collection by Darms, Lisa

Grrls on the Side by Pack, Carrie

The Vinyl Princess by Prinze, Yvonne

Whatcha Mean? What’s a Zine? by Watson, Esther

Stolen Sharpie Revolution: a DIY Resource For Zines and Zine Culture by Wrekk, Alex

 

Activity Supply List

Scissors

Glue sticks

A variety of color paper and cardstock

Black Sharpies of a variety of points (fine, medium, chisel, super)

Plain white copy paper

Black ball point pens

Pencils

Staplers

Rulers

3 hole punches

Tape

Correction fluid

String (yarn, ribbon)

Magazines

Newspapers

Access to a copy machine

Tables

Chairs

 

Optional:

television

laptop

tablets

access to video chat such as Skype, Google Hangouts, Facebook chat, Facetime

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Activity #1: What is a Zine? (informational session)

 

It’s good to provide some background information on the history and art of zine-making. A zine is a self-published mini-magazine with a small circulation. Zines tend to be non-profit and is usually created or produced by one person. Sometimes, though, it can be a collaborative effort amongst a small group of people.

 

Provide examples of zines either online or actual physical copies. Some public libraries have a collection of zines for physical or virtual check-out.

 

Discuss the different kinds of zines such as:

 

Fanzines (covers a particular tv show, movie, music, book; anything that zinester is a fan of)

Perzines (diary/journal format)

DIY

Literary (poems, creative writing)

Riot Grrls

 

Ideally, if possible, try to find a guest speaker that is well-versed in the world of zines, whether it be in person or video chat. Contacting the Austin or Houston Zine Fest could provide you with some possible contacts.

 

http://www.lonestarzinefest.org/

https://www.zinefesthouston.org

 


 

Activity #2: Zine Exploration

 

Provide a table or computers/tablets where teens can explore physical zines as well as e-zines. The University of Texas Libraries site (http://guides.lib.utexas.edu/zines) can provide some guidance on where to find e-zines, some of which you can download the PDF and print them out. Some public library systems also have e-zines, as well as physical zines, to check out.

 

If possible, invite local zinesters to set up a table with their zines so teen can browse through them and/or purchase them.

 


 

Activity #3: Zine Making

 

For this activity, teens will be given the opportunity to make their very own zine. The University of Texas (http://guides.lib.utexas.edu/c.php?g=576544&p=4240725) also has some great how-to videos on creating a zine as well as different methods of binding the zine.

 

Teens will need to decide on the subject matter for their zine as well as the size. Typically, zines are half sheets of regular 8x11 letter size paper. They can fold a few sheets in half and make them into a booklet or fold them twice and make a mini-zine. It can also just be one sheet of paper, if they’d like. Here is a quick example of a template that they can choose to reference (courtesy of Caro Griffin:  http://carolinesyrup.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Zine-Template-QP.pdf)

 

There is really no wrong way of making it, although, sometimes it can be helpful to number the pages, especially if there is an order to their zine. The other thing to keep in mind would be to leave about a ½ an inch to an inch of a border. Copy machines may cut off parts of the zine if the content bleeds onto the edges. They should spend the whole hour writing, creating, drawing, gluing their zines together. They can choose to create a cover out of the cardstock or decide not to, they can be as creative as they would like in creating their zines. The possibilities are endless.

 

If the person chooses, you can make a handful of copies of their zines if they plan to share it or if you plan to keep copies at your library. They can, then, decide how they want to bind them together. Typically, pages of a zine are stapled but if they would like to get creative, they can punch holes and bind them with yarn or ribbon.

 

Now, teens can share their creations with each other and they can be distributed wherever the teens would like to distribute them. They could leave a few copies in the library, school, hidden in books at the bookstores, anywhere!

 

Activity Resources (Produced by the Committee)

 Zinester, Unite!

Zine Template Q.P.

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Make a Zine: Start Your Own Underground Publishing Revolution by Biel, Joe

The Riot Grrrl Collection by Darms, Lisa

Grrls on the Side by Pack, Carrie

The Vinyl Princess by Prinze, Yvonne

Whatcha Mean? What’s a Zine? by Watson, Esther

Stolen Sharpie Revolution: a DIY Resource For Zines and Zine Culture by Wrekk, Alex

https://www.canva.com/

http://carolinesyrup.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Zine-Template-QP.pdf

http://guides.lib.utexas.edu/zines

http://www.lonestarzinefest.org/

https://www.zinefesthouston.org

 

*Note this activity did not have incentives


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Passive Program 

Printable Copy

What Feminism Is Display

 

General Introduction to Passive Program

These passive program will serve as an introduction to one of the main themes and subjects of Jennifer Mathieu’s Moxie: the Riot Girrrl Movement, women’s rights and feminism.

