Author Feature-Katherine Applegate

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

High School

Featured Author

A G Howard

Katherine Applegate

Wishtree


 

 

Find her on the web:

Author Website

 

 


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Book Trailer

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Wishtree Book Quiz

Printable Copy

1. What type of tree is Red?

  1. Palm
  2. Northern Red Oak
  3. Sycamore
  4. Ponderosa Pine

2.What is the traditional day for wishing on a wish tree?

  1. The Autumn Equinox
  2. The Fourth of July
  3. May 1
  4. Christmas Day

3. How do crows choose their names?

  1. From human names
  2. After their first flight
  3. From sounds they like to make
  4. All of the above

4. Why do the animals come out when Samar visits the tree?

  1. She is quiet and gentle.
  2. She brings them food.
  3. She pets them.
  4. She casts a spell on them.

5. Which animals name themselves after things they fear?

  1. Raccoons
  2. Owls
  3. Skunks
  4. Possums

6. What does each offering put on the wishtree represent?

  1.  A dream
  2. A desire
  3. A longing
  4. All of the above

7.  How did Red break the rule?

  1. Red talked to Stephen and Samar.
  2. Red threw the animals out of their homes.
  3. Red shook until her leaves fell off.
  4. Red spit on the crow.

8.  What was the first wish left on the tree?

  1.  I wish for a baby.
  2. I wish for a million dollars.
  3. I wish for someone to love with all my heart.
  4. I wish for peace.

9. What was Maeve’s gift?

  1.  She was a talented seamstress.
  2. She cared for sick people.
  3. She made delicious food for people.
  4. She was a masterful gardener.

10.  What gift was left for Maeve in the tree hollow?

  1.  A loaf of bread.
  2. A puppy.
  3. A baby.
  4. A cake.

 

 


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1. What type of tree is Red?

  1. Palm
  2. Northern Red Oak
  3. Sycamore
  4. Ponderosa Pine

 

2.What is the traditional day for wishing on a wish tree?

  1. The Autumn Equinox
  2. The Fourth of July
  3. May 1
  4. Christmas Day

 

3. How do crows choose their names?

  1. From human names
  2. After their first flight
  3. From sounds they like to make
  4. All of the above

 

4. Why do the animals come out when Samar visits the tree?

  1. She is quiet and gentle.
  2. She brings them food.
  3. She pets them.
  4. She casts a spell on them.

 

5. Which animals name themselves after things they fear?

  1. Raccoons
  2. Owls
  3. Skunks
  4. Possums

 

6. What does each offering put on the wishtree represent?

  1.  A dream
  2. A desire
  3. A longing
  4. All of the above

 

7.  How did Red break the rule?

  1. Red talked to Stephen and Samar.
  2. Red threw the animals out of their homes.
  3. Red shook until her leaves fell off.
  4. Red spit on the crow.

 

8.  What was the first wish left on the tree?

  1.  I wish for a baby.
  2. I wish for a million dollars.
  3. I wish for someone to love with all my heart.
  4. I wish for peace.

 

9.  What was Maeve’s gift?

  1.  She was a talented seamstress.
  2. She cared for sick people.
  3. She made delicious food for people.
  4. She was a masterful gardener.

 

10.  What gift was left for Maeve in the tree hollow?

  1.  A loaf of bread.
  2. A puppy.
  3. A baby.
  4. A cake.

 

 



Academic Programs 

Printable Copy

Title: In a Leaf of Their Own

 

In Wishtree by Katherine Applegate, the main character states that it is a “northern red oak, also known as Quercus rubra” and “one of the most common trees in North America” (p. 5).  The Wishtree goes on to further explain that it has “ridged, reddish-gray bark; leathery leaves with pointed lobes.” (p.6)  In this lesson, students will identify trees in their area by their characteristics using a dichotomous key.

 

TEK Science 7.11A - (A)  examine organisms or their structures such as insects or leaves and use dichotomous keys for identification;

 

Description of Activity:

You will need access to technology to complete this activity.  You will also need a few leaf samples for guided practice. 

 

Begin by showing information about the northern red oak and discussing its habitats, structural traits, etc., focusing on the leaves - https://gobotany.newenglandwild.org/species/quercus/rubra/

 

Show students one of the leaves that you have brought in from a Texas tree. Access Texas A&M’s “Trees of Texas - ID by Leaf” page - http://texastreeid.tamu.edu/content/idByLeaf/  Using your sample leaf, have students help you walk through the description/image choices and identify the tree that the leaf is from.

 

Allow students to practice this with a second leaf in the classroom if desired.

