Author Feature-Jordan Sonnenblick

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

Middle School

Featured Author

Jordan Sonnenblick

Jordan Sonnenblick

Falling Over Sideways

Curveball: The Year I Lost My Grip

 

Jordan Sonnenblick always wanted to be a writer, so one day in 2003 he started the book that became Drums, Girls & Dangerous Pie. It was published in 2005 to great acclaim, and was named to several Best of 2005 lists. It was also chosen to be part of the “Go the Distance” literacy initiative, which is a collaboration between Muhammad Ali and Scholastic. Its sequel, After Ever After, was published in 2010 to many accolades.

 

In addition to also writing the critically acclaimed teen novels Notes from the Midnight Driver and Zen and the Art of Faking It, Jordan has written three titles for younger children: Dodger and Me, Dodger for President, and Dodger for Sale.

 

Jordan lives in Bethlehem, PA with the most supportive wife and lovable children he could ever imagine.


 

Find him on the web:

Website

 


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Book Trailer

 

 


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Book Quiz

Falling Over Sideways

Printable Copy

 

1.   Claire is not looking forward to her eighth grade year because

a. She had to wear glasses

b. She had gotten braces over the summer

c. She had only one friend in her homeroom

d.  Her classes were going to be very difficult

 

2.  Mrs. Selinsky, the science teacher,

a.  Is a brand-new teacher

b.  Has a daughter who supposedly behaved perfectly in middle school

c.  Suspended Claire’s brother when he was in middle school

d.  Presented her rules in a handout for the students

 

3.  At the dance studio, Claire

a. Has not been promoted to the high school class

b.  Is going to be in the same class with her friends

c.  Spends all her time doing ballet

d.  Enjoys being in a class with younger students

 

4.  When Claire’s father has a stroke, he

a.  Falls on the floor        

b.  Immediately stops talking

c.  Tells Claire to call her mom

d.  Says nonsense words and phrases

 

5.  When Claire’s mom and brother arrive at the hospital,

a.  They go to see Claire’s dad right away

b.  They don’t talk to Claire at all

c.  Matthew gets nervous and Claire’s mom remains calm

d.  Claire’s mom becomes hysterical and Matthew comforts Claire

 

6.  On the Monday after her dad’s stroke,  Claire

a.  Stays home from school so she can visit her dad

b.  Goes to school and finds out that many people know what happened

c. Makes sure no one finds out about her dad

d.  Gets in a fight with Roshni

 

7.  On Friday, seven days after the stroke, Claire’s dad

a.  Is able to communicate that he recognizes his family

b.  Has a feeding tube inserted

c.  Is unable to sit up

d.  Eats Chinese food with his family

 

8.  When Claire’s dad comes home from the hospital,

a.  He makes amazing progress with walking and talking

b.  He has no trouble eating his food

c.  He only wants to sleep

d.  He goes back to work on the book he was writing

 

9.  Claire’s history project includes

a.  Biographies of great dancers

b.  Descriptions of the Civil War

c.  A saxophone tribute to America

d.  A song about how several explorers died

 

10. At Thanksgiving,

a.  Claire’s mom purees her husband’s food, and he chokes on it

b.  Matthew discusses politics with his cousins

c.  Claire makes a pumpkin pie

d.  Claire’s mom burns the sweet potatoes

 

11. Claire and Mrs. Selinsky have an argument in class because

a.  Regina won’t be quiet during the lockdown.

b.  Claire gets a text from her mom about her dad

c.  Christopher is patting Claire

d.  Claire slapped Mrs. Selinsky’s hand

 

12. The students in Claire’s science group

a. Are all suspended for three days

b. Lie to Mr. Thompson, the principal

c. Are given detention after school

d. Find out the truth about Mrs. Selinsky’s daughter

 

13. Claire challenges her father to

a. Do his therapy exercises while she does her dance practice

b. Dance with her at the spring recital

c. Get back up on his exercise ball

d. All of the above

 

14. Claire finds out that Ryder has been mean to her all year because

a. He overheard Claire, Roshni, and Jennifer laugh at his band uniform

b. She plays the saxophone better than he does

c. He believes she thinks he is stupid

d. She told Regina that Ryder has a crush on Roshni

 

15. For the father-daughter dance recital, Claire

a. Has no partner and dances by herself

b. Partners with Alanna and Katherine in a trio dance

c. Dances with her brother Matthew and with her dad

d. Isn’t allowed to dance because she doesn’t have a partner.