 

Introduction:

In Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu, Vivian Carter fights against the sexism and harassment from the male students, teachers and administrators in her small Texas town.  She starts a campaign to promote feminism in her school and encourages the female population to stand up and fight for the right to be treated fairly.

 

 

Activity 1 Title

Feminism Passive Display

 

Activity 1 Detail Description:

HS/Public Librarians will increase awareness and provide information about the concept of feminism to patrons through a display of what it means to be a feminist.  Written in the display should be the definition of feminism and bullet points with famous feminist movements and names are displayed as well.  QR codes will be displayed so that patrons can scan them and find out more about feminism on the internet.  Room can be left on the bulletin board for patrons to write the names or events of other feminist that they know; these can be names of famous people or those who they know personally.

 

 

Activity 1 Books to Display/Book Talk:

Feminism Unfinished:A Short Surprising History of Women’s Movements by Dorothy Sue Cobble

Daughters of Eve by Lois Duncan

In Defense of Women:Memoirs of an Unrepentant Advocate by Nancy Gertner

Feminism:Reinventing the F Word by Nadia Abushanab Higgins

Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World edited by Kelly Jensen

The Nowhere Girls by Amy Reed

Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin

 

 

Activity 1 Supply List:

A display area – bulletin board, flat-wall/shelf display, window

Quotes, names, pictures of famous feminist

Bulletin board letters to define the word feminism

QR codes that lead to web resources on feminism

 

Activity 1 Resources:

https://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/classroom-resources/k-12-students-feminism/

Pinterest: Feminism Library Displays

 

 


 

 

Activity 2 Title:

The History of Riot Grrrls Movement: A bulletin board display

 

 Activity 2 Introduction:

The Riot Grrls Movement, which took place in the early 1990s, was an underground movement for women’s rights. This movement, which focused on women in punk music and a Do-It-Yourself culture. Music was a method of self-expression for those involved the movement. This bulletin board display will introduce the movement to teens and provide them with a small part of history via a Riot button.

 

 

Activity 2 Books to Display:

Girls to the Front: The True Story of the Riot Grrrl Revolution by Sarah Marcus

Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy

Girrrls on the Side by Carrie Pack

The Nowhere Girls by Amy Reed

 

 

Activity 2 Supply List:

Butcher paper for bulletin board: black, red, pink, white

Button maker

Button maker supplies

Button maker templates

Magazines (especially those geared toward teens and/or rock music)

Colored pages

Glue sticks

Markers

 

 

 

Activity 2 Detailed Description of Activity:

This bulletin display would consist of a brief history of the Riot Grrrl Movement as well as a themed buttons for teens wear.  A brief history can be found here: http://www.feministezine.com/feminist/music/The-History-of-Riot-Grrls-in-Music.html

 

The Riot Girrrl had a general color scheme of red, pink, white and black. An internet search can offer some ideas/suggestions such as women playing musical instruments or female positive words/sayings.

 

The New York Times had an article in February of 2016, “Teaching with Protest Music”, about using music in lesson plans and proposed some interesting questions to get people to ask themselves such as:

 

“What did you notice in the song as you listened? How did it make you feel?
What did you hear that makes you say that?”

You could add these as decorative quotes on the display since a large part of the movement was communicated through music.  

 

The Riot Grrrl buttons can be purchased or created. If DIY is preferred, you would need to have a button making machine available or purchased. One popular site for button makers and button making supplies is americanbuttonmachine.com or badgeamintit.com but there are various websites/suppliers that could be used depending on your budget. In order to create your buttons, you can print out related Riot Grrl images from the internet or you can create your own such as images taken from popular teen magazines or music based magazines. An internet search is recommended search is recommended to get an idea of the types of images and symbols that reflect this movement. You will need the button maker templates in order to know what size the images should be as well as a variety of colored paper, glue sticks and markers.

 

 

 

Activity 2 Incentives:

Riot Grrrl Buttons (can be purchased or created)

 

 

 

Activity 2 Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians:

Websites:

americanbuttonmachine.com 

Badgeamintit.com

http://www.feministezine.com/feminist/music/The-History-of-Riot-Grrls-in-Music.html

https://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/02/04/lesson-plan-teaching-with-protest-music/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Resources

Academic Program

Active Program

Zinesters, Unite!

ZineTemplate

Annotated Bibliography

Book Discussion Questions

Passive Program

Read-A-Likes


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Created on Mar 27, 2018 | Last updated April 02, 2018