Author Feature-Kayla Cagan

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

High School

Featured Author

Kayla Cagan

 


 

 

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Website

 


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Book Trailer

 


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Book Discussion Questions 

Printable Copy

 

Piper remarks a couple of times in the book that she can’t wait to get to New York City because it is “real.” Why do you think that Piper has this belief that her home in Houston is not as real as New York?

 

Piper has a negative relationship with her sister and also fights with her best friend several times in the book. What were your thoughts about the depictions of the relationships between the girls in the book? Is there a lesson to be learned by these relationships?

 

At one point in the book, Piper dates a boy in spite of the fact that he gave her friend Kit a bad review on her art project. Did you agree that Piper was betraying Kit, or, as an aspiring artist, did you agree that Kit would have to “toughen up” and get used to criticism?

 

At the beginning of the book, Piper remarks that she would never apply to a safety school. What did you think about Piper’s decision to only apply to the conservatory?

 

Piper spends a lot of time thinking about New York and idealizing her future life there. What are your thoughts about whether or not her actual experience will meet her expectations?

 

Marli angrily mentions that she knows why Piper was born and that she knows more than anyone in the house. How do you think this has ultimately affected Marli? Was it more positive or negative?

 

Kit creates a website for her “personal geography” project, but there seems to be a dispute amongst the other characters about whether a website as an art project. Do you think a website can be a representation of one’s personal geography? Why or why not?

 

Piper’s family new she was adamant about applying to attend one school, how could her parents done more to encourage her to look at more than one school? If you were Piper, what more would you have done to ensure that you could attend and pay for your college education?

 

Piper’s idol is Andy Warhol; who is someone you look up to and why?

 

Ms. Adams frequently writes quotes on her board that may affect her students, what quote from the book resonated with you? Why?

 

 



 


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Academic Programs 

Printable Copy

Visual Arts in Academic Libraries

Art Review Rubric

Exhibition Review

Making of an Exhibit

Oral Presentation Rubic

Academic Program: 1

Art Review

 

Introduction

Students participating in their school’s journalism program will write a review of another student’s artwork for potential publication in school and/or local online/print publications.

 

TEKS

§117.305. Art, Level IV (a-c)

§110.34. English Language Arts and Reading, English IV

            13 (A-C), 16 (A-G), 17 (A-B), 18, 19

§110.62. Journalism

§110.66. Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I, II, III/Newspaper I, II, III/Literary Magazine

 

Books to Display

The Anatomical Shape of a Heart by Jenn Bennett

You're Welcome, Universe by Whitney Gardner

The Fashion Committee by Susan Juby

The Gallery of Unfinished Girls by Lauren Karcz

Draw the Line by Laurent Linn

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

See What I See by Gloria Whelan

 

Supply List

Art Review Rubric derived from Weekly Art Critique

 

Detailed Description of Activity

In Piper Perish, the artwork Piper and her classmates displayed in the gallery at the end of their senior year was reviewed by a local college student for the university newspaper. For this activity, high school students participating in their school’s journalism program will attend the Library hosted art installation {or end of the year gallery walk of graduating art students}, and review a piece of art to the specifications of the journalism class instructor. Ones that meet the instructor’s criteria for publication will be published in online/print school publication and possibly recommended for city’s local online/print publication.

 

Incentives

Students having the opportunity to be published in the school and possible community news publications.

 

Activity Resources

Art Review Rubric derived from Weekly Art Critique

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Examples of Art Reviews:

            OpenLab at City Tech

            ARTSLANT

 


 

Academic Program: 2

Personal Geography Art Piece & Library Installation

 

Introduction

 High school senior art students (students who are in the highest level of art study), will create a “Personal Geography” art project that will be their “artistic mission statement” like Piper and her classmates were tasked with. At the completion of the projects, students will have the opportunity to display their artwork in an art gallery installation hosted/created in the school’s library.