 

 

 

Curveball: The Year I Lost My Grip

Printable Copy

 

1. Peter expected his first day of high school to be amazing.  The reality of the experience was quite a bit different.  What really happened?

 

  1. All the girls thought he was really cute, which made him blush.
  2. He got lost and was embarrassed to ask for help.
  3. Several coaches asked him to try out for their teams.
  4. He and AJ had a big fight.

 

2. How did Pete meet Angelika?

 

  1. In the cafeteria.
  2. AJ introduced them.
  3. In photography class.
  4. At a volleyball game.

3. What object does Angelika give to Peter to hold while she takes his picture?

 

  1. a brownie
  2. a camera
  3. a picture of his grandfather
  4. a baseball

 

4.  What does Peter’s grandfather do that causes Peter to worry?

 

  1. He takes Peter on a photo safari.
  2. He gives Peter all his camera equipment.
  3. He starts dating.
  4. He tells Peter to take a photography class.

 

5. What does Angelika get mad at Peter?

 

  1. He isn’t honest with AJ about his arm.
  2. He drinks too much at Linnie Vaughn’s party.
  3. He won’t tell his parents about his grandfather’s fall.
  4. He’s mean to Linnie Vaughn.

 

6. Why does AJ think Peter has the perfect life?

 

  1. Peter’s mom is there for him and his dad is very supportive.
  2. Peter’s grandfather
  3. Angelika
  4. All of the above.

 

7. Why does Peter think AJ has the perfect life?

 

  1. AJ’s mom lets him do whatever he wants.
  2. AJ is a gifted athlete.
  3. AJ’s dad never bothers him.
  4. All of the above

 

8. Stan Lee gives Peter some advice to find someone who needs help as a way of dealing with the problems in his life.  How does Peter act on the advice?

 

  1. Peter teaches AJ’s younger brothers how to take pictures.
  2. Peter helps Linnie Vaughn by taking amazing photos of her swim competitions.
  3. Peter videotapes his grandfather’s memories.
  4. Peter fixes AJ up with Elena Zubritskaya.

 

9. What happens to Peter’s grandfather that makes his family realize he has Alzheimer’s disease?

 

  1. He forgets to take the picture when he sees the eagle.
  2. He calls Peter to come help him when he falls.
  3. He gets lost on a snowy winter day and has an accident.
  4. He forgets his wife’s name.

 

10. Why does Peter’s father work so much?

 

  1. Peter’s sister is in college and likes nice things.
  2. He’s been working overtime to save money in case Grandpa has to move into assisted living.
  3. Peter’s photography hobby is very expensive.
  4. A and B.

 

 

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Academic Programs 

Falling Over Sideways

Printable Copy 

Supplemental Documents

Brain Quiz 

Brain quiz key

Brain and Neuron Quiz

Brain and Neuron Quiz Key

Model assessment rubric

Play-doh recipe

 

General Introduction:

 

In the book Falling Over Sideways by Jordan Sonnenblick, Claire’s father suffers a stroke.  She acts promptly, which helps him have a better chance of recovery.  The purpose of this academic program is to learn about the brain and different conditions and diseases that affect the nervous system such as strokes, and to find out if there are ways to prevent or lower the possibility of suffering from these conditions.   

 

There are two parts in this Activity.

 

Activity Title:  Learn about your brain and your nervous system

 

Part one: Parts of the Brain

 

Activity Introduction:  The brain consists of several parts.  Students will learn about major parts and the functions of each part.  They may also learn about neurons, which also have major parts and functions.

 

TEKS: 

 

Science, Seventh grade-12 b, c

 

Detailed Description:

 

Students will learn the parts of the brain by looking at a poster or web page. In groups of two or three, they will create a model of the brain that indicates the different parts by color using play-doh or clay (you can make your own play-doh by using flour, salt, and water. A recipe is included in the resources.)  They will be assessed on the accuracy of the model and by taking a brief quiz. This activity may be introduced at the end of one class period. Creating the models should take no more than one class period; the assessment may take part of another class period if students are still finishing the models at the end of the period. 

