Author Feature-Laurent Linn



Spirit of Texas Reading Program-High School

Featured Author

Laurent Linn 

Laurent Linn

Draw the Line

 Laurent Linn’s love for puppets led him to become an Emmy Award–winning puppet designer and builder in Jim Henson’s Muppet Workshop, creating characters for various productions, including the Muppet Christmas Carol and Muppet Treasure Island films, eventually becoming creative director for the Sesame Street Muppets. Originally from Dallas, Texas, his love for art led him to New York City where he is currently an art director/designer for children’s and teen books. And his love for transformative stories (and superheroes) led him to write and illustrate Draw the Line, his first novel. 
 

 

Find her on the web:

 

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Book Trailers

 

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Book Quiz/Discussion Questions

Printable Copy

 

  1. If you were a witness to someone being bullied, what would you do?
  2. If you were in this situation, how do you think your parents would react? Why
  3. If your parents didn’t react positively/supportively what could you do to help them understand?
  4. If you had a superpower what would it be? Why?
  5. Have you ever felt bullied or persecuted? What did you do to overcome that situation?
  6. Adrian uses his comics as a way to escape reality, and he uses his friends as inspiration for some of his characters. Do you think these characters are too similar to the real thing or do you think that he is doing his friends justice by their comic characterization?
  7. Adrian is inspired by the times of the Renaissance, what time period in history inspires you?
  8. What is your secret talent that you want to share with the world?
  9. What did you think about the format of the book with part of it being a regular book and part being a graphic novel? Did it add or distract from the story?
  10. Would you have released the video of Doug, or destroyed it, like Adrian did in the book? Why?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Academic Programs

Printable Copy of Program

Supplemental Documents

Brainstorming

Lined Paper

Mona Lisa

STAAR Writing Rubric

Vignette

Activity 1 Super Hero, Super You!

 

Introduction

In Draw the Line, Adrian Piper creates a comic of his superhero persona to express himself when dealing with situations that come up in his life. Most people have thought about what superpowers they would want if they had the choice. This activity encourages students to practice writing an expository essay while thinking about what superpowers they would want and why.

 

TEKS

English 1 - 8, 10 A, 11 B, 12 A-D, 13 A-E, 14 A-C, 15 C, 17 A-C, 18 A-B, 20 A-B, 21 A-C, 22 A-C, 23 A-E, 24 A-C

 

Books to Display or Book Talk

Dangerous by Shannon Hale

Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi

Hero by Perry Moore

V is for Villain by Peter Moore

Being Jamie Baker by Kelly Oran

Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson

 

Supply List

Brainstorming Web

STAAR Paper

STAAR Rubric

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Write to the prompt: If you could have one superpower, which would you choose? Describe how you would use this power to help people.


Physical superpower such as strength, speed, or super-vision
Transportation superpower such as wall-crawling or flight
Superpower that lets you control an element such as gravity, fire, or magnetic forces

 

Be sure to explain what power you would want and give a detailed explanation with examples.

 

Resources

Brainstorming Web

STAAR Paper

STAAR Rubric

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

See Books to Display above

 

Activity 2 Mona Lisa Reimagined

 

Introduction

Adrian Piper bases his comic persona in the Renaissance time, because that is where he feels connected. The Mona Lisa by Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci is one of his most famous works. It has universal appeal. What would happen if the Mona Lisa was reimagined in today's world?

 

TEKS

Art I TEKS: 1-A, 1-B, 2-C, 2-D, 3-A

 

Books to Display

Who was Leonardo da Vinci? by Roberta Edwards

Mona Lisa: A Life Discovered by Dianne Hales

I, Mona Lisa by Jeanne Kalogridis

The Smile by Donna Jo Napoli

Vanished Smile: The Mysterious Theft of the Mona Lisa by R.A. Scotti

 

Supply List

Color photocopies of the Mona Lisa

A picture to display or project of the Mona Lisa
12"x18" (30.5 x 46 cm) heavy weight Drawing Paper.
Drawing Pencils

Kneaded Rubber Erasers.
Ruler

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Discuss a little history concerning the artist Leonardo da Vinci. Ask the students what they think of the Mona Lisa painting and why he painted her?

 

Have students draw a one inch grid on the photocopies.

 

Draw a grid on the drawing paper (using the same number of squares as on the photocopy).

 

Transfer the image of just Mona, square by square. Renaissance artists were known to use a grid.

 

Put her in new surrounding - add local landscape/buildings, etc. (bring her portrait to the 21st century). Example: have McDonald's in background - have her holding a Big Mac.