 

TEKS

§117.305. Art, Level IV (a-c)

§110.57. Public Speaking I, II, III

 

Books to Display

The Anatomical Shape of a Heart by Jenn Bennett

You're Welcome, Universe by Whitney Gardner

The Fashion Committee by Susan Juby

The Gallery of Unfinished Girls by Lauren Karcz

Draw the Line by Laurent Linn

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

See What I See by Gloria Whelan

 

Supply List

To be provided by art teacher/department.

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Librarian(s) will collaborate with campus/district art teachers in the creation of a student centered art project and installation to be hosted in the school’s library – specifically working with seniors from the start of the school year, and the installation will be displayed beginning in March until the remainder of the school year. The artwork will be representative of the student’s “personal geography” that will by their “artistic mission statement” like the artwork Piper and her other senior classmates created over the span of their senior year.

 

Like at a real art gallery, the library will host a gallery showing of all of the students artwork in May (end of the school year) inviting school and district personnel, students, families as well as open it to the community. Visitors will have to opportunity to purchase student work if student(s) are willing to sell.

 

Incentives

Students will have the opportunity to display their artwork in the style of an art gallery, and will be able to sell their work.

 

Activity Resources

After collaboration between librarian and teacher, the teacher will ultimately be the one setting project parameters, due dates, expectations, etc.

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Showing Off: The Making of an Exhibit by Erinn Batykefer

Visual Arts in the Academic Library Jennifer Mayer

 


 

Academic Program: 3

Artist Representation

 

Introduction

Piper Perish idolizes the artist Andy Warhol and shows her adoration for him by the way she presents herself in her personal look and her knowledge of the artist. This program will require students to pick a famous artist (living or dead) to emulate – in looks and in knowledge.

 

TEKS

§117.305. Art, Level I -IV (a-c)

§110.51. Literary Genres (B.2.L)

§113.42. World History Studies (B.3)

§110.57. Public Speaking I, II, III

§110.31. English Language Arts and Reading, English I-IV (writing & research skills)

 

Books to Display

The Anatomical Shape of a Heart by Jenn Bennett

You're Welcome, Universe by Whitney Gardner

The Fashion Committee by Susan Juby

The Gallery of Unfinished Girls by Lauren Karcz

Draw the Line by Laurent Linn

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

See What I See by Gloria Whelan

 

Supply List

To be determined by classroom teacher.

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Piper Perish idolizes the artist Andy Warhol and shows her adoration for him by the way she presents herself in her personal look and her knowledge of the artist. This program will require students to pick a famous artist (living or dead) to emulate – in looks and in knowledge.

 

Students will need to dress like and act as closely to the artist’s personality. Students will also need to know bibliographical information on their chosen artist to be recited in “A Living Museum” style presentation. Students will also choose the most well-known art piece created by their chosen artist to display and discuss.

 

Research component:

Teachers should allow some time for in-class research. In collaboration with the campus librarian(s), librarian(s) can provide print and digital materials to assist with students research on their chosen artist as well as space to complete research (i.e. computer stations, etc.).

 

Activity Resources

Citation resource: http://www.citethisforme.com/

Oral Presentation Rubric via ReadWriteThink

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

To be used as reference:

Living Wax Museum: Researching & Portraying Influential People

Living History Research Project One

 

 


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Active Programs

Printable Copy

Active Program 1: Art & Life: Art Journaling with Piper

 

Activity Introduction

Piper expresses herself through journal entries and art in order to reflect, unwind, and meditate on the issues that are bothering her. Teens don’t have to be expert artists like Piper, however, in order to make the most of an art journal. This activity will introduce teens to the idea of art journaling through some examples from Piper Perish, and demonstrate how art journaling can be a creative and therapeutic activity.