 

Have each color of the play-doh or clay divided into the number of student groups.  There should be six colors:  one for each type of lobe, one for the cerebellum, and one for the brain stem.   

Step one:  Project or hand out a detailed model of the brain for them to refer to as they create their brain model.  

Step two:  After the teacher checks the plan, students will retrieve their play-doh or clay. 

Step three:  Students will create their models and label the parts of the brain with names of the parts and the main functions of each. 

Assessment:  Models will be assessed using a rubric. 

As individuals, students will complete the brain quiz from the Resources section.

Differentiation for pre-AP or GT:  In addition to the brain model, students will create a model of a neuron using clay or play-doh and learn its parts and functions.

Step one:  Along with the brain handout or projection, also include a neuron handout or projection.  Students can plan their neuron model and their brain model at the same time.

 Step two:  same as above.

 Step three:  The neuron will also be labeled according to parts and their functions. 

 The assessment will include general neuron information.  (For extra credit, students could name the three kinds of neurons.)

 

Activity Resources (produced by the committee)

Brain Quiz

Brain quiz key

Brain and Neuron Quiz

Brain and Neuron Quiz Key

Model assessment rubric

Play-doh recipe

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers, and Librarians

 

http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html This website is a complete and detailed resource about the neurosystem, including the brain and neurons.  The Experiment section includes information on making models of both the brain and neurons.  There are engaging activities in the Games section.

http://www.macmillan.org.uk/images/cancerinfo/longdescriptions/cancertypes/brain-lobesandfunctions_2012_accessible.jpg This is an image of the brain to project that meets all the criteria of the model; a good image to project.   

http://easyscienceforkids.com/all-about-your-amazing-brain/ In this resource there is another good brain image, including functions, that could be projected. 

http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/anatomy/brain/Neuron.shtml  This is an image of a neuron that meets the criteria of the neuron model; it is also a good image that can be projected

http://www.mananatomy.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/neuron_types.gif This image shows the different kinds of neurons. 

 

Part two:  Brain Diseases and disorders

 

Activity Introduction:  There are several brain disorders that affect many people.  Students will learn about several of these, including stroke, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (also known as traumatic brain injury), and record your information on a handout.   Students may also learn about epilepsy, meningitis, Tourette’s syndrome, muscular dystrophy, or another neurological disorder. This part of the activity could be done in a computer lab or library setting.  Allow one or two class periods for this part of the activity, depending on the length of the class period and the makeup and abilities of the classes. The handout could be completed at home if not finished in class. 

 

TEKS:

 

Science, 7th grade-12 b,c

 

Step one:  Divide students into groups of three or four.  Assign each group one of the disorders.  Include in the selections stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Tourette’s syndrome, and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, also known as traumatic brain injury.  If you have more students that need topics, assign epilepsy, meningitis, and cerebral palsy, depending on how many students are in your class.  If more topics are needed, refer to this list from the National Institutes of Health: https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders and select disorders that the students might recognize.  Take a few moments to remind students not to plagiarize.    

 

Step two:  Students will consult print and online sources to answer the study questions on the Disorders and Diseases of the Brain handout in the Resources section below.  Suggested sources include books on the specific disorders, encyclopedias of diseases, subscription databases such as Encyclopedia Britannica and Gale Cengage that Texas school libraries may have available through TexQuest, reliable websites suggested in the Resources section or others that the teacher may be aware of and wish the students to use. 

 

Step three:  Students will make a presentation using Power Point or other presentation software to present the information learned about their disorder.  The presentation will consist of four sections:  Definitions and causes of the disorder, Symptoms of the disorder, how the disorder affects the life of the patient and the family and friends, and Prognosis (whether or not the disorder is curable and how long it might last).  Presentations may be made to the class (allow two more days for this) or to another audience within the school or outside. 

 

Alternatively, students can make a presentation board or poster using the information and including the same four sections.  These can be displayed in the library or around the school. 