 

Activity Resources

Mona Lisa picture to copy and display

 

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Google Art Project link: https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/beta/entity/%2Fm%2F04lg6

 

 

Activity 3 Title Defining Bullying

 

Introduction

In Draw the Line, bullying is a problem. One of the biggest obstacles is how people who view the bullying react. Students need to understand the differences between the different types of bullying. Understanding the different types of bullying allows to student to identify bullying. They also need to understand that “Just Kidding” comments are a way of making bullying acceptable.

 

TEKS

Health 1 TEKS: 13 A, G; 14 B; 15 A, B, B; 16 C

 

Books to Display

Until I Break by Kara Bietz

Hate List by Jennifer Brown

The Five Stages of Andrew Brawley by Shaun David Hutchinson
Being Jazz: My Life as a (Transgender) Teen by Jazz Jennings

Sleeping Freshman Never Lie by David Lubar

If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo

 

Supply List

Butcher paper

Markers

Vignette Cards

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Talk about the four types of bullying:

  1. Verbal- can be heard
  2. Physical- leaves physical marks
  3. Social- heard by others
  4. Intimidation- look, gesture or comment

 

Divide into four groups. Each group will define one type of bullying. Brainstorm on butcher paper: What does it look like, feel like and sound like.

 

Discuss as a class. Be sure to point out how physical and verbal are easy to identify, but what about social bullying and intimidation. What is the process to bullying? Does it escalate?

 

What if “Just Kidding” is added to any of the types of bullying? Does it make it acceptable?

 

Give each group a vignette card. They need to discuss whether it is joking, teasing or bullying and why. Then they need to brainstorm things they can do if they witness the scenario happening.

 

Vignette #1:

Sonia recently moved to her new school. At 6 ft. 1 in. tall, she towers over most of her classmates, especially the girls. While looking for a place to sit, another student called to her, “Hey, Shorty, there’s a spot over here!” Sonia paused for a moment and another girl from the same group waved her over and made room for Sonia to sit. “Don’t pay attention to her, “she told Sonia. “That’s just the way we talk to each other. They call me Einstein because I got all C’s on my last report card.”

Discussion:      Joking, teasing or bullying?

                        Why or why not?

                        How would you respond if you were a bystander that witnessed the interaction?

 

Vignette #2:

For years, Angel has made fun of his best friend, Dave’s, peanut butter obsession. “You’d eat my gym sock if it was covered in peanut butter,” he once told Dave. One day in science lab, the students designed mazes to test the intelligence of white mice. When the teacher told the class that they would be baiting the mazes with peanut butter, Angel called out, “Better be careful- Dave might get to the end of the maze before the mice!” The other students broke out in laughter.

 

Discussion:      Joking, teasing or bullying?

                        Why or why not?

                        How would you respond if you were a bystander that witnessed the interaction?

 

Vignette #3:

On Monday afternoon, Rob hangs campaign posters around the school, which read, “Vote Rob for Student Council President.” On Tuesday morning, Rob found one of his posters taped to the board in the front of the classroom. Someone had crossed out the word, “President,” and replaced it with “First Lady.” One of Rob’s classmates pointed to a girl in the front row, indicating that Maria had altered the poster. Rob glared at her as he tore down the poster. “It’s just a joke,” Maria laughed. “Lighten up- I’m going to vote for you.”

 

Discussion:      Joking, teasing or bullying?

                        Why or why not?

                        How would you respond if you were a bystander that witnessed the interaction?

 

Vignette #4:

Mason is new to his school. He is just starting to hang out with a group of kids who seem pretty nice. One day he walks up to the group who are all looking at a picture on a phone. As soon as they see Mason, they put the phone away. Later, Shelly shows Mason what everyone was looking at. Some had taken a photo that Mason had posted on Snapchat and created an unflattering meme.

 

Discussion:      Joking, teasing or bullying?

                        Why or why not?

                        How would you respond if you were a bystander that witnessed the interaction?

 

 

Activity Resources

Vignettes for Cards

 

Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

Stop Bullying website: https://www.stopbullying.gov/

 

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Active Programs

Printable Copy of Program

Supplemental Documents

Contest Score Card

Adrian Piper uses graphic, comic art as a creative and emotional outlet to deal with everything that is happening in his life. These programs are designed to allow the teens to use their creativity to come up with their own superheroes. Once they have created their own original comics, they get the chance to make a costume based on their comic book character. This culminates in a superhero costume contest where all teens have the opportunity to show off their talents and creativity by wearing their superhero costume creations.