 

Books to Display or Book Talk

Sketch!: The Non-Artist's Guide to Inspiration, Technique, and Drawing Daily Life by France Belleville-Van Stone

Art Before Breakfast: A Zillion Ways to be More Creative No Matter How Busy You Are by Danny Gregory

Steal Like an Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative by Austin Kleon

Dot Journaling-A Practical Guide: How to Start and Keep the Planner, To-Do List, and Diary That'll Actually Help You Get Your Life Together by Rachel Wilkerson Miller

 

Activity Supply List 

Journals

Discarded books in good condition

Pens

Colored pencils

Markers

Paint

Paintbrushes

Water

Old magazines

Old newspapers

Glue

Tables/chairs

Activity handout (provided by committee)

 

Detailed Description of Activity

 

Have teens register so that you know how many journals you will need. If your library cannot afford to purchase journals, consider using discarded library books or donated books that are in good condition and have teens paint over the pages. Another option is to ask teens to bring a journal or notebook with them to the program.

 

Prior to the program, collect art supplies such as markers, colored pencils, and paint. Also collect any magazines, newspapers, or discarded books that are no longer in circulation and ok for teens to cut up to use in their art journals. Put the supplies out on a table where teens will be able to select those which they would prefer to use.

 

At the beginning of the program, have teens select a journal and give them the activity handout that has been provided by the committee. Explain what an art journal is and how it can be used, and talk about how concepts of an art journal can be used alongside bullet journaling, or keeping a photo album, a planner, or a regular journal.

 

The blank page can be intimidating, so make sure that each teen who attends begins at least one page of their journal. Each teen’s art journal should reflect the unique way that they express themselves and keep track of their daily lives, thoughts, and troubles. This is also a good opportunity to talk to teens about found art and mixed media art like the kind that Piper makes in Piper Perish. Encourage teens to search for unusual mediums and focus on creating with what they have on hand instead of holding off until they have the “right” supplies or skills.

 

This program can take anywhere from 1 to 1.5 hours depending upon how long teens want to stay and use the materials provided. A librarian or staff member should stay with the teens throughout the entirety of the program in order to discourage negative self-talk. 

 

Activity Resources (Produced by the Committee)

Art Journaling Handout

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Mindful Art Studio - http://mindfulartstudio.com/how-to-start-an-art-journal/

 


 

Active Program 2: Sew Like Enzo

 

Activity Introduction

 

In Piper Perish, Piper’s friend Enzo gets inspiration from creating new outfits for his friends. Teens who want to learn how to sew may not have had opportunities to learn or know anyone who has the skills to teach them. A sewing machine can seem overwhelming to someone who is using it for the first time, but it is easy to set up a basic sewing class at a library and teach teens the skills they need to get started.

 

Books to Display or Book Talk

 

Teach Yourself Visually Fashion Sewing by Carole Ann Camp

Epic Cosplay Costumes: A Step-By-Step Guide To Making And Sewing Your Own Costume Designs by Kristie Good

Gertie's New Book for Better Sewing: A Modern Guide to Couture-Style Sewing Using Basic Vintage Techniques by Gretchen Hirsch

The Colette Sewing Handbook: Inspired Styles and Classic Techniques for the New Seamstress by Sarai Mitnick

Couture Sewing Techniques, Revised and Updated by Claire B. Shaeffer

DIY Wardrobe Makeovers: Alter, Refresh & Refashion Your Clothes: Step-By-Step Sewing Tutorials by Suzannah Hamlin Stanley

Girl with a Sewing Machine: The No-Fuss Guide to Adapting and Making Your Own Clothes by Jenniffer Taylor

 

Activity Supply List

 Sewing Machines

Tables/Chairs

Power Outlets

Scrap Fabric

Scissors

Thread

Bobbins

Seam Ripper

Rotary Cutter

Cutting Mat

Sewing Patterns

 

Detailed Description of Activity

This class will need to be taught by someone who has basic sewing skills. If no one at your library has these skills, consider contacting local sewing supply stores or tailors to see if anyone will be willing to provide the class. Your library may require teens and/or guardians to fill out a waiver, so make sure that you inquire about that before you advertise the class.

It is important to have teens register so you know how many sewing machines you will need. If your library does not own sewing machines, ask staff members to lend their machines for the class. Every machine is different, so if you are working with a variety of donated machines, be sure to practice on them first so that you will know how to answer questions as they come up during the class.