 

Books to display in the Library to support this unit:

Falling Over Sideways by Jordan Sonnenblick

Curveball:  The Year I Lost My Grip by Jordan Sonnenblick

Pop by Gordon Korman

The Nervous System by Christine Taylor-Butler

Brain Injuries in Football by Stephanie Watson

Concussions in Sports by Mary Ann Hudson

Alive and Well in Prague, New York by Daphne Grab

Michael Vey series by Richard Paul Evans

The Last Book in the Universe by Rodman Philbrick

Meningitis by Melissa Abramovitz

Parkinson’s Disease by Melissa Abramovitz

Cerebral Palsy by Barbara Sheen

 

Activity Supply List:

Pencils or pens

Brain Disorder Handout for each group or student

Books about specific brain disorders and diseases, such as Parkinson’s or Stroke (see above)

Regular or disease encyclopedia (Britannica, World Book, UXL Encyclopedia of Diseases and Disorders), either online or in print, or both

  

Resources (provided by the committee)

Brain Diseases and Disorders Handout

Assessment rubric

 

 

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers, and Librarians

https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders : This page from the National Institutes of Health (U.S. Government) is one of the best sources for answering the questions on the handout.

Gale Cengage Science in Context online database:  If this resource is available to you either through TexQuest or as a subscription, it is an excellent source for answering the handout questions.

Encyclopedia Britannica online database:  If this resource is available to you either through TexQuest or as a subscription, it is a good source for answering the handout questions.  It is recommended to use the high school option rather than the middle school option because the topics will be easier to access.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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Active Programs


Falling Over Sideways

Printable Copy

Supplemental Documents

Brain Fest Flyer PDF

Brain Fest Flyer Word

SPOT Active Program for Falling Over Sideways

General Introduction:

The purpose of this program is to introduce tweens and young teens to brain functions, diseases, and disorders in an entertaining way.  It is mostly presented here as one large event that incorporates several smaller activities (stations), but activities might be done separately.  Some or all of them might be used, or you might find other activities that you prefer. 

There are two times during the year that this event would likely draw a fairly large group of participants.  One is Halloween, and the other is Brain Awareness Week in March.  For 2018, this will be March 12 through 18, and this week would be an opportunity where activities might be done separately over a period of two, three, or more days. 

You will need staff or volunteers to monitor the activities.

Activity Title: Brain Fest

Detailed Description: This festival can be done at one time with separate “stations,” or it can be done as separate activities over a period of several days.

Activity 1-paint a brain. 

Participants will paint a plaster of Paris brain

1.  Purchase or ask for donations of several brain-shaped molds and plaster of Paris, either traditional or quick-drying.   Be sure to follow the instructions for the plaster to avoid injury, especially for using eye protection and gloves. 

Amazon has some brain-shaped molds that would be good for this purpose that are not terribly expensive:

Cybrtrayd M197 The Brain Chocolate Candy Mold with Exclusive Cybrtrayd Copyrighted Chocolate Molding Instructions for $4.91 each (makes 4 brains)

HDE Frozen Brain Halloween Party Novelty Silicone Jello Chocolate Mold Ice Cube Tray $8.99 (makes 4 brains)

If you only have a few molds, you will need to allow more time for making the brains.   

2.  Purchase acrylic or tempera paints and paint brushes, or ask for donations from library patrons or the Friends of the Library.  You can use several different colors or limit the colors to pink and red. Acrylic paint is the most expensive, but it provides the best coverage. 

Alternatively, the participants could spray-paint the brains.  You would need to provide pink spray paint.  After this dries, they could add red blood vessels with a sharpie marker. 

Obtain some old shirts via donations or thrift store to use as paint smocks. 

Obtain old newspaper or plastic tablecloths for the tables you wish to use for the activity.  If you are spray painting, you will also need a large piece of wood or cardboard to place behind the spraying area. 

4.  On the day of the activity, place the brains and the paints on the covered tables.  Provide constant supervision for this activity as it takes place.

