Author Feature-Tara Dairman

 


Spirit of Texas Reading Program

Middle School

Featured Author

Tara Dairman

 

 


 

Find her on the web:

Website


 

 


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Book Trailer

 


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Book Quiz

Printable Copy

Quiz Key

1.  Every year on Founders Day, the citizens of St. Polonius on the Fjord who were older than twelve years, four months, and six days old

     a.  performed a re-enactment of the founding of the city.

     b.  danced with a bear.

     c.  ate a bite of bear liver.

     d. took a long nap.

 

2.  Jean's parents were against the thistleberry processing plant because

     a.  they did not want better satellite service.

     b.  they did not want the mayor to lose money.

     c.  they were afraid that all the thistleberries would die out.

     d.  they did not want to work in a factory.

 

3.  After all the adults and teens fell asleep,

     a.  Magnus held a meeting in the town.

     b.  the children took on their parents' jobs.

     c.  Magnus' cousins were appointed constables.

     d.  All of the above.

 

4.  Jean wanted to take a boat to Bigsby-on-the-bay

     a.  to get fish for the restaurant.

     b.  to see a tourist boat.

     c.   to find help for the sleeping adults.

     d.  to see whales.

 

5.  Dr. Mary Fields' thistleberry research showed that

     a.  exposure to large amounts of thistleberry would be dangerous because it contained a neurotoxin.

     b. thistleberries were a good food for bears.

     c.  a thistleberry processing plant would bring better communications to St. Polonius.

     d.  sheep could survive on a diet of thistleberries.

 

6.  Isara's parents wanted their restaurant to be successful because

     a.  they planned to open more Thai restaurants in the area.

     b.  they wanted to close it and study whales.

     c.  they wanted everyone to love Thai food.

     d.  they planned to return to Thailand after making enough money.

 

7.  When Isara and Jean went to Mr. Miller's restaurant for supplies,

     a.  they didn't find any food that they could use.

     b.  they discovered that the power had been turned off.

     c.  they walked in through the open door to the restaurant.

     d.  they saw someone put a box in the refrigerator and sneak out.

 

8.  One day at dinner, Magnus was passing out a flyer that

     a.  encouraged the children to vote against the thistleberry processing plant.

     b.  requested more recruits for the police force.

     c.  suggested that children check on their sleeping parents and siblings.

     d.  advertised an upcoming celebration at the Thai restaurant.

 

9.  Who hunted the bears for the Founders Day celebration?

     a.  Axel and his dad

     b.  The mayor and his son

     c.  Dr. Mary Fields

     d.  Jean's mother and father

 

10.  While at a meeting at the hair salon, Jean, Isara, and the other resisting children discovered

     a.  that the mayor had not known anything about the dangers of the thistleberry processing plant.

     b.  the bear liver eaten by the parents and teens was full of thistleberry neurotoxin.

     c.  that the story of the founding of St. Polonius was true, right down to the saints.

     d.  that Magnus was not involved in making the adults and teens go to sleep.

 

11. Jean and Isara didn't fall asleep even though they were old enough to eat the liver because

     a.  they were immune to the thistleberry neurotoxin.

     b.  they had already found Dr. Fields' antidote.

     c.  they didn't believe in the stories about Founders Day.

     d.  they didn't eat the liver.

 

12.  Magnus

     a.  was simply trying to do his father's job as mayor.

     b.  planned the hibernation so he could be mayor himself.

     c.  was waiting for his father to wake up and run the election.

     d.  knew what the antidote to the neurotoxin was. 

 

 

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Academic Program 

Printable Copy

Constitution Comparison  Table

Scavengar Hunt

Scavenger Hunt Answer Key

Take Me To Your Leader: Governments and their Documents

In the book The Great Hibernation by Tara Dairman, the government of St. Polonius-on-the Fjord becomes an Autocracy with all decisions being made by the stand-in Mayor, Magnus King.  The town charter seems to support this action by Magnus.  The Great Hibernation tells us that St. Polonius on the Square has a charter that instructs “if adults are incapacitated, their eldest progeny of the same gender shall subsequently be recruited to fulfill the occupational and civic duties of that citizen until such time as the adult citizen has recovered.” (Dairman, p. 48).  This statement in the charter is interpreted by Magnus, as the mayor’s son, as license to take control of the town.