 

Take a walk in the area surrounding your school and use the site to narrow down by leaf the type of trees that you are viewing.  If you have mobile devices, use them as you walk.  If you do not, students can return to the classroom with their leaf samples and identify them there.

 

Extension:  Create a mini-poster by gluing on leaf and writing description of leaf’s name, origin,  and characteristics.

 

Books to Display:

 

Trees, Leaves, and Bark (Take Along Guides) by Diane Burns

The Book of Leaves : a Leaf-By-Leaf Guide to Six Hundred of the World's Great Trees by Allen J.                                                                        Coombes

Trees of Texas: An Easy Guide to Leaf Identification by Carmine Stahl and Ria McElvaney

 

Supply List: 

Access to the internet

2 - 3 leaf samples

Paper, glue, pencil

 

Activity 2

Title:  How Old Did You Say?

 

The Wishtree is very old, having lived over two centuries and forming 216 growth rings (p. 80).  Environmental forces have left their mark on it in the form of hollows made by woodpeckers, lightning, disease, or insects.  People have also left their mark on the tree by tying wishes to it and scratching a word into it.  In this lesson students will draw conclusions about how external factors influence the growth of a tree.

 

TEK Science 7.13A - (A)  investigate how organisms respond to external stimuli found in the environment such as phototropism and fight or flight.

 

Description of Activity:

 

Students will examine “tree cookies” to determine how old a tree was when the sample was taken as well as draw conclusions about any external factors that affected its growth. 

 

The study of tree rings for the purpose of dating a tree is called dendrochronology.

 

Begin the lesson by showing students this video of a dendrochronologist and discussing its content:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRYsAn5QLYo

 

Distribute tree cookies to students that you have either cut on your own from tree stumps, accessed from a science source such as a kit or regional science supply, or purchased: 

https://www.amazon.com/Tree-Cookies-Set-of-4/dp/B06WV7F1X8/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1516930962&sr=8-10&keywords=tree+cookies

 

Have students count the number of rings (the space between the lines) and tell how old the tree was when the slice was cut from it.  Examine the cookies for differences in ring size and discuss what could have caused it.

 

Here is some reference information:  https://learnforestry.com/lessons/grade3/2007/activity1_teacher_reference.pdf

 

Use these visuals to discuss what may have happened to these particular trees and :

https://learnforestry.com/lessons/grade3/2007/activity1_1.pdf

 

Allow students to create a tree cookie that represents their own life. Have them label the events that have affected the growth of each ring.

Pith = center ring - year they were born

Rings - one for each year

 

 Extension: 

 

Scientists, like archaeologists, have used dendrochronology not just to date trees, but also things made from trees like Viking ships.(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSOrt8cclMc)

 

 

Books to display:

Ancient Trees: Portraits of Time by Beth Moon

Desert Giant by Barbara Bash

Remarkable Trees of the World by Thomas Pakenham

 

Supply List:

Tree cookies or paper facsimiles from links provided in lesson

Blank paper for students to use to design tree cookies representing their lives.

Colored pencils, markers, or crayons to tree cookie design.

 

 


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Wishtree Active Program

Trace the Tradition

Printable Copy

  • Activity Introduction

    In Wishtree, many stories come together to explain how all of the characters are connected even over time.  This program is designed to help individuals tell stories of family traditions that have made an impact on who they are.

    Participants will have the opportunity to record stories about their family traditions.  These stories will be saved and recorded to share with others visiting the library either in person or online.  The goal of this program is to show that our traditions may be different but they are rooted in the same foundations of family and beliefs.  When people hear the stories behind traditions, then they will have a better understanding of the reasons why things occur.  Everyone has a story to share.

    Detailed Description of Activity

    1. Explain to your participants how important stories are to culture.  Watch a video together about how important stories are.  Below is a good TED talk  explaining how important stories are to us.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/dave_isay_everyone_around_you_has_a_story_the_world_needs_to_hear#t-138262

    1. Give each participant a handout with questions for them to answer to help them write the story.  Participants now write the story to record.
    2. Set up video studios with a camera and a comfortable chair or stool for participants to read or tell their tradition. 
    3.  Participants will go to the studio setup and tell their story about tradition.
    4. Once stories are recorded, participants can enjoy watching other stories about cultural traditions from the list of choices below.