Collect scrap fabric and thread prior to the class. You will need the scrap fabric so that teens can practice different types of stitches, and a roll of thread for each machine. For a beginner class, it is wise to have novice students start with a thin fabric like cotton or linen and general purpose thread.

Before the class, set up the sewing machines and make sure each one has thread and an empty bobbin. When the class begins, have teens select a sewing machine. The class will have two parts.

For the first part you will be demonstrating how to use the machine and then having each student practice. First, demonstrate how to thread the bobbin, and then have the students practice threading the bobbin on their own machine. Next, show them how the bobbin goes inside the machine under the presser foot and needle. Then demonstrate how to thread the needle and have each teen practice this as well on their own machine. Last, demonstrate how to pull the bobbin thread up through the machine and explain how the bobbin thread and the thread through the needle work together to sew. The first part of the class will usually take 30-45 minutes depending upon the number of students and their skill level.

When both the bobbin and the needle have been threaded, you can then have teens select a fabric to work with and show them how to use the commands on the machine to create different types of stitches. Let the students have time to practice sewing with scraps of fabric and look at and ask questions about other sewing supplies. A class like this is also a good opportunity to talk to teens about different sewing supplies, such as rotary cutters, patterns, seam rippers, and cutting mats. You will want to give the students at least 30 minutes to 1 hour to practice and look at sewing supplies.

A single instructor can handle about 6 students who are beginners. If the class will have more than 6 students, find an assistant to help walk around and answer questions. It is not recommended to have more than 10 students per class. The class should take 1.5-2 hours.

 


 

Active Program 3: Pop Art Night at The Factory

 

Activity Introduction

In Piper Perish, one of Piper’s constant complaints is that she does not have the space to work in her crowded house. Give teens a space to be collaboratively creative by hosting an Andy Warhol-themed art night at your library.

 

Books to Display or Book Talk

Pop Art by Tilman Osterwold

Andy Warhol 365 Takes: The Andy Warhol Museum Collection by Staff of Andy Warhol Museum

 

Activity Supply List

Tables

Chairs

Tape

Paint brushes, variety of sizes

Acetate sheets, letter size

Acrylic paint, black and other assorted colors

Black and white photos of celebrities and public figures, letter size

Printer

Printer ink

Paper

Water

Paper towels

Cups

Paper plates

 

Detailed Description of Activity

At this art night program, teens will be using photos of public figures, acetate sheets, and acrylic paint to create some pop art. It is also an opportunity for teens to be collaboratively creative the way that Andy Warhol and his friends were at The Factory. The end result will be some works of art that have some Warhol flair and incorporate supplies that he would have used.

Prior to the program, find a large room where you can set up tables. Teens will be using paint during the program, so make sure that you specify in your marketing materials that they will need to wear clothes that can get dirty.

Collect all of the items on the supply list. You will need to print out some letter-size black and white photos of celebrities and other public figures. Andy Warhol was inspired by people he read about every day in magazines and newspapers, so try to stick to people who teens will be currently discussing. It is also a good idea to use photos that have high contrast if possible.

On the day of the program, set up the tables and chairs. When teens arrive, allow them to look through the photos you have collected and select one that they would like to work with. They will also all need to have a cup for water and a small plate to use as a palette. Have each teen set their picture down on the table and tape a sheet of transparent acetate over it. They can then use the brushes and different colors of acrylic paint to add color, outlines, and their own unique vision to their photo. Pop art is a way to analyze and respond to popular culture, so encourage teens to think about the effect that their chosen celebrity or public figure has on our society.

The final product can have a variety of forms. Teens may want to keep only the acetate and not the black and white photo, or bond the black and white photo to the acetate so that the color is layered over it. Sheets of acetate can also be layered on top of each other to add more details because the acetate is transparent. Acrylic paint dries quickly, so the teens should be able to take home their work of art at the end of the program.

During the program is a good opportunity to talk about the pop art movement as a whole as well as Andy Warhol his contemporaries like Roy Lichtenstein and James Rosenquist. The program should take 1.5-2 hours.