In the lessons that follow, comparisons will be made among types of government and governing documents, notably constitutions.

Activity 1-6th grade

Governments and constitutions

 By doing these activities, 6th graders should have a better understanding of different types of governments and what sorts of constitutions these governments use. The activities should take two days to complete, but the second part might take an extra day.

 Day 1

Types of Governments (Who Rules?)

 Activity Introduction

This activity will help students identify different types of governments and what sorts of constitutions these governments have produced.  

 Activity TEKS

Social Studies Grade 6 - 113.18 b (11) A, B (12) A, B

 Detailed description of activity: 

Students will need one class period to complete this activity. 

Use the materials in iCivics “Who Rules?” to present the types of government.  https://www.icivics.org/teachers/lesson-plans/who-rules. You will need to set up a free account to access these materials.  Print the PDF files and copy the activities for students.  Follow the instructions in the lesson plan for presentation.  

Day 2

Constitutional Comparisons

Activity introduction

As charters are to cities, constitutions are to states and nations.  This lesson will guide students to compare parts of constitutions as directed below.

Ideally, this should be done the day after the Types of Governments lesson.

 Activity TEKS

6th grade  Social Studies 113.18b (11) A, B (12) A, B

 Detailed Description of Activity

  Compare and contrast the constitutions of several countries using the website https://www.constituteproject.org .  Select three countries and four topics to compare by using the “compare” function on the site.  You will only be able to do two at a time, so you will need to use the function twice in order to make the correct comparisons.  Use the same topics each time.  Some constitutions will not address some topics; select topics that are covered in at least two constitutions.  Summarize your findings in a table, either drawn or typed. There is a completed example in the "Activity Resources" section.

Evaluation rubric- 10 possible points

10 points meets all the following criteria

            Three countries chosen-3

            Four topics chosen-4

            Each topic found in at least two constitutions-2

            Chart is filled out completely-1

Points are removed accordingly.  For example, if only two countries are completed, there would be a loss of either 2 or 3 points: one for lack of country, one for chart not filled out completely, and possibly one for not finding each topic in at least 2 constitutions.  

 Books to display

Country books from the Enchantment of the World series from Children’s Press, a World Almanac in print if you have one.

 

Supply List

Handouts from iCivics website

Paper for drawing charts, if drawn instead of typed.

 

Activity Resources 

Constitution Comparison Table (sample)

Country

 

Topic

 

Russian Federation

 

Norway

 

Costa Rica

Official religion

Secular state, no established religion

Evangelical Lutheran

Roman Catholic

Type of government envisioned

Republican

Kingdom, with hereditary rule

Republic

Official Language

Russian

No provision found

Spanish

Compulsory voting

No provisions found

No reference made

yes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: This sample table would not receive a grade of 10 points because Compulsory Voting had no provisions or references in two of the three countries’ constitutions. 

 Resources for Teens, Librarians, and Teachers

iCivics website https://icivics.org

Constitute website https://www.constituteproject.org/search?lang=en

Enchantment of the World country book series published by Childrens Press/Scholastic

 


 

Activity 2 -7th Grade

 Activity Title

Republic or State?  A Texas Constitutions Scavenger Hunt

 Activity Introduction

The purpose of this activity is to become familiar with the Texas State Constitution that is currently in force and see how it compares with the Constitution of the Republic of Texas. 

 Activity TEKS

Social Studies Grade 7 – 1C, 3C and D, 14 A and B, 15C, 16 A and B

Technology Applications Grade 7 – 6D

 Detailed Description of Activity

This activity would optimally be done when studying the Texas State Constitution of 1876, but it could be done after studying Texas’ independence from Spain and the formation of the Republic.  It should take one class period. 

Introduce the activity by telling students that they are going to answer questions comparing the Constitution of the Republic of Texas (1836) with the Texas State Constitution of 1876 by looking for these answers in the text of the constitutions online.

At this point, students may be divided into pairs or small groups depending on the number of available computers (one computer per pair or small group).  If there is access to a computer lab, the students can work individually on the activity.