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZFF8EuaGjM

                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWLGvaeDAlU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLHU0PP4UZE

    6.         Set a time when participants can access their video stories.

    7.         Set up a place online such as a youtube channel for participants to view all of the stories.

    Books to Display or Book Talk

    The Book of New Family Traditions: How to Create Great Rituals for Holidays and Every Day by Meg Cox

    The Great Treehouse War by Lisa Graff

    Family Traditions for a Fast-Paced World: Simple Everyday Rituals for Comfort and Connection

    By Jordan St Clair Jackson

    Resources

    The Art of Storytelling by Khan Academy Pixar in a Box https://www.khanacademy.org/partner-content/pixar/storytelling

    Let’s Make Your Project Video  by Kickstarter April 27, 2016 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3h828EtWoA

    OLAF'S FROZEN ADVENTURE Movie Clip - Family Traditions (2017) Frozen 2 Disney Animated Movie HD

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MVAUKxvLQQo

    What Defines Your Generation? | 0-100 by Soul Pancake January 31, 2018

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RqZQ_XOMbI

    How To Make A YouTube Channel! (2018 Beginners Guide) by CroatCode February 15, 2016

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b38ef8n1p4U

    Activity Supply List

    Computer/Projector to show beginning video

    Handouts with questions for participants to answer to write their stories

    Video equipment for participants to record their stories

    Platform to put stories together such as a website, youtube channel or wiki.

    Devices to watch the videos once participants are finished videoing.

    Incentives

    Each participant will walk away with a copy of his/her story as well as a link to their video.

    Activity Resources (Produced by the Committee)

    Tradition Story Starters

    Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

    http://www.pbs.org/circleofstories/educators/lesson1.html

    Activity 2

    Tradition! Tradition! Outdoor Movie Night

    Introduction

    With the active program for Wishtree, we are focusing on traditions to help us understand other cultures.  Participants will watch a film with tradition as one of its main themes.  One suggested film to watch is Fiddler on the Roof.

    Detailed Description of Activity

    Participants will watch a movie with tradition as its main theme such as Fiddler on the Roof.  Ideally, this movie could be watched outside with a tree or two around to further enhance the connection to the book, Wishtree.  If you have time and inclination, you could have a sing along with the songs in the movie as well.

    Books to Display

    Tradition by Barbara Isenberg

    Wonder of Wonders by Alisa Solomon

    Supply List

    Copy of movie to show

    Player to show movie

    Screen to watch movie

    Snacks if providing snacks for the movie

     

     


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PASSIVE PROGRAM

Wishtree by Katherine Applegate

 Printable Copy

Introduction to Passive Program

 In the book, Wishtree, everyone put wishes on the tree every year on May 1.  This activity could be done at any time of the year. In the following description, there are two separate .  You may either do it on May 1 or in the month of December on a Christmas tree.

 

Activity Title 1:  Make a Wish

In this activity, patrons are encouraged to write a wish or dream on a colorful strip of paper and add to a tree. 

 

Books to Display or Book Talk

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein 

Wish by Barbara O’Connor

You and Me and the Wishing Tree by Nancy Tillman

The Wishing Tree by Roseanne Thong 

The Wish Tree by Kyo Maclear

 

Activity Supply List

Tree (either one outside the library or another designated location or make one on a wall)

Colorful Paper Strips

Tape

Pens/Markers

 

Detailed Description:

Participants will write a wish or dream on a colorful strip of paper and add it to the tree.

 

 

 

Activity Title 2 :  Share a Wish

 

Activity Introduction

In this activity, patrons are encouraged to write encouraging notes and decorate the tree with them.

 

Books to Display or Book Talk

Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson

I Walk With Vanessa A Story About a Simple Act of Kindness 

The Little Book of Positive Quotations 

Step Right Up : How Doc and Jim Key taught the world about kindness by Donna Janell Bowman 

 

Activity Supply List

Tree (either purchased or made from recycled book pages)

Paper ornament shapes

Pens/Markers

Yarn

Paper Chain

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Share a Wish

This Share a Wish Tree Project is inspired by Katherine Applegate’s book, Wishtree.  A wishing tree is a popular custom in many cultures.  We encourage you to add positive wishes, quotes, prayers, and blessings to the tree.

 

To participate:

Choose a blank ornament on the shelf by the tree

Write a positive message for others to read.

Get a string from library staff at the circulation desk to attach to the garland on the tree.

 

Sometimes, life can be stressful, and you may NEED a positive message, please feel free to take what you need from the bulletin board outside the library.  Please do not TOUCH the messages on the tree.  We invite you to read them and let them encourage you.

 

Activity Resources (Produced by the Committee)

 

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

If you choose to make your own tree from book pages, here is a great resource for it.

http://www.rhondisrosecoloredglasses.com/paper-christmas-tree/

 



Resources

Academic Program

Active Program

Annotated Bibliography

Book Quiz

Passive Program

Read-A-Likes

Book Quotes


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Created on Mar 21, 2018 | Last updated March 28, 2018