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Craftsy - https://www.craftsy.com/blog/2014/11/painting-on-acetate/

The Art Story - http://www.theartstory.org/movement-pop-art.htm

 

 

 

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Passive Program

Printable Copy 1

Printable Copy 2

Gaslighting Poster

Love is Respect

Domestic Violence

Symptoms of Abuse

Why Do They Stay

Passive 1: Art Scholarship Display

 

Introduction:

In Piper Perish, Piper needed significant financial assistance to attend her dream school. Unlike Perish, students should actively work to ensure that financial aid has been applied for prior to making any final decisions for college; one way to encourage this is by promoting/displaying college and scholarship information.

 

Activity Title:

Art College & Scholarship Display

 

Activity:

High school and public librarians will collaborate with school counselors and art teachers to create an Art College & Scholarship Display. Counselors and art teachers will provide information about scholarships for financial help with course, supplies, and housing costs at colleges offering art programs and degrees, which librarians can then share with their students/patrons.

 

Books to Display/Book Talk:

The Anatomical Shape of a Heart by Jenn Bennett

You're Welcome, Universe by Whitney Gardner

The Fashion Committee by Susan Juby

The Gallery of Unfinished Girls by Lauren Karcz

Draw the Line by Laurent Linn

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

See What I See by Gloria Whelan

 

Activity Supply List:

A display area – bulletin board, slat-wall/shelf display, window

Books to display

Art School Logos

Scholarship bulletins students can take and use to look and apply for scholarships

 

Activity Resources:

Resource Piper Perish Scholarship Bulletin Example

Texas Art Education Association scholarship information:

https://www.taea.org/TAEA/resources.asp?option=scholarships

 


Passive Program 2: Toxic Love

 

Activity Title

Toxic Love

 

Activity Introduction

One of the reasons Piper is so eager to escape to New York in Piper Perish is because she no longer wants to live with her abusive older sister, Marli. There are several instances in the book where it becomes apparent that Marli is abusive to their parents and her significant other as well. This passive display is designed to teach teens about the symptoms of abusive behavior, show them that anyone could be abused by a romantic partner, friend, authority figure, or other individual, and provide them with resources for finding relief from abuse.

 

Books to Display or Book Talk

Crush by Eve Ainsworth

Bad Romance by Heather Demetrios

Dreamland by Sarah Dessen

See No Color by Shannon Gibney

The You I’ve Never Known by Ellen Hopkins

The Truth Commission by Susan Juby

In Love and In Danger: A Teen's Guide to Breaking Free of Abusive Relationships by Barrie Levy

Boy Toy by Barry Lyga

How Long Does It Hurt?: A Guide to Recovering from Incest and Sexual Abuse for Teenagers, Their Friends, and Their Families by Cynthia L. Mather

The Girl Who Fell by S.M. Parker

Such a Pretty Girl by Laura Wiess

 

Activity Supply List

Bulletin board

Display stand or area for books

Push pins

Paper

Printer ink

Brochures/pamphlets from nearby youth shelters or other relevant organizations

Posters about abusive relationships (provided by the committee)

Signs with phone numbers and email address for abuse hotlines/information (provided by committee)

 

Detailed Description of Activity

High school and public librarians will need to print the information posters about abusive relationships and the resource signs and post them on a bulletin board that is accessible to teens. This bulletin will preferably be in a private area where teens may feel more comfortable approaching the board. Librarians are also encouraged to locate and procure brochures and pamphlets from any local resources, such as youth homeless shelters, where teens may go if they find themselves in an abusive situation.

 

Activity Resources (Produced by the Committee)

Symptoms of Abuse poster

Why Do They Stay? Poster

Gaslighting poster

Texas Abuse Hotline sign

Love is Respect sign

National Domestic Violence Hotline sign

National Childhelp Child Abuse Hotline sign

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

http://www.loveisrespect.org/

http://www.thehotline.org/

https://www.childhelp.org/hotline/

www.txabusehotline.org/

 

 

 

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Created on Mar 27, 2018 | Last updated April 02, 2018