Hand out the questions page, one per pair or group, or one each if working individually. 

Direct the students to the following sites:

https://tarltonapps.law.utexas.edu/constitutions/texas1836

https://tarltonapps.law.utexas.edu/constitutions/texas1876

They can search the indicated constitution texts by toggling back and forth between open tabs (keeping both tabs open), or by using a split screen by dragging one tab to the left and the other to the right.  The latter method will allow for a side-by-side comparison.

Tell them to fill out the answers on the page.  Allow about half an hour to 40 minutes to complete the activity, depending on how long the class period is.

Collect the papers and see how many questions were answered at the end of the allotted time. 

Project the answer page either from the computer or on a transparency with an overhead projector, depending on what you have available to you. 

This can count as a daily grade for participants.

As assessment, take several questions that all the students answered and include them on a unit test. 

 Incentives

As students complete the entire sheet, they might receive a stamp or sticker or other small incentive of your choice.

Books to Display

Any books that your library has on Texas history, particularly the war for independence. 

Documents of Texas History by Ernest Wallace, David M. Vigness and George B. Ward (contains text of the Constitution of the Republic of Texas 1836)

 

Activity Supply List

Computers with internet access for each group, pair, or student

Questions handout for each group, pair, or student

Answer key that can be displayed after most students have finished the activity

 Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers, and Librarians

https://tarltonapps.law.utexas.edu/constitutions/texas1836/general_provisions

https://tarltonapps.law.utexas.edu/constitutions/texas1876

Documents of Texas History by Ernest Wallace, David M. Vigness and George B. Ward

 


 

Acivity 3-8th grade

 Activity Introduction

For an eighth grade activity, I recommend using the iCivics lessons entitled “Wanted-A Just Right Government” and “Anatomy of the Constitution” from the website https://www.icivics.org.  The steps and instructions are included in the plans for these lessons. 

 Activity TEKS

Social Studies Grade 8-4C, D, and E

 Detailed Description of Activity

iCivics was founded by former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.  Its mission is to teach students about civics and government.  The lesson plans are complete and detailed enough to be used as they are presented on the website.  Teachers will need to create a free account (it really is free, no strings attached) in order to access the lesson plans. Follow the instructions in the two suggested lesson plans and use the student handouts and activities found in them.

 Incentives

None needed, but a stamp or sticker could be given on completion of the handouts.

Books to Display

Our Constitution Rocks by Juliette Turner

Drafting the Constitution by Kristin Eck

The Constitution: The Preamble and the Articles by Daniel Weidner, Ed.D

The Articles of Confederation by Barbara Silberdick Feinberg

The Constitution and the Founding of a New Nation by Hal Marcovitz

This Is Our Constitution by Khizr Khan

Activity Supply List

Handouts printed from the iCivics website

Teacher instructions, also printed from the iCivics website

 Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers, and Librarians

https://www.icivics.org, specifically-

https://www.icivics.org/teachers/lesson-plans/wanted-just-right-government

https://www.icivics.org/teachers/lesson-plans/anatomy-constitution

Our Constitution Rocks by Juliette Turner

Drafting the Constitution by Kristin Eck

The Constitution: The Preamble and the Articles by Daniel Weidner, Ed.D

The Articles of Confederation by Barbara Silberdick Feinberg

The Constitution and the Founding of a New Nation by Hal Marcovitz

 

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Active Program

Printable Copy

Flyer

Checklist

Pennant Banner

Banner Example

Recruitment Poster

Triangle Template


Activity Title

Have a Founder’s Day Celebration for your Library or School

 

Activity Introduction

 In The Great Hibernation by Tara Dairman, the action starts during the annual Founders’ Day Celebration.  Each year the citizens of St. Polonius-on-the-Fjord celebrate the day of their in several ways, including a re-enactment of the founding, a feast, and the eating of a bite of bear liver.

This guide offers planning advice so that a Founders’ Day celebration can be held for your school or library.

Detailed description of activity

 First, find out details of the founding of the school or library.  Whose idea was it to have a school or library in your location?  Is it part of a bigger system, such as an Independent School District or a city library, or is it a single entity (Charter school, small town or city, rural school library that is shared across all grade levels)? Is the school’s library a recent addition to the school or has it been recently updated, making it worthy of its own Founders’ Day Celebration? 