 

Comic Book Creation

Teens get the chance to use their talents and imagination to create their own superheroes. They should look at their own personalities and interests to create a representation of themselves or something that they would like to aspire to. Using either pen/ink and paper or a computer, teens create works of art.

 

Books to Display

DC Justice League: Draw It by DC Justice League

Dangerous by Shannon Hale

How to Draw Comic Book Superheroes Using 5 Easy Shapes by Steve Hilker

How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way by Stan Lee

Stan Lee’s How to Draw Superheroes by Stan Lee

V is for Villain by Peter Moore

I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest

 

Activity Supply List

Pen

Pencil

Markers

Paper

Tables

Computer

 

Detailed Description of Activity

The structure of this program can vary. If possible, ask local artists to come and teach a class to the teens. If you do not know of a local artist, reach out to a comic book store. They can suggest people and they might be able to do it for free. Local If you cannot get an artist, the class can be self-taught by the teens using online directions or drawing books.

 

For the class, collect the needed supplies and make sure the teens have a workspace. For a more traditional pen and paper class, set up individual workspaces at tables. For a class that focuses on using technology, make sure computers are available and the teens can use software or a website to draw their comics.

 

If the class is self-taught rather than having an artist, this class doesn’t need to have a lot of structure as teens will work at their own pace.

 

Costume Design

Teens will use the superheroes created in the comic drawing class as an inspiration for the costumes they will design and wear for the costume contest.

 

Books to Display

The Superhero Costume: Identity and Disguise in Fact and Fiction by Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Design Your Own SUPERHERO Coloring Book by Cool Coloring Books for Kids and Grown-Ups

Epic Cosplay Costumes: A Step-by-Step Guide to Making and Sewing Your Own Costume Designs by Kristie Good

1,000 Incredible Costume and Cosplay Ideas by Yaya Han and Allison DeBlasio

The Costume Making Guide: Creating Armor and Props for Cosplay by Svetlana Quindt

 

Supply List

Felt

Fabric

Glue

Hot Glue Gun

Glue Sticks

Double Sided Tape

Fabric Glue

Glitter

Sequins

Fabric Paint

Scissors

Pens

Markers

Stencils

Safety pins

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Clear an open space for teens to work. They should bring their superhero creations from the previous programs. However, if they don’t want to use their own creation or if they didn’t get the opportunity to attend the previous program, they can use the displayed books for their inspiration.

 

The teens can use the felt to make masks, and the fabric can be made into a cape. Felt or fabric can be used to create their superhero logo. If they want to use the logo on the cape, they can glue the logo directly to the fabric using the hot glue gun or adhere it with double sided tape. If they want to attach it to their shirt, they would be able to use safety pins.

 

Stencils are provided so the teens can create letters or shapes with ease. They can use the markers to trace and the scissors to cut. Sequins and glitter can be used as decorative pieces on their masks or capes.

 

Like the previous activity, this program allows a lot of flexibility to let the teens lead the program.

 

Superhero Costume Contest

These activities have been leading up to the superhero costume contest! Teens have explored their imagination and used their creativity to create a superhero and design a costume to represent that character. The costume contest gives them the chance to show off their creations.

 

Books to Display

The Superhero Costume: Identity and Disguise in Fact and Fiction by Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Design Your Own SUPERHERO Coloring Book by Cool Coloring Books for Kids and Grown-Ups

Epic Cosplay Costumes: A Step-by-Step Guide to Making and Sewing Your Own Costume Designs by Kristie Good

1,000 Incredible Costume and Cosplay Ideas by Yaya Han and Allison DeBlasio

The Costume Making Guide: Creating Armor and Props for Cosplay by Svetlana Quindt

 

Supply List

Volunteer judges

Score Cards

Snacks (Chips, Soda, Cookies)

Music

MP3 player

Speakers

CD player

Pens

Name tag label stickers

 

Prize for winner:

Books

Gift Card

Candy

 

Detailed Description of Activity

Secure at least three volunteers to act as judges of the costume contest. Score cards will be provided to the judges. Designate a space for the contest. Have a sign-in table at the front of the room. When the teens arrive dressed in their costumes, they will come to the table to get a number. They will give the volunteer their superhero name and the will receive a nametag with a number on it starting with 1 and continuing incrementally until all the teens have been registered for the contest. 

 

The teens will appear in front of the judges in numerical order.  They will present the judges with a picture of their inspiration for their costume. If they are using the superhero they created during program one, they can bring that or a picture from a book they used. Teens need to make sure they act in character while they are presenting themselves before the judges.