This link gives complete and detailed instructions on making a plaster brain and painting it with acrylic paint: https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/pdf/knowbrain.pdf

 

Activity 2-Brain Food

Participants will eat snacks that are good for brain health

Here is a list of finger food and easy snacks that are purported to be good for brain health:

Blueberries

Strawberries

Broccoli

Cauliflower

Avocado

Pumpkin seeds

Dark Chocolate (72 or more % cacao)

Whole grain crackers

Walnuts

Water

Almonds

Pomegranate

 

1.  Purchase or request donations of some or all of these foods so that each participant can sample a bit.  This does not need to be a large amount of each food, particularly in the case of dark chocolate that many teens won’t like. Cut the avocado on an as-needed basis or put a bit of lemon juice on it so it doesn’t turn brown, or make it into guacamole (recipe in resource section) and serve with a whole grain cracker or baked chip.

2.  Have small paper cups or mini-cupcake papers to put each sample in.  Set up samples on a table so participants can pick them up.  Have a trash can next to the table.  Make sure allergy information is prominently displayed. 

3.  Replace samples as they run low. 

This activity can be monitored by one or two volunteers. 

 

Activity 3-Games and puzzles

Participants will play online and/or paper and pencil brain related games (word searches, mazes, crossword puzzles, matching/memory games, etc.)

1.  Access the resources for games at the following sites:

                http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/chgames.html has online games as well as some that can be printed out. 

There are selections for individual players and groups.

                http://dana.org/AudienceContent.aspx?id=82756 

This site has links to a number of other sites with both online games and paper-and-pencil games you can print out. 

                http://www.gamesforthebrain.com/ online games of varying difficulty

               

2.  Provide computers, tablets, and/or handouts, pencils, and erasers.  Place the tablets and/or paper-and-pencil games on a table, and provide tables for the participants to use.  Monitors should take extra care if library-owned tablets are used for this activity.

Activity 4-Brain swim cap

Participants will make a “brain” cap that shows parts of the brain using a white swimming cap. This activity is described at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/chmodel.html

1.  Obtain white or light colored swim caps.  Swim outlet https://www.swimoutlet.com/swim-caps-c9633/ has many inexpensive options. Another source is http://www.allswim.com/Latex-Swim-Cap-p/500500.htm.  As an alternative, each participant could be responsible for purchasing his or her own inexpensive swim cap, or caps could be donated.  Make sure to ask for donations far enough in advance.

2. Arrange several swim caps on a table with permanent markers. Have handouts of a brain outline on the table as well, for participants to use as a reference.

3.  Have participants draw an outline of the brain on each side of the swim cap with permanent markers.

This activity will require adult monitoring to ensure that the markers aren’t used for alternative purposes such as writing on one’s peers, and that they don’t disappear with the participants. 

Alternative activity 4:  Papier maché brain cap

This activity is best started one day and finished the next. Participants will make a cap out of papier mache and balloons, and paint it with Tempera paint to represent a brain and/or its parts. 

1. Obtain balloons that will inflate to the size of a human head, tempera paints or water colors, newspapers cut in strips, and flour/water paste made with all purpose flour and enough water to make a paste in a consistency between white glue and pancake batter. 

2. Have participants inflate the balloons until about as large as a head. 

3.  Participants will make the caps by dipping newspaper strips and placing them on half of the balloon.  Be sure they don’t make the caps too thick or they will not dry in time. A hair dryer on low may be used to speed the drying.

4.  Allow to dry for several hours or overnight.

5.  Have participants pop the balloon and remove it from the cap.

6.  Guide the participants to paint the caps to look like brains.  Have a picture of simple brain parts available to use as a model.  The one in http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/chmodel.html under the “thinking cap” activity is a good picture, and others are listed in the resources section of this activity.

 

Activity 5-Brain information station, including information about disorders and diseases

This can be a passive activity with handouts and posters, or it can be a video or in-person presentation.  For Brain Awareness Week, the display can be more serious; for Halloween it might include some zombies and props related to Frankenstein’s monster and mad scientists. 