What year was it first opened? Was there a special celebration for the grand opening?  If you can find the date of this celebration, you may want to use that as the Founders’ Day.  You may have to do some research to find out when the school or library first opened.  Usually the school district or the city government would have such information.  If the exact day can’t be pinpointed, consider selecting a day within the month (hopefully) or the time of year it was opened (for example, the first day of school). 

Is your library or school named for a person?  If so, what was that person’s contribution to the community that made the founders decide to use that particular name?  When you find out the information about the individual, it could be made into a display (slide show, brief movie if there are video clips, wall or case display, pamphlet or brochure, or a combination of these). 

Once you have done the research and selected the date, you will need to plan a program.  At least several people should be involved in the program planning phase; ideally, several committees would be enlisted, one for each aspect of the program.  Here are some possible examples of areas that a person, two people, or a committee might cover:

Programming This will be the person or group responsible for deciding what is to be included in the celebration and in what order the events will occur. Ideally, it should be a committee, or at least two people, rather than just one person, and it should include middle school age students. There is a sample recruitment poster in the Activity Resources section below. The programming committee or group will need to make many decisions as to the content of the celebration before any other group can act on their responsibilities. For example, will there be a formal program with a speaker?  Will there be a banquet, or a cake, or just some appropriate snacks?  What sorts of activities will there need to be for students/children?  Who will be responsible for the setup and takedown of any special furnishings or decorations needed, and where will these come from?  Also, responsible for coming up with a timeline for planning, with deadlines set along the way to ensure that the event will take place smoothly. Sample timeline checklists from West Point are included in the Activity Resources; these are for example purposes only and would need to be adapted to be used in school or public libraries.

 Advertising and promotion This person or group is responsible for making sure the event is publicized on social media and in print resources, and for creating notifications on-site (posters, flyers, announcements, and the like). Publicize the Founders’ Day Celebration on social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, webpage) and in any local newspapers in your area.  Also notifications can be placed in your building and on any marquee or electronic sign that might be available for announcement or advertising purposes. A sample flyer is included in the Activity Resources.

 Speaker (if needed) This person or group will find a knowledgeable and/or appropriate speaker for the event and give the speaker guidelines to follow, such as topic and length of the speech.  The guidelines will be created by the Speaker committee in conjunction with the Programming committee.  

Food It wouldn’t be much of a celebration without some sort of food.  The Food person or group is responsible for deciding what kind of food and how much should be served at the main event and any satellite events. This group will be responsible for serving the food, so will need to consider plates, bowls, napkins, cups, and plasticware. 

Decorations This group is responsible for designing and providing any decorations needed for the celebration locale.  It might include decorations made as part of the celebration, such as pennant banners. Instructions and templates for making pennant banners can be found in the Activity Resources section below. Table coverings can be included in this group’s responsibilities. 

Set-up and take-down This can be one group or two different groups, depending on how large the celebration is.  This person or group is responsible for making sure everything is where it needs to be for the celebration, and for putting the location back in its proper configuration after the event has ended. Please note that the person or group SHOULD NOT BE responsible for doing all the work themselves, but rather delegating so that others help out with setting up and taking down.

Prizes and incentives

During the event, there could be drawings with prizes such as books, pencils, plastic cups, and/or small toys at random times or all together at the end.    Some of these, such as pencils, pens, and cups, can be personalized.  Oriental Trading Company is good for the non-book prizes.  Books might be donated from a local bookstore, or you may be able to obtain Advance Reader copies from publishers.  If there is a Scholastic warehouse near you, that can be an inexpensive resource for books.

You may decide there are more areas that need attention from people or committees; these are only suggestions. 

Suggestions for this sort of celebration can be found in many places. General party ideas can work for Founders’ Day celebrations, such as ordering food, party favors (Oriental Trading Company is a great place for inexpensive party favors, and some can even be personalized), and decorations.  The Founders’ Day is as unique and specific as your school or library, and some plans will need to be made accordingly (speaker, program, what sort of food and favors, and theme).   