 

While the judging is going on, the librarian can play music from an MP3 player or CD player for background noise. It will give the teens a chance to enjoy the music. Teens can enjoy snacks and hang out with each other while the contest continues.

 

At the end, the judges will deliberate, and then they will reveal the winner of the contest.

 

Incentives

The librarian can work with their friends group or ask for donations to secure prizes. Donated or advanced copies of books, gift cards, or a candy prize are all great options.

 

Activity Resources

Cosplay Judging Criteria: http://cypruscomiccon.org/cosplay-contest-judging-criteria/

Score Cards

 

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Passive Programs

Printable Copy of Program

Supplemental Documents

Be Yourself Poster

It Gets Better Poster

It Gets Better 2

The Pledge

Draw the Line, at its core, is a book about Adrian, who finds his identity and stands up to bullies with the help of his friends and his drawing. In these programs, teens will be able to participate in a coloring activity that displays the student artwork, and an anti-bullying display that allows teens to see that it does get better.

 

Superhero Coloring

Not just for kids, coloring is a relaxing activity that can take away stress while you create a work of art. During the Comic Book Creation active program, teens will create superheroes and draw their creations digitally or on paper. Once these superheroes have been collected from the teens, the artwork will be used as coloring sheets.

 

Books to Display

DC Justice League: Draw It by DC Justice League

Dangerous by Shannon Hale

How to Draw Comic Book Superheroes Using 5 Easy Shapes by Steve Hilker

How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way by Stan Lee

Stan Lee’s How to Draw Superheroes by Stan Lee

V is for Villain by Peter Moore

I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest

 

Activity Supply List

Table

Photocopier or printer

Scanner (optional)

Paper

Colored pencils

Crayons

Pencil Sharpener

Plastic storage box

Folder

Computer

Flash drive (optional)

Markers

Erasers

 

Detailed Description of Activity

This program will be conducted upon the conclusion of the graphic drawing active program. In that program, teens will be creating superhero drawings using the computer or with traditional paper and pen or pencil. The librarian will gather these drawings with the permission of the teens.

 

After the active program is completed, the librarian can make copies of the superhero creations and the comic strips by printing digital files or making photocopies of the hand-drawn work.

After the coloring sheets have been printed/copied, the librarian will need to put together a box of supplies. The supplies in the box can vary, but some ideas are: markers, crayons, colored pencils, a pencil sharpener, and erasers.

 

Find a table in the library or classroom, and set these items on the table. The coloring sheets can be spread out so it can grab the attention of the teens, or they can be placed in a folder to keep it neat and tidy. This is dependent on the location and the preference of the librarian. Students will be able to go through the coloring sheets, and take one with them.

 

 

Activity 2: It Gets Better!

 

Activity Introduction

In Draw the Line, Adrian, a gay teen, uses drawing as an outlet to share who he really is inside. After intervening during a brutal hate crime against another gay teen, Adrian realizes that not a lot of people will step in and stand up for someone else. This passive program is based on the national program “It Gets Better Project.”

 

Books to Display or Book Talk

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

Adrian and the Tree of Secrets by Marie Calliou

This Book is Gay by James Dawson

George by Alex Gino

The Five Stages of Andrew Brawley by Shaun David Hutchinson

Being Jazz: My Life as a (Transgender) Teen by Jazz Jennings

It Gets Better: Coming Out, Overcoming Bullying, and Creating a Life Worth Living ed. Dan Savage

 

Activity Supply List

Display Stand/Area with room for books to display

Small bulletin board or paper bulletin board

It Gets Better Posters (provided by committee)

QR code which links to “It Gets Better” Project Videos (provided by committee)

4x4 squares of different colored paper

Pencils

Pens

Markers

Stencils (optional)

 

 

Detailed Description of Activity

This is a passive activity encouraging and supporting LGBTQ youth, but really it supports humankind. Create a title for the display using paper, stencils and colors. Depending on display set up, display books listed above or others that deal with the topic of LGBTQ.

Create an area using a bulletin board or different colored paper. Title the area “Why Does It Get Better?” Add the following directions: “Using the squares of paper write or draw an encouraging word about why life gets better. Think about what is good in your life and share!”

Display The Pledge handout and encourage patrons to go to the website and sign the pledge.

 

Activity Resources (Produced by the Committee)

Flyers

 

Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers & Librarians

 

It Gets Better- www.Itgetsbetter.org

 

 

 

 

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Created on Mar 7, 2017 | Last updated April 17, 2017