1.  Obtain materials on brain functions and common brain disorders and diseases such as stroke, dyslexia, mental health issues,  and others that would be of interest to your community.  An excellent source with many free resources is the National Institutes of Health, www.nih.gov.  Specific sections of interest include the following:

                https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/educational-resources/brain-basics/nimh-brain-basics_132798.pdf (this Brain Basics information can be printed as a handout or projected as a slide show (perhaps best on a touch screen device if one is available; it doesn’t advance automatically.)

                https://stroke.nih.gov/ Materials such as posters and bookmarks can be either downloaded or ordered for free from this page. 

                https://www.ninds.nih.gov/ This site is the gateway to information about diseases and disorders of the neurological system.  It is the starting place to find information about the disorders you wish to include. 

                https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Fact-Sheets As its name suggests, this site gives a list of fact sheets about various neurological diseases and disorders.

                https://www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml This site is the gateway to mental health information. 

2.  Make the information available to your participants in an attractive display.  If you are doing the activities over a period of several days, this display may remain available during the whole time. 

 

Books to display

Falling Over Sideways by Jordan Sonnenblick

Curveball: the Year I Lost My Grip by Jordan Sonnenblick

Paint the Wind by Pam Muñoz Ryan

Pop by Gordon Korman

The Brain : Our Nervous System by Seymour Simon

The Brain and Nervous System by Steve Parker

Brain Injuries in Football by Stephanie Watson

A Day in the Life of the Brain by Ana Maria Rodriguez

Cerebral Palsy by Barbara Sheen

 

Activity Supply List

Silicone or plastic brain molds

Plaster of Paris, either regular or quick-setting

Acrylic, tempera, and/or watercolor paints

Artist paint brushes in various thicknesses

Newspaper (to cut in strips and to cover tables)

Plastic tablecloths (an alternative table cover to newspaper)

Small paper cups or mini-muffin papers

Napkins

Brain foods:

Blueberries

Strawberries

Broccoli

Cauliflower

Avocado

Pumpkin seeds

Dark Chocolate (72 or more % cacao)

Whole grain crackers

Walnuts

Water

Almonds

Pomegranate

Pencils, pens, permanent markers

Game handouts

White or light colored swim caps OR balloons of any color

Hair dryer (if using Papier Maché)

Stroke kit from National Institutes of Health

Other brain resources from NIH, which can be ordered from  https://catalog.ninds.nih.gov/ninds/facet/Health-Topics/term/Brain , especially Brain Basics: Know Your Brain, Life and Death of a Neuron, and Understanding Sleep.

Incentives:

While none are really necessary, you may like to hand out brain shaped erasers (Oriental Trading company, $5.50 for 24), splat balls (Oriental Trading Company, $11.99 for 12),  realistic sticky brains (Oriental Trading Company, $12.99 for 12)  candy brains (Amazon.com, Gummy Brains Candy, 2.2lbs , $16.91), or brain keychains (Amazon.com, $5.74 for 6 + $4.43 shipping)  All prices are current as of February 2017.

Activity Resources (produced by the committee)

Fliers/posters for Brain Fest follow.  You can copy and modify these to suit your needs. 

Brain Fest

At your library

 

Learn about your amazing brain!

Do fun activities!

Sample food that is good for your brain!

Learn how to keep your brain healthy, and what can happen if you don’t!

 

 

Time and date:

 

Location (Street Address):

 

Contact information:

 

 

Brain Fest

At your Library!

 

Learn about your amazing brain!

Do fun activities!

Sample food that is good for your brain!

Learn about how to keep your brain healthy, and what can happen if you don’t!

 

Time and Date:

 

Location (street address):

 

Contact Information:

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers, and Librarians

Brain Awareness Week www.dana.org/BAW

Oriental Trading Company www.orientaltrading.com for brain incentives and zombie decorations

Open Clip Art www.openclipart.org for royalty-free clip art that can be used in any project, according to their terms of use.

Handout of brain information from the National Institutes of Health https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/educational-resources/brain-basics/nimh-brain-basics_132798.pdf  

Information on Stroke from the National Institutes of Health  https://stroke.nih.gov/

https://www.ninds.nih.gov/ This site is the gateway to information about diseases and disorders of the neurological system.  It is the starting place to find information about the disorders you wish to include. 

https://www.ninds.nih.gov/ Home page for neurological information from the National Institutes of Health  

Two sites for swim caps  https://www.swimoutlet.com/swim-caps-c9633/

and  http://www.allswim.com/Latex-Swim-Cap-p/500500.htm

For supplies and incentives  www.amazon.com

Site with many activities, games (both online and to print out) http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/chmodel.html

http://dana.org/AudienceContent.aspx?id=82756  This site has links to a number of other sites with both online games and paper-and-pencil games you can print out. 