 

Books to display

Any Local History books that you have available, even if they don’t pertain to your library specifically.  If your school or library is named for a person, any available books about that person could be displayed.  If your school is based on a certain educational philosophy, such as Montessori, books about that philosophy and/or the person who created it would be appropriate to display.

Activity Supply List

This list will change based on your planned celebration

Food (dinner, cake, snacks, as decided by committee and dictated by budget)

Napkins (these could be personalized with the event and date)

Plasticware if needed

Plates as needed for types of food

Cups, if serving a beverage, or water bottles

Trash receptacles

Materials for Pennant Banners, if using

                Template for banners

                Card stock, lightweight cardboard, or construction paper to make banners

                Pictures of building, founder, and/or mascot

                Markers, colored pencils, pens, or crayons to mark on pennants

                Glue for attaching pictures to pennants

                Hole punch for attaching pennants to ribbon or string (if no hole punch can be found, glue can be used for this)

                String or ribbon for attaching pennants to make banner

Specifics for other decorations will be at the discretion of the committee. 

Incentives

Prizes for drawings

Books, pencils, plastic cups, and/or small toys (Some of these, such as pencils, pens, and cups, can be personalized).  Oriental Trading Company is good for the non-book prizes, as is Amazon.  Books might be donated from a local bookstore, or you may be able to obtain Advance Reader copies from publishers.  If there is a Scholastic warehouse near you, that can be an inexpensive resource for books.

Activity Resources

Flyers

Pennant banner instructions

Triangle Template Model

Sample planning timeline checklists from West Point (need to be adapted for school or public library use)

Resources for Teens, Teachers, and Librarians

http://www.whitefishpilot.com/local_news/20171215/founders_day_celebration_honors_key_figures_in_big_mountain_skiing This is an article about a small Founders Day Celebration in Whitefish, Montana.  It is an example of what can be done on a small scale with a Founders Day Celebration.

Oriental Trading Company http://www.orientaltrading.com

Amazon https://www.amazon.com

 

 

 

               

 

 

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Passive Programs 

Passive Program 1

Book Example

Book Template

Poisonous Plant Pictures

Passive Program 2

 

Passive Program

 

Introduction:  In the book The Great Hibernation by Tara Dairman, the fictitious thistleberry is found to contain a nerve toxin that makes people fall into a coma. In reality, many common plants contain various types of poisons that cause a range of symptoms from mild discomfort to rapid death.   In this activity, students will learn about different types of poisonous plants that may be found in many fields and yards and along the sides of many well-driven roads. They will create a small booklet entitled “My Little Book of Poisonous Plants” or another title of the students’ choice. The booklet may be illustrated with student artwork or with coloring sheets

 

Activity Title:  Name that (poisonous) plant!

 

Activity Introduction:  Many common plants contain poisons that may make you uncomfortable, or that may kill you!  Using Internet and/or books and magazines, make a small booklet of common poisonous plants.

 

 Activity Detail: 

Use the pages with the headings (Name of Plant, Type of Poison) for the first step in making your booklet. Your book should include the following types of poisonous plants, one plant per page:

 

At least one plant with all or almost all parts poisonous

 

At least one plant that we often eat that can be poisonous.  It may either have poisonous parts that we don’t eat or the food itself may be poisonous if it is green/too ripe/uncooked.

 

At least one plant whose poison is used to make a helpful medicine

 

At least one plant that has a poison that affects your skin

 

A plant that everyone thinks is poisonous but is actually almost harmless

 

Some interesting facts you might include are where the plant grows, what type of poison it contains, how the poison affects the body, folktales and legends about the plant, how it got its common name, and anything else that might be fun to remember.

 

When you have at least five pages of plants, create an illustration for each one. It can be your own drawing, a coloring sheet, or a picture printed from the Internet.  Color is best, but if no color printer is available and you choose to use printed pictures, you can either color over the black and white image or describe the colors of the plant on the page with the picture.  Make sure to leave at least one inch on the left side of the page when making your illustration for binding your booklet.

 

After this is done, take two half sheets of card stock or construction paper, or fold a piece of construction paper in half.  Put the title on the page you will use for the front.  Line up the left side of the pages with one side of your covers.  You can either staple the booklets together or punch two holes in the left side of the booklet and tie yarn or twine through the holes.  Show your finished booklet to the librarian or to your teacher.

 

 

Books to display:

 Plants That Can Kill by Stacy Tornio

 Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln’s Mother & Other Botanical Atrocities by Amy Stewart

 Any field guides to plants and/or flowers, such as A Field Guide to Wildflowers, Trees, and Shrubs by Delena Tull and George Oxford Miller

 Deadliest Plants on Earth by Connie Colwell Miller

 Killer Plants by Helen Orme

 Creeping Killers: Extreme Plants by Louise Spilburg

 (the first two books may not be available in many middle school libraries.  They might be available from a nearby public library, or they can be purchased from a jobber or from Amazon.)

 

 

Supplies:

 

Plant pages (half sheets, see Resources) 

Half sheets of card stock or construction paper, OR whole 9X12 inch construction paper

 Colored pencils

 Coloring Sheets (see Resources)

 Hole punch (two hole or one hole preferred, but a three hole can be used if it is adjustable)

 Yarn or twine to tie the book together (thread it through the holes and tie a knot or a bow)

 OR Stapler to staple the left side together.  Duct tape to cover the staples.

 

Resources:

 http://www.thespruce.com/pictures-of-poisonous-plants-2132624

 http://www.modernfarmer.com/2015/08/secretly-poisonous-plants

 http://www.aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/earthkind/landscape/poisonous-plants-resources/common-poisonous-plants-and-plant-parts

 Encyclopedia Britannica Online "Poisonous plants." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 1 Nov. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/poisonous-plants/276455. Accessed 15 Dec. 2017.

 In World Book Encyclopedia, the article about Poisonous Plants, and cross-references

 https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/kids/coloring/colornoxiousweeds.shtml for some coloring pages (not all plants on this site are poisonous)

 

 

 



General Introduction

In the book The Great Hibernation by Tara Dairman, Magnus King is very proud of having won the spelling bee.  How’s your spelling?  This activity will help you find out if you could qualify for the Scripps National Spelling Bee.


Activity Title

Come on down for a “spell”-take the Scripps National Spelling Bee online test


Activity Introduction

This test, found at http://spellingbee.com/take-test, is an on-line practice test for the official Scripps spelling bee held in many schools across the United States.


Detailed description of activities

The test is interactive.  The computer pronounces the word and the speller types it into the space. The speller can push the pronunciation button multiple times.  Alternative pronunciations are included, and definitions and use of the word in a sentence are included.  There is a vocabulary portion.  The speller is given the opportunity to change the original answers, and then the test is submitted.  The score appears, and the speller is either given the opportunity to spell the next round (if he or she qualifies in the preliminary) or the test is over.  If the speller spells incorrectly in the next round, the test is over. 

To advertise this program, a flyer or poster could be placed in a strategic location and above the computer stations that can be used to take the test. 


Books to display:

The Great Hibernation by Tara Dairman

How Do You Spell Geek? By Julie Ann Peters

Scholastic Dictionary of Spelling

As if being 12 3/4 isn't bad enough, my mother is running for president by Donna Gephart


Activity Supply List

Computer with Internet access and the following specifications:

                Sound

                Javascript enabled

                A minimum resolution of 1024 x 768

                Firefox, Safari, or Internet Explorer 6 or newer

                Flash 9 or newer

                Adobe Acrobat Reader (if you wish to print your score report)

Headphones or earbuds (if you prefer not to have the sound heard by all)

Printer (if you wish to have the scores printed)


Incentives

No incentive is really necessary, but students could be given a sticker or a stamp when they complete the activity if desired. 


Activity Resources

Flyer/poster


Activity Resources for Teens, Teachers, and Librarians

http://spellingbee.com/take-test

The Great Hibernation by Tara Dairman

How Do You Spell Geek? By Julie Ann Peters

Scholastic Dictionary of Spelling

As if being 12 3/4 isn't bad enough, my mother is running for president by Donna Gephart




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Created on Mar 23, 2018 | Last updated April 30, 2018