Online games about the brain http://www.gamesforthebrain.com/

National Institutes of Health catalog of publications for ordering and/or downloading brain information https://catalog.ninds.nih.gov/ninds/facet/Health-Topics/term/Brain

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Passive Programs 

Falling Over Sideways

Printable Copy 

Instructions

 

General Introduction:

Music and language are two essential themes of Jordan Sonnenblick’s book Falling Over Sideways.  This activity expands on an assignment given to the main character Claire Goldsmith by her history teacher.  Students will write four line poems that may be set to music or presented as poetry or raps. 

 

Activity Title:

Rockin’ Rappin’ Social Studies

 

Detailed Description:

Use your knowledge of any topic from U.S history up to the end of the Civil War, Texas history, or geography to write a four-line poem using the following format:

 First line-the first part of your description

Second line-the name of your subject repeated twice

Third line-The rest of your description

Fourth line-the name of your subject repeated twice.

Examples:

Desert north, savannah south,

Africa! Africa!

River Nile from start to mouth,

Africa! Africa!

 

From Tennessee to Texas he did go,

Davy Crockett!  Davy Crockett!

He died at the battle of the Alamo,

Davy Crockett!  Davy Crockett!

 

Crossed the Delaware but not for fun,

George Washington! George Washington!

Became U.S President Number One,

George Washington!  George Washington!

Keep in mind that your poem must not contain any objectionable language or racial slurs. Use an online rhyming dictionary such as Rhyme Zone or Rhymer if you are having trouble finding words to rhyme. When you have written your poem, glue it on a piece of construction paper and give it to the librarian to display. You can sign it, or it can be anonymous. 

Extension:  Create a rap beat or a melody for your poem.  Use Virtual Piano(virtualpiano.org) to make a melody, or use the Songify app (Songify by Smule for Apple or Android) to make a song from your poem. 

 

Books to display: 

Any biographies of historical figures such as presidents, U.S. military generals, and other notable people of the time period

Any geography books with information and maps for continents (or countries currently being studied by sixth graders)

Falling Over Sideways by Jordan Sonnenblick

 

Supply list:

8 1/2 by 11 inch lined or computer paper, half sheets (8 ½ by 5 ½)

Pencils, pens, markers to write the poem

9 by 12 inch construction paper, half sheets (9 by 6 inches) for mounting

Glue in bottles or sticks or rubber cement for mounting the poems on the construction paper

Trifold board, large cardboard, or bulletin board for displaying finished poem

I-pad, android tablet, or computer to play back songs if recorded. 

 

Incentives such as star erasers, bookmarks, pencils, or pieces of candy can be used if desired. 

 

Activity resources: 

Printout of instructions as listed in the description above

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers, and Librarians: 

Websites:

 virtualpiano.org   Virtual Piano plays music using the computer keyboard.  It is free.

rhymezone.com   This free site will help students find rhyming words.  It also includes a thesaurus.  

rhymer.com   Another free rhyming dictionary

Apps:

 Songify by Smule   This free app for Apple and Android makes your text into a song.

Note:  It is best to download apps directly from the appropriate app store for your device rather than from third party providers, i.e. from the Apple Store or from Google Play.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster

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Resources

Academic Programs

Falling Over Sideways

Brain and Neuron Quiz

Brain and Neuron Quiz Key

Brain Quiz

Brain Quiz Key

Brain - No Labels

Play-Duh Recipe

Scoring Rubric

 

Active Programs

Falling Over Sideways

Brain Fest Flyer PDF  Word

Annotated Bibliography

Book Quizes

Falling Over Sideways

Curveball: The Year I Lost My Grip

Passive Programs

Falling Over Sideways

 

Read-A-Likes

 


If you have questions or comments for the Young Adult Round Table, contact the YART webmaster.

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Created on Mar 7, 2017 | Last updated April 17, 2017